C.G Jung
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In the Heart of the Supreme Mind: Thoth Hermes Trismegistus

In the Heart of the Supreme Mind: Thoth Hermes Trismegistus | C.G Jung | Scoop.it
Johfra, “Hermes Trismegistus”
In The Secret Teachings of All Ages by Manly P. Hall, I came across the following passage, which I found very illuminating:
“Before the visible universe was formed its mold was cast.

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Eva Rider's curator insight, August 9, 2014 4:51 PM

As above, so below from Spirit into Matter...

 

A Rosemont Journey's curator insight, August 15, 2014 12:37 PM
As the power of Shiva and Shakti lies in their union, so the greatness of Hermes is derived from his union with Anima Mundi – the Soul of the World. Hermes/Thoth is a patron of all brands of soulful knowledge: he presides over the marriage of mysticism and science. Magic, alchemy, symbology, astrology, tarot are all under his dominion.
Eva Rider's curator insight, January 17, 2015 2:49 PM

“Before the visible universe was formed its mold was cast.

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COMPENSATIONS FOR INADEQUACY

COMPENSATIONS FOR INADEQUACY | C.G Jung | Scoop.it

“How many of those who are insecure seek power over others as a compensation for inadequacy and wind up bringing consequences down upon their heads and those around them?

 

How many hide out in their lives, resist the summons to show up, or live fugitive lives, jealous, projecting onto others, and then wonder why nothing ever really feels quite right.

 

How many proffer compliance with the other, buying peace at the price of soul, and wind up with neither?”

 

― James Hollis, Ph. D., Hauntings


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Quotes from “Memories, Dreams, and Reflections” by C.G. Jung

Quotes from “Memories, Dreams, and Reflections” by C.G. Jung | C.G Jung | Scoop.it

“The decisive question for a man is: is he related to something infinite or not? That is the telling question of his life. Only if we know that the thing which truly matters is the infinite can we avoid fixing our interest upon futilities, and upon all kinds of goals which are not of real importance. Thus we demand that the world grant us recognition for qualities we regard as personal possessions: our talent and our beauty.

 

The more a man lays stress on false possessions, and the less sensitivity he has for what is essential, the less satisfying is his life. He feels limited because he has limited aims, and the result is envy and jealousy. If we understand and feel that here in this life we already have a link with the infinite, desires and attitudes change. In the final analysis, we count for something only because of the essential we embody, and if we do not embody that, life is wasted.

 

In our relationships to other men, too, the crucial question is whether an element of boundlessness is expressed in the relationship.” (Click title for more)


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maria taveras's curator insight, September 6, 2014 9:05 PM

A treasure of a book for those who seek a deeper understanding of their authentic nature. 

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A Brief Introduction to C. G. Jung and Analytical Psychology

A Brief Introduction to C. G. Jung and Analytical Psychology | C.G Jung | Scoop.it

Carl Gustav Jung was the best known member of the group that formed the core of the early psychoanalytic movement—followers and students of Sigmund Freud. After completing his medical studies, Jung obtained a position at the Burghoelzli Hospital in Zurich, Switzerland. There he worked with patients suffering from schizophrenia, while also conducting word association research.

 

In 1904 Jung corresponded with Freud about this latter work and also began to use Freud's psychoanalytic treatment with his patients. In 1906 Freud invited Jung to Vienna, and they began a professional relationship. Freud soon began to favor Jung as his successor in the new and growing psychoanalytic movement.

 

Through Freud's efforts, Jung was appointed Permanent President of the Association of Psycho-Analysis at its Second Congress in 1910. Jung and Freud held in common an understanding of the profound role of the unconscious. Their understanding of the nature of the unconscious, however, began to diverge. This led to a painful break between the two men... (Click title for more)


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Carol Sherriff's curator insight, August 8, 2014 5:02 AM

Interesting introduction to Jung's work. For facilitators perhaps best known for developing archetypes that underpin facilitation tools such as Heroes' Journey (my preference to Hero's)

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Liminality, Thresholds, and the Symbolic Landscape ~ Betsy Perluss PhD

Liminality, Thresholds, and the Symbolic Landscape ~ Betsy Perluss PhD | C.G Jung | Scoop.it

One of the greatest deceptions of modern culture is that there is no direct relationship between the external realm of matter and the realm of psyche. The lie continues to promote the notion that while the concrete realm is “objective”, clean and clear-cut, and rational, the realm of psyche, the dream realm, is “subjective”, vague, fuzzy, irrational, and thus, not worth serious attention.

 

Furthermore, through our scientific understanding of the world, which values the “objective” over the “subjective”, we have demythologized the natural world, extracting from it any symbolic meaning, having sent this back into the unconscious. The result, as Carl Jung states, is a world that has been emptied of soul and a human consciousness that stands aloof from creation, further promoting what Jung calls, “The Cult of Consciousness”.

 

Through scientific understanding, our world has become dehumanized. Man feels himself isolated in the cosmos. He is no longer involved in nature and has lost his emotional participation in natural events, which hitherto had a symbolic meaning for him. Thunder is no longer the voice of a god, nor is lightening his avenging missile. No river contains a spirit, no tree means... (Click title for more)


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Jung and Teilhard de Chardin

Jung and Teilhard de Chardin | C.G Jung | Scoop.it

 "Teilhard de Chardin and Carl Jung never met. Dr. Jung did finish reading The Phenomenon of Man less than a month before his death. The book had both a great and visible impact upon Dr. Jung according to Michael Serrano. It must have been satisfying for Dr. Jung to see Teilhard de Chardin from the perspective of a paleontologist and Jesuit Priest reach the same empirical conclusions about the evolution of consciousness that Dr. Jung found in his empirical research in Depth Psychology.
It is a peculiar oddity that both Teilhard de Chardin and Dr. Jung stressed the empirical nature of their work yet often find their books categorized under "Philosophy" and "New Age." This in itself justifies the importance of this great book as the recognition of consciousness and the reality of the inner world of the soul is far from recognized even at the dawn of the 21st century" ~Lewis Lafontaine   Carl Jung was reading Teilhard de Chardin during the last few days of his life. According to Miguel Serrano, when he visited Jung on May 10, 1961, "On the small table beside the chair where Jung was sitting, was a book called The Human Phenomenon by Teilhard de Chardin. I asked Jung whether he had read it. 'It is a great book,' he said. His face was pale, but seemed strangely illuminated by an inner light." (Miguel Serrano, C.G. Jung and Hermann Hesse: A Record of Two Friendships [New York: Schocken Books, 1968] pp. 100-101) Jung died on June 6, 1961.


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Kathy Mays's curator insight, March 7, 2015 3:50 AM















Beth Moon photograph


Poem by Pierre Teilhard de Chardin

"When the signs of age begin to mark my body

(and still more when they touch my mind);

when the ill that is to diminish me or carry me off

strikes from without or is born within me;

when the painful moment comes

in which I suddenly awaken

to the fact that I am ill or growing old;

and above all at that last moment

when I feel I am losing hold of myself

and am absolutely passive within the hands

of the great unknown forces that have formed me;

in all those dark moments, O God,

grant that I may understand that it is you

(provided only my faith is strong enough)

who are painfully parting the fibers of my being 

in order to penetrate to the very marrow

of my substance and bear me away within yourself."

 

Pierre Teilhard de Chardin (1880-1955)  

from the book The jesuit Guide to (almost) Everything by James Martin

 
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The Jung Lexicon by Jungian analyst, Daryl Sharp, Toronto

The Jung Lexicon by Jungian analyst, Daryl Sharp, Toronto | C.G Jung | Scoop.it
Daryl Sharp is the publisher and general editor of Inner City Books. The Jung Lexicon has been made available to The Jung Page through the generosity of its author.

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Depth Insights » The Soul of the Soldier: An Archetypal Inquiry into the Rhetoric of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder by Ipek S. Burnett

Depth Insights » The Soul of the Soldier: An Archetypal Inquiry into the Rhetoric of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder by Ipek S. Burnett | C.G Jung | Scoop.it
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Review: "A New Earth" by Eckhart Tolle

Beneath the surface, everything is connected with everything else and also connected to the Source of all life. When you first hold on to an object without naming it, you feel its essence, which is the same as your essence or Being.

 

When you do not cover the world with words, a miracle of newness and freshness is experienced by your essential self. One must disentangled oneself with all the forms that one has been mixed up with of so far. This disentanglement is what this book is all about. The faster one labels things the more intelligent one becomes, but the less wisdom one has.

 

The Illusion of self. The words “I”, “me”, “my” and “mine” are the most frequently used and also the most misleading. “I” embodies the primordial error, a misconception of who you are, an illusory sense of identity. This is the ego. This illusory sense of self is according to Albert Einstein “an optical illusion of consciousness.” That illusory self then becomes the basis for all further interpretations or rather misinterpretations of reality, all thought processes, interactions, and relationships ... (Click title for more)

 


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Dimitris Tsantaris's curator insight, July 14, 2014 3:51 PM

Even if it flirts with commercialised/pop new-ageism, Tolle's "A New Earth" is a great book with very interesting and useful concepts.

John Donovan's curator insight, September 17, 2014 5:14 AM

Great book. Just being is so much better than I am. 

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Quotes from C.G. Jung On The Shadow

Quotes from C.G. Jung On The Shadow | C.G Jung | Scoop.it
Unfortunately there can be no doubt that man is, on the whole, less good than he imagines himself or wants to be. Everyone carries a shadow, and the less it is embodied in the individual's conscious life, the blacker and denser it is. If an inferiority is conscious, one always has a chance to correct it. Furthermore, it is constantly in contact with other interests, so that it is continually subjected to modifications. But if it is repressed and isolated from consciousness, it never gets corrected.

"Psychology and Religion" (1938). In CW 11: Psychology and Religion: West and East. P.131
"Taking it in its deepest sense, the shadow is the invisible saurian tail that man still drags behind him. Carefully amputated, it becomes the healing serpent of the mysteries. Only monkeys parade with it.The Integration of the Personality. (1939) (Click title for more)


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Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung: But when you die, nobody else will die for you or instead of you.

Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung: But when you die, nobody else will die for you or instead of you. | C.G Jung | Scoop.it
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Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung: Yoga, to me, is no more than a subject for research.

Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung: Yoga, to me, is no more than a subject for research. | C.G Jung | Scoop.it
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Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung: "Psychic reality" is a controversial concept, like "psyche" or "mind."

Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung: "Psychic reality" is a controversial concept, like "psyche" or "mind." | C.G Jung | Scoop.it
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Soul Spelunker » Worlds of Being and Meaning

Soul Spelunker » Worlds of Being and Meaning | C.G Jung | Scoop.it

Our ego-centered culture has not yet grasped the fact that the archetypal structures of all reality are these worlds of being and meaning. We do not live in these worlds; these worlds live through us.  To the degree that we recognize the Powers who manifest through our lives, we can become that which we were meant to be.

 

These Powers are in conflict with each other. Throughout our lives, we undergo our very own Trojan War. Pathologization is the way of the soul. This conflict can be mediated by a “transcendent function,” which is the “transpersonal nature of the archetypal structures…it gives us an Archimedean point of leverage, a perspective on the world from the standpoint of the world whose name is that of a God or Goddess” (ibid.).


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Eva Rider's curator insight, August 10, 2014 10:24 PM

More on the Transcendent Function: the apex of the sacred triangle: through the looking glass into the reality not yet imagined

 

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Image is Everything: Mythology, Hillman, and Jung

Image is Everything: Mythology, Hillman, and Jung | C.G Jung | Scoop.it

Nothing could be more mistaken than to assume that a myth is something ‘thought up.’ It comes into existence of its own accord, as can be observed in all authentic products of fantasy, and particularly in dreams. It is the hybris of consciousness to pretend that everything derives from its primacy, despite the fact that consciousness itself demonstrably comes from an older unconscious psyche.” *

 

When Jung observes that “image is psyche,” (CW 13, §75), or James Hillman writes in this context that “According to Jung, the sine qua non of any consciousness whatsoever is the ‘psychic image,’” (Anima: An Anatomy 95), both men are not just saying that “image is everything” but also that “everything is image.” At any moment we are surrounded by language, images, and motifs created by the unconscious fantasy or myth-making mind (a.k.a. the “psyche” or soul) in its need to understand, make order out of, and create meaning for everyday existence... (Click title for more)


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Finding deeper meanings in the language of mental health

Finding deeper meanings in the language of mental health | C.G Jung | Scoop.it

A word is like a promise; a failure to deliver a kind of betrayal.  What does the language of mental health promise?

 

PSYCHOLOGY “study of the soul” (ψυχή, psukhē, meaning “breath”, “spirit”, or “soul”); and (-λογία -logia, translated as “study of” or “research”)

 

An essential part of the “scientific” training for young psychology/psychiatry/counseling grad students is a total denial of the spiritual (implicitly or explicitly, the message is that a true scientist must, by definition, be an atheist, and that faith is a foolish and primitive superstition).  You’d be hard pressed to find a mainstream mental health professional willing to call himself a “soul healer” or a “student of the soul” in English, though in Greek the claim is proudly printed on their business cards. .. (Click title for more)

 


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Personal Myths Bring Cohesion to the Chaos of Each Life

Personal Myths Bring Cohesion to the Chaos of Each Life | C.G Jung | Scoop.it

THE ancient myths are not dead; they live on in the stories people tell about their own lives.

While the old gods do not show up by name, they are there in spirit, in the struggles and triumphs that people depict as the key episodes in their lives.

New work by psychological researchers shows that in telling their life stories, people invent a personal myth, a tale that, like the myths of old, explains the meaning and goals of their lives. In doing so, they match - quite unwittingly - the characters and themes that are found in the old myths.

For example, one research subject, Tom H., depicted his life story as a saga in which he was a warrior like the Greek god Ares. Tom found himself in constant battle -with other children, relatives and people in authority. The main struggle of his life... (Click title to keep reading)

(Image by Nathaniel Bearson.)


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Jung: What Myth Do I Live By?

Jung: What Myth Do I Live By? | C.G Jung | Scoop.it

Jung, working with the psychotics, had become pretty well acquainted with what might be called the archetypology of unconscious imagination.

He began reading books on comparative myth: Frobenius, Bastian, Frazer.

 

The realization came to him that the imagery that his patients were finding welling up from their own psyches was precisely that with which the world of comparative mythologies and their history of religion studies were already familiar. The imagery of his patients’ fantasizing showed precise parallels to mythological themes. Jung then noticed that the parallels held true not only with psychotics but with neurotics and with relatively well-balanced people as well.

 

This discovery impressed him tremendously and motivated him to immerse himself in the study of mythology. Symbols of Transformation, which deals with the interrelationship between dream consciousness and the mythological consciousness of visions...(Click title for more)

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Shamanism, Alchemy and Yoga: Traditional Technologies of Tranformation

Shamanism, Alchemy and Yoga: Traditional Technologies of Tranformation | C.G Jung | Scoop.it

From the most ancient times, human beings have practiced disciplines of psychospiritual transformation with devoted energy and intention. Modern systems of psychotherapy are the inheritors of three great traditions of transformation, in which the human is seen as engaged in purposive processes of exploration and integration in many realms of consciousness. In this essay I describe some of the common methods used, as well as the major metaphors for transformation.1

One possible definition of shamanism is that it is the disciplined approach to what has been variously called "non-ordinary reality", "the sacred", "the mystery", "the supernatural", "the inner world(s)", or "the otherworld".

 

Psychologically speaking, one could say these expressions refer to realms of consciousness that lie outside the boundaries of our usual and ordinary perception. The depth psychologies derived from psychoanalysis refer to such normally inaccessible realms as "the unconscious", or "the collective unconscious". This would, however, be too limiting a definition for shamanism, if "unconscious" is taken to refer to something within the individual, i.e. intrapsychic. Shamanic practice involves the exploration not only of unknown aspects of our own psyche, but also the unknown aspects of the world around us, - the external as well as internal mysteries.

 

There are three traditional systems of consciousness... (Click title for more)


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Carol Sherriff's curator insight, August 8, 2014 5:04 AM

You don't usually get pscyhologists (or coaches and facilitators) admitting they draw on shamanism and alchemy, so this is refreshing reading.

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Mother World: splitting, integration & evolution in the mother archetype

Mother World: splitting, integration & evolution in the mother archetype | C.G Jung | Scoop.it

Carl Jung speaks of the human soul’s “longing to attain rebirth through a return to the womb, and to become immortal like the sun” (CW5, para. 312). In biblical terms rebirth is associated with entrance into Jerusalem. Jerusalem is the holy city, as image of the holy mother.

 

Jung says, “the Old Testament treats the cities of Jerusalem, Babylon, etc. just as if they were women” (para 303). While Jerusalem is an image of the holy mother, Babylon is the unholy mother. In Jung’s words: “Babylon is the symbol of the Terrible Mother” (Jung, para 315).

 

From a Kleinian perspective, the infant splits the mother image into two primitive forms: a ‘bad and persecuting’ form and a ‘loving and gratifying’ form. These two representations are internalized and become part of the psychic world.... (Click title for more)


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Carl Jung's Near Death Experience

Carl Jung's Near Death Experience | C.G Jung | Scoop.it

In a hospital in Switzerland in 1944, the world-renowned psychiatrist Carl G. Jung, had a heart attack and then a near-death experience. His vivid encounter with the light, plus the intensely meaningful insights led Jung to conclude that his experience came from something real and eternal. Jung’s experience is unique in that he saw the Earth from a vantage point of about a thousand miles above it. 

His incredibly accurate view of the Earth from outer space was described about two decades before astronauts in space first described it. Subsequently, as he reflected on life after death, Jung recalled the meditating Hindu from his near-death experience and read it as a parable of the archetypal Higher Self, the God-image within. Carl Jung, who founded analytical psychology, centered on the archetypes of the collective unconscious. The following is an excerpt from his autobiography


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Lessons of Jung's Encounter with Native Americans

Lessons of Jung's Encounter with Native Americans | C.G Jung | Scoop.it

In Memories, Dreams, Reflections (1973) Jung described his encounter with Native Americans he met in New Mexico in 1925.  This event, though brief, had a profound effect on Jung, and he referred to it many times in his writings. He commented that his experience in New Mexico made him aware of his imprisonment "in the cultural consciousness of the white man" (Jung, 1973, p. 247).

 

At the Taos pueblo, Jung spoke for the first time with a non-white, a Hopi elder named Antonio Mirabal (also known as Ochwiay Biano and Mountain Lake), who said that whites were always uneasy and restless: "We do not understand them. We think that they are mad" (Jung, 1973, p. 248). Jung asked him why he thought the whites were mad, and the reply was " 'They say that they think with their heads . . . . We think here,' he said, indicating his heart" (p. 248).

 

Impressed, Jung said he realized that Mountain Lake had unveiled a significant truth about whites. To Jung the Indians he met appeared to be tranquil and dignified, which Jung attributed to their belief that (as Mountain Lake explained) through their religious practice, they helped the sun cross the sky every day. Jung believed this belief and practice served the function of making the Indians' ... (Click title for more)


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Why the World Doesn't End - Michael Meade

Why the World Doesn't End - Michael Meade | C.G Jung | Scoop.it

Fears of the end have been with us from the very beginning. Endings and beginnings are mythic moments par excellence; they depict the extremes of existence and are the bookends of creation. There are countless stories of how it all began, and tales of apocalyptic endings can be found in many cultures.

 

Humans are naturally myth-makers and storytellers. We find our way by "storying" the world around us. We turn everything into a news story or a dramatic tale that helps make sense of the ever-changing, often threatening events of the world. Whether it is a major storm, a horrifying massacre, a new scandal or the threat of war, we look for elements of the story that can help us understand what is happening to us.

 

To be alive at this time means to be exposed to great uncertainty and to feel the raw forces of nature as well as the rough edges and sharp divisions of culture. It is not simply that the air has become dangerously polluted and overheated, or that the political atmosphere is increasingly poisonous and destructive. We live amidst rapid changes, increasing fears and devastating tragedies. We suffer increasing extremes that include... (click title for more)


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Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Memory of Emma Jung and Toni Wolff by Sallie Nichols

Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Memory of Emma Jung and Toni Wolff by Sallie Nichols | C.G Jung | Scoop.it
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Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung on Atlantis and Reincarnation

Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung on Atlantis and Reincarnation | C.G Jung | Scoop.it
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