BYOD iPads
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BYOD iPads
Looking at the implementation of iPads in Middle and High schools
Curated by Jenny Smith
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The Best K-12 Education Technology Blogs

The Best K-12 Education Technology Blogs | BYOD iPads | Scoop.it
Meet some of the best and brightest voices in education technology.

Via Ilkka Olander
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2 Predictions For The Future Of Education Technology - Edudemic

2 Predictions For The Future Of Education Technology - Edudemic | BYOD iPads | Scoop.it

While most startups begin with an honorable goal and worthwhile effort, most fail. That’s just the story of startups. We don’t have 4,000 different Facebooks, do we? There’s only one Instagram, Twitter, and Google. There are certainly copycats, spinoffs, and other versions of all these major players … but there’s only one big kahuna for each sector.


Via Ilkka Olander
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John Purificati's comment, April 1, 2013 9:29 AM
Thanks for this IIkka.
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Overcoming Teacher-technophobia in Four Steps

Overcoming Teacher-technophobia in Four Steps | BYOD iPads | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, March 4, 2013 12:53 PM

There it sits… showing off its silicon superiority and sleekness. Doesn’t matter if it’s an e-app or an i-thing; it’s there, reminding you that YOU, as a Digital Johnny or Janey-come-lately, don’t even know where to begin. (If you know what a Johnny-come-lately is, by the way, you’re in my age group.)

Everyone around you is tweeting and texting, swiping and blogging with devices that seem to get smaller with every passing year. More to the point, technology is now a category on your annual teacher evaluation. It probably reads something like: Integrates Technology. So, now, it’s part of your job. But what do you do when you just don’t know where to start? It is all so overwhelming!

I’m not going to throw a lot of tech-talk at you or even make suggestions as to what technology to use. I’m going to ask you to do something much more difficult. I’m going to ask you to:

1 . Have no fear

The mindset for working with technology requires that you understand that you can’t mess it (or them) up. Really. You can’t mess up an entire program by typing or clicking in the wrong place. It might make a loud noise or give you little warning, but you can’t break it. In fact, if you do manage to do some never-before-seen thing (which is incredibly unlikely), tech people are VERY interested in it because then, they can solve the glitch and be heroes. They like that kind of stuff. What’s really nifty keen is that whatever you DO do, can be fixed. Type in the wrong thing? Edit. Click on the wrong button? Go Back. No one is timing you. No one is counting how many times you mess up.

Those of us who remember rotary dials and typewriters, seem to have this sense of permanence about things. When we typed papers, we had to get it perfect or redo the whole thing. If we dialed one wrong number in a sequence, we had to hang up and start over. Technology is all about flexibility.

2. Embrace not knowing

This is a hard pill to swallow, I think. We like things spelled out, laid out for us. We are of the group who had manuals with instructions. However, with technology, you jump in and when you have a question, you seek the answer. There are HELP buttons and FAQs (frequently asked questions with answers). Sometimes, there’s even a handy reminder that pops up. Programs are designed to be used without knowing.

This is very different from the psychology of being told what to do and how to do it, which is how we were raised. You didn’t touch anything without fully understanding it. Your goal, now? Learn as you go.

Our children (and grandchildren), have learned how to not worry about not knowing. They put the game in the player, pick up the joystick and go, seeming to know exactly what they’re doing at every moment. They don’t. They just understand that it’s okay not to know because they’ll find out or figure it out.

3. Find a mentor who is in your age bracket

I don’t mean this facetiously. I mean it seriously. Young people, who are Digital Natives, are immersed in the technology culture; thus, they really don’t make the best explainers or motivators. They can (unintentionally) make you just feel inferior, just by their reactions: “You don’t know what a ‘mouse’ is? Really?”

That’s why finding a friend, who will talk in a way you understand, is key. Whoever this friend is, he or she should be comfortable with computers, those phones that can access the internet, iPads, and the internet, in general. Let this person know what you’re trying to do, and he/she will most likely have an experience that is similar. You are not alone!

4. Reinvent yourself as a Digital Pioneer

The pioneers who ventured out West had no idea what they were getting into. They planned as best they could, but for the most part, they figured things out as they went. This is where you are. You are neither Digital Immigrant nor Digital Native, but Digital Pioneer. It doesn’t matter that others have gone before you; this is undiscovered country for you. Discover this country for yourself and your students. You’ll do things you never thought you could do, and most importantly, you’ll meet students where they are…in their world.

You got this.

 

Mindy Kyriakides is National Board Certified Teacher in Language Arts for Adolescents and Young Adults. She began teaching at an urban, Title I school in 1998 and is now pursuing her Master’s degree in Higher Education. Her goal is to work with secondary teachers in teacher preparation programs to ease the transition into those crucial first years of working with teenagers. She and some of her former students published a book about their classroom experience: Transparent Teaching of Adolescents: Creating the Ideal Class for Students and Teachers. Mrs. Kyriakides also volunteers with Foster Care to Success, mentoring college students and is an advocate for the LGBT community. She dually resides in Cyprus and Florida.

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12 Stunning Infographics on Education, Technology & Social Media

12 Stunning Infographics on Education, Technology & Social Media | BYOD iPads | Scoop.it
12 Stunning Infographics on Education, Technology & Social Media | http://t.co/ghU5S9szuC via @degreesearch

Via Cindy Rudy
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6 Hot Trends in Educational Technology [#Infographic]

6 Hot Trends in Educational Technology [#Infographic] | BYOD iPads | Scoop.it
Where does your school stand when it comes to adopting the latest classroom innovations?
Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Erin Ryan's curator insight, October 11, 2015 6:15 PM

It scares me to think that education could be entirely digital eventually. There is so much to learn from a good discussion, face-to-face interactions with others, and from printed materials. I believe in the integration of technology but not for everything. I also wonder about those families (and YES they are out there) they do not have Internet access- how would that impact a student's learning?

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Why Teachers Want Technology [Infographic]

Why Teachers Want Technology [Infographic] | BYOD iPads | Scoop.it
Survey says educators view ed tech as a motivational tool.
Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Maggie Verster
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Mathew's curator insight, December 12, 2012 10:51 AM

My thoughts: I agree that teachers need to use technology more in class. But the teachers need to be trained in the use of the technology so they can teacher the class and how to use the technology. Because most teachers these days can’t use the computers and the other technology they have and that’s because they haven’t been trained or taught in how to use the technology. Also having technology and things that are more fun for the students will help them learn and make them want to come to school each day to learn. Right now school and classes are boring so having something different would help a bunch and it would make us want to learn and want to come to school. Also I think that if each kid was given a laptop for their entire school career that would help kids learn and it would also help them get their homework done and projects done on time. Some kids once they leave school they don’t have access to a computer so they can’t do their homework at home. But if they had a laptop they could start the homework and school and then when they get home they already have the worked start and they can work at it at home. Also sometimes if you start a project at school you can’t always get it home but if you had a laptop you could have it at home and be able to work on it and get it done for class the next day.

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10 Truths About Educational Technology | Amplify

10 Truths About Educational Technology | Amplify | BYOD iPads | Scoop.it

"Kids are generally very fast tech learners, indeed, but they don’t come to your room knowing as much as some would assert."


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Jeroen Bottema's curator insight, August 6, 2013 6:24 AM

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Computer Literacy:The Fourth Core Skill

Computer Literacy:The Fourth Core Skill | BYOD iPads | Scoop.it
True adult literacy is broader than merely reading and writing. Many adult basic education, pre-GED®, adult secondary education, and GED students are not computer literate.

Via Patty Ball
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12 Stunning Infographics on Education, Technology & Social Media

12 Stunning Infographics on Education, Technology & Social Media | BYOD iPads | Scoop.it
12 Stunning Infographics on Education, Technology & Social Media | http://t.co/ghU5S9szuC via @degreesearch

Via Cindy Rudy
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Real Innovation in Education Is About the Internet

Real Innovation in Education Is About the Internet | BYOD iPads | Scoop.it
We worry that many educators are unintentionally and subconsciously averse to weaving technology into the fabric of teaching and learning, simply because they do not see what doing so would look and feel like, and technology does not map onto to...
Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Charles Newton
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Evaluating the effective use of emerging technologies in education - Open Research Online

Evaluating the effective use of emerging technologies in education - Open Research Online | BYOD iPads | Scoop.it

The aim of this tutorial is to present practical guidance for evaluating the effectiveness of educational initiatives involving social software and emerging technologies to support student learning and engagement. Examples of such initiatives are: inclusion of a blog in a course to encourage reflective learning, or having a wiki in a course for fostering team-working skills, or an activity in a 3D virtual world to enable students to learn through simulations, or the use of Delicious for bookmarking resources, or an App on a smartphone. ‘Evaluation’ implies investigating the usability, pedagogical effectiveness (does it meet the learning outcomes?), student experience, and impact on direct stakeholders such as educators and technical support staff (in terms of workload and support required).


Via GRIAL Univ Salamanca, Mark Smithers, John Rudkin, Tony Parkin
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