Butterflies in my head
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Personal Learning Networks: Knowledge Sharing as Democracy | Collaboration | HYBRID PEDAGOGY

Personal Learning Networks: Knowledge Sharing as Democracy | Collaboration | HYBRID PEDAGOGY | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it
Hybrid Pedagogy is an academic and networked journal of teaching and technology that combines the strands of critical and digital pedagogy to arrive at the best social and civil uses of technology and digital media in education.
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"Underlying the development of a PLN is the need for individual learners to be able to have the capacity for self-direction, which requires a higher level of learning maturity—an absence of which may represent a barrier for a percentage of adults to learn in this way. Also crucially important for networked learning is the level of development of individuals’ digital and webliteracies in order for members to optimally filter out ‘noise’ and contribute to the health of the network. Although approaches to and experiences when establishing a PLN may vary, individuals seeking to build one may wish to first self-assess their own abilities to learn and share within networks before seeking out others with similar interests."

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Noam Chomsky Spells Out the Purpose of Education

Noam Chomsky Spells Out the Purpose of Education | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it
E + ducere: “To lead or draw out.” The etymological Latin roots of “education.” According to a former Jesuit professor of mine, the fundamental sense of the word is to draw others out of “darkness,” into a “more magnanimous view” (he’d say, his...
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Philosophy for eight year-olds: If a pig could talk, should you eat it? - Telegraph

Philosophy for eight year-olds: If a pig could talk, should you eat it?  - Telegraph | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it
Christopher Middleton visits a school where the pupils are tackling life’s big questions in a philosophy club.
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Philosophy the answer for curious kids?

Philosophy the answer for curious kids? | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it

University of Washington’s Professor Sara Goering said at a recent TED talk that children are naturally searching for meaning. “Philosophy’s meant to be this deep, abstract, rigourous, difficult kind of discpline. People don’t think children are capable of doing it. When they look at me like I’m crazy for doing it, I’m like, you’re wrong. Kids are actually very natural philosophers. They ask these kinds of questions on their own and it’s our job to give them uptake on those types of questions.”

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P4C Background & Benefits - University of Saskatchewan

P4C Background & Benefits - University of Saskatchewan | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it

The site also includes another talk by Sara Goering: Making a Place for Philosophy in Schools: How and Why

Public lecture at the University of Saskatchewan

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Struggle For Smarts? How Eastern And Western Cultures Tackle Learning : NPR

Interesting article on approaches to learning in different cultures. (except for the unfortunate use of the East/West labels)

 

"For the most part in American culture, intellectual struggle in school children is seen as an indicator of weakness, while in Eastern cultures it is not only tolerated, it is often used to measure emotional strength."

"I think that from very early ages we [in America] see struggle as an indicator that you're just not very smart," Stigler says. "It's a sign of low ability — people who are smart don't struggle, they just naturally get it, that's our folk theory. Whereas in Asian cultures they tend to see struggle more as an opportunity."

"Think about that [kind of behavior] spread over a lifetime," he says. "That's a big difference."

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The Agricultural Revolution: Crash Course World History #1

Stimulating, Informing and Hilarious or brilliant in short.

 

Program "In which John Green investigates the dawn of human civilization. John looks into how people gave up hunting and gathering to become agriculturalists, and how that change has influenced the world we live in today. Also, there are some jokes about cheeseburgers."

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Pedagogy: Lifting the lid on common teaching myths - TES New Teachers

Pedagogy: Lifting the lid on common teaching myths - TES New Teachers | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it

Down to earth advice on how to deal with your classroom. You'll find the same advice in many academic texts but hardly as easy to understand as here.

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CYP/Interview with Gareth Matthews

CYP/Interview with Gareth Matthews | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it

Gareth Matthews—Professor emeritus in Philosophy at University of Massachusetts Amherst—has taught and published widely in the areas of ancient and medieval philosophy and the philosophy of religion. His latest two books are Socratic Perplexity and the Nature of Philosophy (Oxford, 1999) and Augustine (Blackwell, 2005). He has also been a pioneer in thinking, writing, and teaching about philosophy and children. His three books in this area—Philosophy and the Young Child (1980), Dialogues with Children (1984), and The Philosophy of Childhood (1994)—have been translated into a dozen languages, including Chinese, Japanese, and Indonesian, as well as various European languages. He has conducted philosophy discussions with elementary-school children in Austria, Australia, China, Israel, Germany, Japan, Norway, Scotland and in the USA.

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Good reasoning needn’t make you an unfeeling robot

Good reasoning needn’t make you an unfeeling robot | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it

Some interesting recent research using neuroimaging gives us evidence that different brain systems activate in different reasoning situations.

There are two brain networks, called in the literature the “Default Mode Network” and the “Task Positive Network” – and it was shown these activate in different reasoning situations, but rarely together.

Simply put: the more tools we have at our disposal, and the more comfortable we are with them, the better we’ll reason. If you are used to thinking in different ways, you’ll be able to choose the thinking tool that suits. This is what we do when we teach people to think critically and creatively.

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Philosophical Questions Blog

Philosophical Questions Blog | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it

The official blog of the Institute for Philosophy in Public Life and Why? Philosophical Discussions About Everyday Life, this site is dedicated to the exploration of philosophy. Everyone can join in regardless of expertise or credentials. Be thoughtful and respectful, courageous and interesting, and post your comments to converse with the world. And please, enjoy yourself.

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Critical Pedagogy

Critical Pedagogy | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it

Worth Checking out: Critical Pedagogy Pinterest Site with links to many different resources.

Motto: "The unexamined life is not worth living." Socrates

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Free online course by the University of Edinburgh: Introduction to Philosophy

Free online course by the University of Edinburgh: Introduction to Philosophy | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it

This course will introduce you to some of the most important areas of research in contemporary philosophy. Each week a different philosopher will talk you through some of the most important questions and issues in their area of expertise.

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For a Better Society, Teach Philosophy in High Schools

For a Better Society, Teach Philosophy in High Schools | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it
Why philosophy? Because the study of philosophy, the "love of wisdom," creates and nurtures thoughtful minds, minds that can -- as Aristotle suggests -- entertain a thought without accepting it.
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Embodied Cognition: Science of Creativity Moves Into the Body

Embodied Cognition: Science of Creativity Moves Into the Body | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it

"The artist takes the body with her," Maurice Merleau-Ponty noted a few decades ago. The rest of the body—movement, gesture, musculature, autonomic functions—shapes how thought happens. At least that’s what some scientists are tracking. The implications could be significant for how we learn, create, and work.

Here are five big “embodied creativity” ideas and their trackers to watch.

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Philosophy in Education: An Introduction to Philosophy for Children - University of Saskatchewan

Course on P4C at the University of Saskatchewan based on Lipman's 'Thinking in Education'

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Will Ord – Philosophy For Children

P4C aims to encourage children (or adults) to think critically, caringly, creatively and collaboratively. It helps teachers to build a 'community of enquiry' where participants create and enquire into their own questions, and 'learn how to learn' in the process. Reassuringly, P4C has a considerable pedigree; it has been developed over the last 30 years and is now practised in 60 countries.

DOWNLOAD SOME P4C RESOURCES and articles for free from the menu on the right. There are practical tips, resources and more information on offer. Alternatively, check the links page on this site to find a selection of helpful P4C websites (such as www.sapere.org.uk and others).

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Culturally Responsive Pedagogy Enhances Student Achievement

Culturally Responsive Pedagogy Enhances Student Achievement | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it

"In an important article in Education Week, Willis D. Hawley and Jacqueline Jordan Irvine, explain why students’ cultural identities are integral to “measuring” teacher effectiveness"

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World Philosophy Day 2012 | UNESCO "Future Generations"

World Philosophy Day 2012 | UNESCO "Future Generations" | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it

"In 2012, the World Philosophy Day will be held on Thursday, 15 November for the tenth time. For UNESCO, philosophy offers a cross-cutting reflection and analysis that should permeate all disciplines which aim to build a better understanding of our present world and develop adequate responses to challenges. Philosophers have a very important role in shedding light on contemporary challenges, especially when these relate to ethics and justice. We believe that critical thinking, foresight, and ethical judgment are invaluable ingredients for a healthy society. For this reason UNESCO strives to strengthen the philosophical perspective in all its programmes and fields of action."

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P4C Argentina: Filosofía para Niños

P4C Argentina: Filosofía para Niños | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it
CENTRO DE INVESTIGACIONES EN EL PROGRAMA INTERNACIONAL FILOSOFÍA PARA NIÑOS (C.I.Fi.N) Buenos Aires (Argentina)
Recognized by the Institute for the Advancement of Philosofy for Children (IAPC), New Jersey (EE.UU.).

 

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Social Relationships and the Emergence of Social Networks

Social Relationships and the Emergence of Social Networks | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it

In complex social systems such as those of many mammals, including humans, groups (and hence ego-centric social networks) are commonly structured in discrete layers. We describe a computational model for the development of social relationships based on agents' strategies for social interaction that favour more less-intense, or fewer more-intense partners. A trust-related process controls the formation and decay of relationships as a function of interaction frequency, the history of interaction, and the agents' strategies. A good fit of the observed layers of human social networks was found across a range of model parameter settings. Social interaction strategies which favour interacting with existing strong ties or a time-variant strategy produced more observation-conformant results than strategies favouring more weak relationships. Strong-tie strategies spread in populations under a range of fitness conditions favouring wellbeing, whereas weak-tie strategies spread when fitness favours foraging for food. The implications for modelling the emergence of social relationships in complex structured social networks are discussed.

photo: Alice/Cornelia Kopp via flickr

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Chall Lecture: Culturally Responsive Pedagogy | Harvard Graduate School of Education

Chall Lecture: Culturally Responsive Pedagogy | Harvard Graduate School of Education | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it

Can using a student’s own culture in literacy instruction make a difference? According to Vanderbilt University Professor Robert Jiménez, Culturally Responsive Pedagogy (CRP) can transform literacy education for students of diverse backgrounds.

During his talk at the eighth annual Jeanne S. Chall Lecture held on Thursday, October 25, Jimenez provided an outline of this research in his presentation entitled “Optimal Outfitting: The Continuing Relevance of Culturally Responsive Instruction.” “We need to bring outside linguistics inside the classroom,” he said, as a means to provide more equitable learning to students of diverse backgrounds.

Read more: http://www.gse.harvard.edu/news-impact/2012/10/jeanne-chall-lecture-focuses-on-culturally-responsive-pedagogy/#ixzz2BFTdmmwm

Prof Jimenez: http://peabody.vanderbilt.edu/bio/robert-jimenez ;

 

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Philosophy for Children Alberta

Philosophy for Children Alberta | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it

Founded in Spring 2008 by Professor Rob Wilson, Philosophy for Children Alberta (P4CA) is an associate organization within of the University of Alberta’s Faculty of Arts. The core of P4CA is an innovative team that includes undergraduate and graduate students, professors, teachers, and community members dedicated to carrying out the two-part mission of P4CA:
Develop critical thinking skills, creativity, and caring communities through philosophical inquiry programs.

Promote the Philosophy for Children Program as an exemplary method of achieving #1.

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James Nottingham on Labels Limit Learning.

Educational consultant James Nottingham draws attention to the problem of labelling children - even when those labels seem positive. He describes the impact of labels - good and bad - on student expectations and how this affects learning. He then offers us alternatives - to focus on student progress (rather than rank order) and to use labels to describe actions rather than people.

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