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» Médicaments : le gouvernement encadre la vente sur Internet MyPharma Editions | L'Info Industrie & Politique de Santé

» Médicaments : le gouvernement encadre la vente sur Internet MyPharma Editions | L'Info Industrie & Politique de Santé | Buzz e-sante | Scoop.it
Marisol Touraine, la ministre des affaires sociales et de la santé , a présenté mercredi en Conseil des ministres, une ordonnance relative au renforcement de la sécurité de la chaîne d’approvisionnement des médicaments, à l’encadrement de la vente...
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Interview : Benoit Thieulin - Big data et santé | LEEM - Les entreprises du médicament

Interview : Benoit Thieulin - Big data et santé | LEEM - Les entreprises du médicament | Buzz e-sante | Scoop.it
Benoit Thieulin, président du Cnnum depuis le 13 janvier 2013, nous donne une définition rapide du Big Data et de ses enjeux pour les sujets liés ...
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Social media nightmare for health IT

Social media nightmare for health IT | Buzz e-sante | Scoop.it

Few healthcare IT policies these days are as delicate, sensitive and potentially emotionally explosive as efforts to restrict or regulate employee social media activity. And yet hospital hierarchies are routinely stepping on these political minefields as providers try to protect their reputations.

Consider a recent incident at the 2,478-bed New York Presbyterian Hospital.

An ER nurse posted a photograph of a trauma room – no staff or patients were in the picture – after caring for a man who had been hit by a subway train. The caption: "Man vs. 6 train." The image simply showed a room that had seen a lot of action moments before. The veteran nurse was fired after the incident, according to an ABC News report, not because she had breached hospital policy or violated HIPAA, but, as she put it: "I was told I was being fired for being insensitive."

This legitimately raises key issues around what a hospital's social media policy should be. This specific incident, though, appears to be an impressively poor choice for the hospital to have selected to make its stand. First, there really was no privacy issue at play. The photo shows nothing more than a slightly messy trauma room. The caption is vague and is hardly worse than a police officer posting a car accident image, with a note warning people against drinking/texting while driving. (To be precise, the injured car would be recognizable to the patient along with friends and family, especially if a license plate were visible, whereas a generic trauma room photo isn't.)

An even bigger problem with using this incident is that the nurse, Katie Duke, didn't even take that photograph. It was taken by a staff doctor and the doctor had posted it on the doctor's Instagram page. Nurse Duke had merely reposted it. The consistency killer? The doctor "was not reprimanded," ABCNews reported. To be fair, it's not clear whether the doctor's post included the "Man vs. 6 train" comment. Given that it appears that the comment – as opposed to the image – is the trigger here, the hospital's disciplinary process may or may not have been inconsistent.

Let's get back to the social media policy issues. I would hate to have to issue a concrete definition – acceptable to our friends in Legal – of "sensitivity." What if there had been no image and the nurse had simply said something like "A grim reminder at the ER today about how dangerous and deadly subways can be. Don't take any chances – ever." Is that insensitive? And if not, how is it meaningfully different than what Duke reposted? She specified the subway line, which, by itself, isn't insensitive nor especially revealing. And she used an image of the trauma center, which showed nothing. Would it have made any difference had she posted a generic trauma center image from Google Images?

If no patient or hospital privacy has been violated, what is the issue? The issue is that she was accused of violating hospital policy. We've now gone full circle. What is reasonable to ban, as long as no one's privacy nor hospital confidentiality is violated? (Classic hospital confidentiality: "Wow, my hospital is getting away with amazing markups. We just charged a patient $XXX for something, and I saw the paperwork that we only paid $X for it." The employee would be using information that she/he could only know because she worked there. That's a fine violation.)

Can a hospital ban employees from saying anything hospital-related on their social media posts? What if it's entirely positive, as in "Our surgical team is brilliant. We saved patients today that most surgeons would have lost"?

Here's the IT nightmare. What if the hospital says, "We're going to decide this on a case-by-base basis"? Danger, Will Robinson! Danger! Then things fall to IT to become the social media police. Are you to then track every social media feed of every employee and to then – gulp – review every posting for appropriateness? And somehow management thinks that this action will avoid lawsuits?

The simple fact is that a social media policy that covers what an employee does in his or her personal time is highly problematic. On the other hand, there certainly is social conduct that has to be dealt with. What if a doctor set up a site that identified herself as working at this identified hospital and then said how her team tries to inflict as much pain as possible and that they then place bets on when different patients will scream or pass out?

The easiest route from an administrative perspective – but certainly not from a legal perspective – is to adopt something akin to the Pentagon's infamous Don't Ask Don't Tell. That would be a program where there was zero effort to uncover such naughty social posts (as IT breathes a major sigh of relief) but a strict policy for punishing employees and contractors who engaged in bad behavior that the hospital happened to learn of.

The problem is that it leads to inconsistent punishment – with most people never getting caught – and to even vindictive behavior, with employees reviewing the social posts of a rival, looking for anything that might get them into trouble.

That policy might simply prohibit posts that reflect poorly on the hospital, which is vague enough to allow senior management to make customized decisions. As long as healthcare doesn't decide that it needs to proactively check on all posts – a thankless task that would almost certainly fall to IT, which would try to automate much of that assignment from Hell – any concrete policy is better than none.

 


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Patti Hamilton's curator insight, July 28, 12:17 PM

What is the real problem here?  Is it breach of confidentiality, heightened risk management by hospitals, limits to freedom of expression, or could it be the lack of sensitivity of doctors and nurses?

 

What is your opinion?

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Using Social Media to Improve Oncology Clinical Development and Recruitment

Using Social Media to Improve Oncology Clinical Development and Recruitment | Buzz e-sante | Scoop.it

Patient recruitment is one of the biggest challenges facing companies involved inoncology clinical development.

For example, a recent study by Cutting Edge Information finds that only 43% of surveyed companies achieved planned Phase 2 oncology enrollment. Recruitment problems can greatly delay clinical trials – sometimes by as long as 20 months – and these delays cost the company and deny oncology patients much-needed treatments. If only there were some avenue through which companies could reach large communities of patients just perfect for their trials.But wait – there is! It’s called social media, and – for pharma – it’s no longer a mystery, and it’s no longer off-limits. Every day patients congregate on Facebook, Twitter and other social media communities for education and support. Pharma can join hands with patients via these online groups and communicate with them about clinical trials.Through this engagement, patients learn about clinical trials around them and build relationships with companies that last beyond the trial duration. Though these methods are still new to pharma, a few studies and anecdotal evidence suggest that social media is more effective than traditional means of clinical trial patient recruitment – and it’s cheaper and faster (see here and here for examples).

For companies using social media, a Clinipace survey found that 54% of respondents believe online communities and advocacy groups are their most valuable channels for enrolling patients in oncology clinical trials. One such community is PatientsLikeMe – a social media site where patients meet to share stories, learn about treatment options and even input their own real world data (RWD).

Companies such as Sanofi and Genentech have partnered with PatientsLikeMe to gain access to a wide range of oncology patients (among other therapeutic areas). This set-up is a win-win for all parties: patients learn about relevant clinical trials, and companies can get the patient enrollment they need. It’s a no-brainer, right?

Well, as with everything in pharma, there are always precautions. Social media may put patient privacy — and trial integrity — at risk if companies and patients are not careful. Ken Getz, who led a Tufts study on social media and clinical trials, suggests that informed consent could encourage patients to be mindful of what they disclose online during clinical trials.

For those pharma organizations that are still hesitant to enter the social media landscape, the American Society of Clinical Oncology posted a Practical Guidance on using social media for various oncology practices – including clinical trials. With these guidelines in mind, pharma can jump into social media and reach out to oncology patients looking for clinical trials.

Source: http://www.cuttingedgeinfo.com/2014/social-media-oncology-clinical-development

 


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Douleurs chroniques : résultats encourageants d’un programme de "télé-gestion" des soins #Télémédecine

Douleurs chroniques : résultats encourageants d’un programme de "télé-gestion" des soins #Télémédecine | Buzz e-sante | Scoop.it
Les douleurs chroniques font partie des troubles médicaux les plus fréquents et invalidants. Les antalgiques font également partie des médicaments les plus utilisés, avec plus ou moins de succès

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Toshiba dévoile un objet connecté santé destiné aux médecins

Toshiba dévoile un objet connecté santé destiné aux médecins | Buzz e-sante | Scoop.it
Toshiba annonce un premier objet connecté dédié à la santé. Cet appareil d'un nouveau genre renfermera de nombreux capteurs spécifiques et sera adapté aux contraintes du monde médical.

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Romain DEFOY's curator insight, Today, 2:01 AM

Le capteur de santé de Toshiba intègre plusieurs capteurs perfectionnés permettant notamment de mesurer la température de la peau, la fréquence cardiaque, la position du corps (Comme leLumo Back) et les mouvements effectués par le malade. Toutes ces données de santé seront ensuite envoyées vers une application mobile dédiée à installer sur son smartphone ou sa tablette. Pour le moment on ignore si Toshiba rendra son capteur de santé connecté compatible avec les nouveaux protocoles HealthKit (Apple) ou Google Fit.

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Doctor Dictum: Beauty of mHealth is in Behavior Change

Doctor Dictum: Beauty of mHealth is in Behavior Change | Buzz e-sante | Scoop.it
Dr. Samir Damani, a cardiologist at Scripps Health and a physician-entrepreneur, believes there is much value in the proliferation of digital and mobile health

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Google X project aims to describe a healthy human, to make disease prevention easier

Google X project aims to describe a healthy human, to make disease prevention easier | Buzz e-sante | Scoop.it
The Baseline Study is a collaboration between the Google X “moonshot” organization and various clinical and academic partners. The work should fit in well with the health-monitoring aspects of Google’s wearable efforts.

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Santé connectée : entre fascination et inquiétudes

Santé connectée : entre fascination et inquiétudes | Buzz e-sante | Scoop.it

Gérer ses informations médicales à travers des applications est une pratique de plus en plus courante. A cet effet, l'exploitation et la sécurisation de ces données donnent matière à réflexion. Beaucoup d'utilisateurs se posent en effet la question, où iront toutes ces données ? Existe-t-il un cadre légal pour protéger ces informations à caractère personnel ?


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Digital Advances: Healthcare Professional Demand versus Pharmaceutical Industry Supply of Digital Resources

Digital Advances: Healthcare Professional Demand versus Pharmaceutical Industry Supply of Digital Resources | Buzz e-sante | Scoop.it
This 29-page research report is based on an independent study conducted in April 2014 by EPG Health Media, publisher of epgonline.org (the website for healthcare professionals).

The study includes two sample groups; 326 healthcare professionals (HCPs) and 146 pharmaceutical industry marketers (including pharma company and agency) and is designed to provide insight into factors surrounding HCP demand and pharma supply of digital resources.
- See more at: http://www.epghealthmedia.com/industry-reports/digital-demand-versus-supply/#sthash.EULwUre0.dpuf

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Sven Awege's curator insight, July 23, 3:51 AM

Some excellent insights in this free report.

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Four Ways to Help Patients Find Reliable Online Health Information

Four Ways to Help Patients Find Reliable Online Health Information | Buzz e-sante | Scoop.it

 

Most physicians agree that we have an ethical obligation to help educate our patients about what’s going on with their health, but what does that look like in a world overwhelmed with digital health information? And how do we budget appropriate time when we’re already struggling to balance shorter appointment times, more documentation requirements, and busier clinic schedules?

It’s estimated that 72 percent of patients get a majority of their health information online. With an abundance of biased and incorrect information on the Internet, our responsibility as physicians has evolved from simply teaching patients about their health conditions to now include educatingpatients on where and how to find and identify reliable health information.

This premise goes back to why I use social media. We have a responsibility to share, or at the very least be cognizant of, reliable health information in the realm where our patients seek it. In the old days that looked like an exam room; today it looks like a Google search.

Here are four ways to efficiently help ensure patients have the resources they need to find reliable health information, despite cramped clinic visits and time constraints.

Ask: How can you possibly know where patients find their information if you don’t ask? I have patients come in with birth plans all the time and quite frequently they’ve printed them out from a website with little-to-no additional research into the (often very specific) things they’ve requested. You can’t possibly know or understand their views unless you ask.

Take Two: I understand how limited our time is – I’m a resident with a busy clinic and short, often over-booked appointment slots. But taking two minutes to discuss reliable health information with your patients has great potential for improving patient care and decreasing un-needed visits and calls.

Prep: Have pre-written, condition-specific information for your patients and include curated links to additional reliable information for those who may want it. It’s as simple as a “dot-phrase” on most major EMR systems or a copy/paste file you can quickly email or print.

Encourage: Encourage your patients to take control of their health by being informed.Encourage them to ask questions and explain things back to you, so you’re certain they have a grasp on it. Encourage them to share what they’ve learned in their searches.


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Annemarie Nier's curator insight, July 21, 1:36 AM

Online marketing in the healthcare sector is all about helping patients find the information they need. Encourage them to ask the right questions, help them find the answers.

Zheng Pupeng Megan's curator insight, July 21, 9:04 PM

"Crap detection" is what we have learnt from being bombarded with a massive amount of information online. In a world where "Big Data" is our online reality now, it is difficult to differentiate what is useful data and what isn't.

 

Similar to the traditional steps learnt about "crap detection" - e.g. checking for credibility, this article effectively sums up "crap detection" of online health information in just 4 steps: ask, take two, prep, and encourage.

 

To know more about these 4 steps and what they are specifically, you'll have to read it to find out!

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Social media and GP recruitment are a perfect fit

Social media and GP recruitment are a perfect fit | Buzz e-sante | Scoop.it

Social media and GP recruitment are a perfect fit; recruiting is selling the story of your GP practice, a culture and a job. Social media is all about sharing stories using words, images and video.

Having conversations in the digital space is like having conversations in the real world. The only difference is that online conversations are searchable, archived and can come back to haunt you. Always bear this in mind. The positive of this is that it makes the conversations findable so people can join in. These people could be your future employees.

Indeed, the outcome of these conversations is to build a pool of GP and practice nurse candidates who want to engage with you, and more importantly, work for you before you have even told them there are jobs available within your practice.

Caution
If you have a bad reputation, a poor culture or unhappy staff then be wary of using social media. If your practice is not a positive place to work social media won’t change that – but it will give current and past employees a reason to jump on the social band wagon and create a trend you don’t want.

Be prepared for negative comments and complaints from users, patients and media. It is important when using social media to remain transparent, so respond to negative comments instead of deleting them. If you delete comments you will find users will move to another platform where you can’t manage the situation so easily.

Learning to use social media tools is not complicated, but does take time and experimentation. What works for one GP practice won’t always work for yours, so talk to individuals not the masses.

How to have an online conversation
The most difficult part of social recruiting is deciding what to talk about. Forget the fact that you are online, talk as you would talk in the real world.

Ask a lot of questions - listen to the responses and expand further;Tell great stories - people like hearing about people;Share interesting and useful insights;Show videos, images and documents that help tell the story; andDon’t just talk about yourself.

Think about the person you like to chat to the most, what do they talk about? They probably engage with you by asking lots of questions, sharing information about other people, places and experiences, and are approachable, funny and personable.

What can you talk about?
Try to create and share content that is interesting, funny, informative and relevant as you want people to pass it on.

Insider info: Offer insights into the culture of your practice. What is unique about you? Do you offer great training or strong career progression? Is it a fun place to work? What do employees do?Community news: Are you working in the local community? Do you work with local charities? Use this information to demonstrate the values and culture within your GP surgery.How to guides: These are useful information pieces on the practice, the roles within the company. Mix up words, images and video. Infographics are a great way to do this.Diary: A day in the life of different job roles within your surgery. Show the work involved, the people candidates would be working with, the building and department, give people a real flavour of what it would be like to work with you and bring your GP practice to life.Ask questions: Ask for other people’s tips and stories, encourage candidates to share experiences, ask current employees to comment or share their experiences.Jobs: Obviously the whole idea is to recruit people, so don’t forget to post jobs to this newly engaged audience all hoping to now work for you!


Bring out the humans
People don’t want to engage and interact with a GP surgery, they want to engage with the people who make it happen. So, don’t talk like a corporate press release, talk like a person, as you would in a face to face chat.


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Invasion de nano-puces, biométrie, géolocalisation, le Président de la CNIL dénonce et s'inquiète - YouTube

Alex Türk (Président de la Commission Nationale de l'Informatique et des Libertés), au Parlement Européen, tire la sonnette d'alarme : Il dit qu'il est dépas...

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Christophe Dollet's curator insight, July 18, 2:11 AM

Une salutaire mise en perspective des risques liées au développement des technologies de l'information couplées aux nanotechnologies. Alex Türk, le président de la Cnil réclame le droit pour chacun "à ce qu'on le laisse tranquille", et craint que demain on regrette Big Brother. " Parce qu'au moins, on peut se rebeller contre  une Stasi, mais pas contre des millions de puces lâchées dans la nature." 

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Novartis, Google to Develop 'Smart' Contact Lens

Novartis, Google to Develop 'Smart' Contact Lens | Buzz e-sante | Scoop.it
Swiss drugmaker Novartis has struck an agreement with Google to develop “smart” contact lenses that would help diabetics to track their blood glucose levels or restore the eye'...

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COM SALUD's curator insight, July 17, 1:57 AM

Cada día aparecen nuevos dispositivos que pueden incorporarse al cuerpo y que mejoran la calidad de vida. Los cyborg serán una realidad en pocos años.

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Big Data Peeps At Your Medical Records To Find Drug Problems

Big Data Peeps At Your Medical Records To Find Drug Problems | Buzz e-sante | Scoop.it

It's been tough to identify the problems that only turn up after medicines are on the market. An experimental project is now combing through data to get earlier, more accurate warnings.

 

No one likes it when a new drug in people's medicine cabinets turns out to have problems — just remember the Vioxx debacle a decade ago, when the painkiller was removed from the market over concerns that it increased the risk of heart attack and stroke.

 

To do a better job of spotting unforeseen risks and side effects, the Food and Drug Administration is trying something new — and there's a decent chance that it involves your medical records.

 

It's called Mini-Sentinel, and it's a $116 million government project to actively go out and look for adverse events linked to marketed drugs. This pilot program is able to mine huge databases of medical records for signs that drugs may be linked to problems.

 

The usual system for monitoring the safety of marketed drugs has real shortcomings. It largely relies on voluntary reports from doctors, pharmacists, and just plain folks who took a drug and got a bad outcome.

 

"We get about a million reports a year that way," says Janet Woodcock, the director of the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. "But those are random. They are whatever people choose to send us."

 more at http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2014/07/21/332290342/big-data-peeps-at-your-medical-records-to-find-drug-problems?sc=tw 
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Technology-based mobile health takes off in developing counties

Technology-based mobile health takes off in developing counties | Buzz e-sante | Scoop.it
Accessible healthcare solutions that use just a mobile phone are being used simultaneously by patients in both developing and developed markets

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Smartwatches will revolutionise treatment for chronic conditions

Smartwatches will revolutionise treatment for chronic conditions | Buzz e-sante | Scoop.it
Google, Apple, and Samsung are racing to develop wearable technology that could be used to to monitor and track personal health and diagnose disease, explains Chris Duffey

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ChemaCepeda's curator insight, July 28, 7:43 AM

¿Se convertirán estos dispositivos de cuantificación en tecnologías de acercamiento? Aún les queda mucho camino por recorrer, aunque seguro que vemos cosas interesantes

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Five things that are missing from digital health

Five things that are missing from digital health | Buzz e-sante | Scoop.it

1. A practical digital health fellowship for providers and post-graduates

2. True interoperability

3. More women in leadership positions

4. A more robust representation of people involved in healthcare

5. A Hippocratic oath for the digital age


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Andrew Spong's curator insight, July 31, 4:23 AM

All sound enough observations.

 

Would any of them have made your top five?

 

Right now, mine would include:

 

1. A primary focus on patient outcomes as the driver of innovation

2. A secondary focus on reducing the personal and economic burden of care

3. A strong emphasis on design and the promotion of user uptake, utilisation, and retention

4. Interoperability (my definition includes not just connected systems, but also integrated workflows, and assumes a commitment to promoting open, anonymised data)

5. Dialogue: by which I do not mean ceaseless pronouncements about the seductive distractions of novelty, but rather the nurturing of ongoing, iterative, analytic discussions between designers, healthcare systems, clinicians, and users regarding objectives and outcomes (as well as the UX and UI) at every stage of the developmental process -- before, during, and after initiation

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Virtual reality could give therapists a window into how patients experience stress

Virtual reality could give therapists a window into how patients experience stress | Buzz e-sante | Scoop.it

A combination of virtual reality and therapy, referred to as "interreality," may help therapist better understand how patients react to stress. 

 

Researchers say the hybrid therapy known as “interreality” was more effective than traditional cognitive behavioral therapy, which is currently considered the gold standard for more serious anxiety or post traumatic stress disorders


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Five Big NoNos for Physician Social Media Marketing

As we’ve noted before, Social Media marketing is changing the game for physicians in cosmetic practice. Whether you’re a plastic surgeon, cosmetic dermatologist or Medspa owner, these stats from theInternational Association of Physicians in Aesthetic Medicine say it all:

“42 percent of patients received most of their information about cosmetic procedures from social media [in 2012].”

But it’s not all wine and roses when it comes to social media marketing and physicians. It’s true that, done well, social media can be incredibly effective for sharing information, building engagement, identifying new patients, and keeping current patients engaged. Done poorly, however, social media can hurt your reputation, alienate patients and hinder practice growth.

Here are five tips to help prevent your social media practices from turning your aesthetic or wellness practice into a digital version of What not to Wear.

Five biggest turnoffs in social media:

Irrelevant content: The first rule of social media marketing is to provide interesting and relevant content. So think before you post. Is this something that will inform and interest my patients, specifically? Increase their engagement with the practice? Get them thinking about that next service or new product? If none of the above applies, perhaps it’s not the right forum for that post. Fortunately, those who work in aesthetic, cosmetic and health and wellness practices typically have lots of great content to share.

A hard sell: Have an offer or promotion? That’s great. Patients who are interested in your services will be thrilled. But make sure you don’t sell too hard. Offer relevant content about a common patient problem or concern.  Skip the sales pitch until the end. Let the products or services stand for themselves as solutions to issues you raise – and that your patients care about already.

Poor spelling and grammar: Want somebody to tune out your message? Then don’t bother to check your spelling and / or grammar. Those who follow you or read your posts will make assumptions about your overall professionalism and question the value of your brand. Of course, mistakes inevitably happen; just make sure they happen infrequently. When you do see an error, fix it. Immediately.

Repetition, repetition, repetition: Don’t keep repeating the same message over and over again. According to one survey, more than half of people on Facebook and Twitter report that repetition turns them off.  Most aesthetic, cosmetic and health and wellness practices offer multiple services, much of them quite cutting edge and interesting to large numbers of people. Draw on that variety to showcase the broader message: Have x problem?Here’s how you can look and / or feel your absolute best.

Controversy and / or poor taste: We like to think that this is an obvious one, but sadly it’s not. Do not post anything that could potentially alienate the very people you want to attract. Our advice? Avoid any post involving politics, local or otherwise. The views you have and believe to be self-evident may not be shared by your patients, current or future. Never use inappropriate language. Watch out for questionable humor. Finally, if you’re not sure, don’t share.

We hope this helps you as you begin working on your social media strategy. For more ideas on how to manage your digital image, see this blog about digital marketing platforms. For another perspective on what not to wear on social media, see this slide presentation from Forbes.

 


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SmartStop, un patch anti-tabac connecté et intelligent

SmartStop, un patch anti-tabac connecté et intelligent | Buzz e-sante | Scoop.it
Alors que les substituts à la nicotine sous forme de patchs diffusent en continu la substance dont raffolent les fumeurs, un nouvel appareil appelé SmartStop anticipe la sensation de manque et diffuse la nicotine avant que le besoin de fumer ne se...

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Can Mobile Technologies and Big Data Improve Health?

Can Mobile Technologies and Big Data Improve Health? | Buzz e-sante | Scoop.it

After decades as a technological laggard, medicine has entered its data age. Mobile technologies, sensors, genome sequencing, and advances in analytic software now make it possible to capture vast amounts of information about our individual makeup and the environment around us. The sum of this information could transform medicine, turning a field aimed at treating the average patient into one that’s customized to each person while shifting more control and responsibility from doctors to patients.

 

The question is: can big data make health care better?

 

“There is a lot of data being gathered. That’s not enough,” says Ed Martin, interim director of the Information Services Unit at the University of California San Francisco School of Medicine. “It’s really about coming up with applications that make data actionable.”

 

The business opportunity in making sense of that data—potentially $300 billion to $450 billion a year, according to consultants McKinsey & Company—is driving well-established companies like Apple, Qualcomm, and IBM to invest in technologies from data-capturing smartphone apps to billion-dollar analytical systems. It’s feeding the rising enthusiasm for startups as well.

 

Venture capital firms like Greylock Partners and Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, as well as the corporate venture funds of Google, Samsung, Merck, and others, have invested more than $3 billion in health-care information technology since the beginning of 2013—a rapid acceleration from previous years, according to data from Mercom Capital Group. 

  more at http://www.technologyreview.com/news/529011/can-technology-fix-medicine/ ;
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Paul's curator insight, July 24, 9:06 AM

Yes - but bad data/analysis can harm it

Pedro Yiakoumi's curator insight, July 24, 10:48 AM

http://theinnovationenterprise.com/summits/big-data-boston-2014

Vigisys's curator insight, July 27, 1:34 AM

La collecte de données de santé tout azimut, même à l'échelle de big data, et l'analyse de grands sets de données est certainement utile pour formuler des hypothèses de départ qui guideront la recherche. Ou permettront d'optimiser certains processus pour une meilleure efficacité. Mais entre deux, une recherche raisonnée et humaine reste indispensable pour réaliser les "vraies" découvertes. De nombreuses études du passé (bien avant le big data) l'ont démontré...

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Applis mobiles, alliées des professionnels de santé | Santé autrement magazine

Applis mobiles, alliées des professionnels de santé | Santé autrement magazine | Buzz e-sante | Scoop.it

Disponibles à tout moment, peu encombrantes, les applications mobiles destinées aux médecins et aux infirmières fleurissent sur les smartphones.

Elles les accompagnent dans le choix d’un médicament, d’un type de pansement, le calcul de doses ou le suivi des patients. Les premiers « trophées de la santé mobile », décernés en janvier 2014, ont distingué de nombreuses applications, destinées aux patients et aux professionnels de santé.

 


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Données personnelles : 61% des français font confiance à leurs organismes de santé

Données personnelles : 61% des français font confiance à leurs organismes de santé | Buzz e-sante | Scoop.it
Un sondage réalisé par FICO, leader mondial de la gestion décisionnelle, montre que 56% des personnes à travers le monde déclarent faire confiance à leurs organismes de santé dans la gestion de leurs données personnelles.

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What will the IBM-Apple partnership mean for healthcare? | mobihealthnews

What will the IBM-Apple partnership mean for healthcare? | mobihealthnews | Buzz e-sante | Scoop.it

Apple didn’t choose just any partner for its enterprise bid. IBM itself is no stranger to healthcare, after all, it made healthcare the flagship use case for Watson, the data intelligence processor that mimics human thinking and learning well enough that it managed to beat the best Jeopardy champions back in 2011. It’s been providing backup support for oncologists ever since. IBM knows how to manage data in a healthcare setting.


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ProTransport-1 to Deploy Google Glass in Ambulances and Mobile Medicine Units

ProTransport-1 to Deploy Google Glass in Ambulances and Mobile Medicine Units | Buzz e-sante | Scoop.it

ProTransport-1, a Northern California based medical transport provider has announced a software partnership with CrowdOptic, maker of mobile and wearable broadcasting solutions to deploy the CrowdOptic Google Glass broadcasting solution in its ambulances and mobile medicine units.

 

ProTransport-1 will use CrowdOptic’s software solution that will allow paramedics and nurses to broadcast through Google Glass a live view of complex cases from the ambulance to medical teams at the receiving hospital during transport. According to the press release, the companies aim to “improve documentation and expand medical consultative opportunities for patients en route.

 

“CrowdOptic’s see-what-I-see technology allows paramedics and nurses on our ambulances to broadcast the live view of complex cases to medical teams at the hospital”, said Glenn Leland, Chief Strategy Officer for ProTransport-1.

 

Additionally, ProTransport-1 envisions multiple opportunities to utilize CrowdOptic’s software particularly in the mobile medical setting by enabling a two-way educational forum between a patient in their home and providers.  “We additionally envision a variety of dispatch, navigation, documentation and operational processes will migrate to CrowdOptic and Google Glass over time” said Glenn Leland, Chief Strategy Officer for ProTransport-1.



more at http://hitconsultant.net/2014/07/18/protransport-1-to-deploy-google-glass-in-ambulances/


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ChemaCepeda's curator insight, July 18, 4:41 AM

Una de las múltiples utilidades de las Google Glass en salud es su aplicación en el ámbito de las emergencias, como forma de transmisión de información en directo a las centrales de coordinación, como para soporte visual durante el tratamiento de los pacientes. ¿Acabaremos llevándolas como un dispositivo de trabajo más?

Marco Antonio Gonzalez's curator insight, July 18, 8:25 AM

Google Glass in Emergency

RixhPlayZ's curator insight, July 22, 1:24 AM

Smart Doctor That uses Google Glasses.!!

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L'open data et la santé en France - les Echos

L'open data et la santé en France - les Echos | Buzz e-sante | Scoop.it

À l’instar des big data, l’open data ou "données ouvertes" est un sujet incontournable de ces dernières années qui consiste à mettre à disposition de tous, facilement (sans restriction technique, juridique ou financière) et gratuitement des données numériques, produites par une collectivité ou un service public.


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