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Trees of Life: A Visual History of Evolution

Trees of Life: A Visual History of Evolution | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it

Since the dawn of recorded history, humanity has been turning to the visual realm as a sensemaking tool for the world and our place in it, mapping and visualizing everything from the body to the brain to the universe toinformation itself. Trees of Life: A Visual History of Evolution (public library) catalogs 230 tree-like branching diagrams, culled from 450 years of mankind’s visual curiosity about the living world and our quest to understand the complex ecosystem we share with other organisms, from bacteria to birds, microbes to mammals.

 
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Interesting links with complexity thinking. Also check the link below for more on knowledge networks and connectivity.

http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2012/01/16/manuel-lima-the-power-of-networks/ ;

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Sophia - European Foundation for the Advancement of Doing Philosophy with Children

Sophia - European Foundation for the Advancement of Doing Philosophy with Children | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it

SOPHIA is at heart a welcoming, open and inclusive community of people who practice philosophy with children  [pwc] in Europe. Philosophy with Children is a general term which encompasses different methodologies for engaging children in group discussion and dialogue about philosophical topics which interest the children. All Philosophy with children methodologies develop critical and creative thinking and increase confidence in the children, and simultaneously transform the groups of children into communities in which everyone is equally respected. 

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Social Relationships and the Emergence of Social Networks

Social Relationships and the Emergence of Social Networks | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it

In complex social systems such as those of many mammals, including humans, groups (and hence ego-centric social networks) are commonly structured in discrete layers. We describe a computational model for the development of social relationships based on agents' strategies for social interaction that favour more less-intense, or fewer more-intense partners. A trust-related process controls the formation and decay of relationships as a function of interaction frequency, the history of interaction, and the agents' strategies. A good fit of the observed layers of human social networks was found across a range of model parameter settings. Social interaction strategies which favour interacting with existing strong ties or a time-variant strategy produced more observation-conformant results than strategies favouring more weak relationships. Strong-tie strategies spread in populations under a range of fitness conditions favouring wellbeing, whereas weak-tie strategies spread when fitness favours foraging for food. The implications for modelling the emergence of social relationships in complex structured social networks are discussed.

photo: Alice/Cornelia Kopp via flickr

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