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TED-Dr. Sara Goering - Philosophy for Kids: Sparking a Love of Learning

Dr. Sara Goering is Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Member of the Program on Values in Society, and Program Director for the Northwest Center for Philosop...
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A guide to philosophical enquiry in the primary classroom

A guide to philosophical enquiry in the primary classroom | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it
"Miss, are we here for a reason?" Lisa Naylor explains how she encourages her primary students to debate life's big questions
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Philosophy belongs in the core curriculum // The Observer

Philosophy belongs in the core curriculum // The Observer | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it
I will never forget when my Introduction to Philosophy seminar professor taught me that “which begs the question” was not just a flashy phrase I used to introduce new paragraphs in my ACT Writing section. It turned out that begging the question was a specific kind of circular logical fallacy, and I had been using
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Why tyrants are afraid of art and beauty

Why tyrants are afraid of art and beauty | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it
Beauty - and art - are as necessary for our survival as food and water, argues AL Kennedy.
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The beauty of dialogical play in a community of philosophical inquiry is that from it emerges an intimate space that can be inhabited even after the physical inquiry has finished.
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Great Critical Thinking Map for your Classroom ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Great Critical Thinking Map for your Classroom ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it
Great Critical Thinking Map for your Classroom ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning http://t.co/cFMomGw0vd
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Then try to think about ways to connect this with material you are using in the classroom. How will you operationalize these skills? This requires careful facilitation.
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The Year in Poems - The New Yorker

The Year in Poems - The New Yorker | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it

Every year, The New Yorker publishes approximately a hundred original poems. Here are a few highlights from 2014.

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Lovely to think of a year in poems.

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A better translation of critical thinkingOpinion - China Daily Asia

A Better Translation Of Critical Thinking - China Daily Asia http://t.co/WFQgbniFHf
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One example is to think of indigenous perspectives from where the term critical might be understood as doubting authority. You have to ask yourself how this term can be interpreted.
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Ireland: O’Sullivan signals philosophy to be taught in schools

Ireland: O’Sullivan signals philosophy to be taught in schools | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it
Plan for course in philosophical ‘concepts and ideas’ as part of junior cycle changes
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What is Philosophy for? - YouTube

From a distance philosophy seems weird, irrelevant, boring - yet also intriguing. SUBSCRIBE to our channel for new films every week: http://tinyurl.com/o28mu...
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His brain, her brain?

His brain, her brain? | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it

There is a long history of scientific inquiry about what role biological sex plays in differences between brain function in human males and females. Greater knowledge of the influence of biological sex on the human brain promises much-needed insights into brain function and especially dysfunctions that differentially affect the sexes (1). Certainly, advancing technologies and an increasing wealth of data (with more sophisticated analyses) should prompt robust future research—carefully conducted and well replicated—that can elucidate sex effects in the brain. However, this field of research has spurred an equally long history of debate as to whether inherent differences in brains of males and females predispose the sexes to stereotypical behaviors, or whether such claims reinforce and legitimate traditional gender stereotypes and roles in ways that are not scientifically justified—so-called neurosexism. Although this topic remains controversial, a commonly held belief is that the psyches of females and males are highly distinct. These differences are perceived as natural, fixed, and invariant across time and place (2), presumably due to unique female versus male brain circuitry that is largely fixed by a sexually differentiated genetic blueprint. A major challenge in the field is to crtically view previous experimental findings, as well as design future studies, outside the framework of this dichotomous model. Here, gender scholarship can hasten scientific progress by revealing the implicit assumptions that can give rise to inadvertent neurosexism.His brain, her brain? Cordelia FineScience 21 November 2014: Vol. 346 no. 6212 pp. 915-916 http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1262061


Via Complexity Digest
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Saberes Sin Fronteras OVS's curator insight, November 30, 2014 5:47 PM

Hay que seguir estudiando las relaciones entre género y actividad cerebral

Tammy Sykes's curator insight, January 1, 11:06 AM

Is gender biological or socially learned. Research is quoted in the article. 

 

Module 1 - SOCI 330

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Thought experiments: the films that turn us into philosophers

Thought experiments: the films that turn us into philosophers | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it
Showbusiness is about entertainment, right? Film-going should be fun. We want to laugh or squeal or sigh as emotion arises in us when the music swells and the camera zooms in for an extreme close up…
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The Philosophy of Creativity

The Philosophy of Creativity | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it
This collection of new essays on creativity integrates philosophical insights with empirical research.
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Can you learn to be creative?

Can you learn to be creative? | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it
Is creativity magical? Not according to those now teaching it as a skill, discovers Colin Barras. Are there really secrets to unlocking your imagination?
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Philosophy sessions 'boost primary school results' - BBC News

Philosophy sessions 'boost primary school results' - BBC News | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it
A study suggests primary school results are boosted by weekly philosophy sessions.
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Philosophy in Schools: A Catholic School Perspective - WHITTLE - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Education - Wiley Online Library

Philosophy in Schools: A Catholic School Perspective - WHITTLE - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Education - Wiley Online Library | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it
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Reflections: BC Curriculum & Competency Development | teachertong

Reflections: BC Curriculum & Competency Development | teachertong | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it
gr8!“@teachertong: New Post: Thoughts on the BC Curriculum/Competency Development from yesterday’s session http://t.co/UkfZDp2Ey2 #fhlearn
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Wonderful reflection on curriculum development in BC. No matter which course at what level you teach, as a teacher you can have a profound impact on the way your students experience their lifeworld.
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Just how important was Magna Carta?

Just how important was Magna Carta? | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it
This year people will mark the 800th anniversary of Magna Carta - a document which established one vital principle.
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What does it mean to have 'rights'? What are they? Who decides? How do we use them? Can we use them? Can we change them? Do they change?
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In Search Of A Science Of Consciousness

In Search Of A Science Of Consciousness | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it
Philosopher Alva Noë explores ideas in a new book that suggests consciousness and self is best looked at by combining insight from Western science, Indian philosophy and contemplative practices.
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For example "our attitudes about experience are usually governed by familiar concepts, and those familiar concepts don't really do justice to the great variety we actually experience. Take that red car parked out front. You see it. It's red. You experience its color. But there is so much more to be said about how it looks, even just confining our attention to color, than merely that it looks red. At one end it is glowing white in the direct glare of the sun. At the other end it is bathed in cool shadow and looks, really, almost gray. Gaining access to the structure and quality of experience requires, it would seem, a better taxonomy of qualities and modes of awareness of those qualities. It isn't obvious that ordinary language and thought provide us with this superior taxonomy"
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An Antidote to the Age of Anxiety: Alan Watts on Happiness and How to Live with Presence

An Antidote to the Age of Anxiety: Alan Watts on Happiness and How to Live with Presence | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it
Wisdom on overcoming the greatest human frustration from the pioneer of Eastern philosophy in the West. "How we spend our days is, of course, how we spend our lives,” Annie Dillard wrote in her timeless reflection on presence over productivity— a timely antidote to the central anxiety of our productivity-obsessed age. --by Maria Popova
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Why We Lost Leisure: David Steindl-Rast on Purposeful Work, Play, and How to Find Meaning in the Magnificent Superfluities of Life

Why We Lost Leisure: David Steindl-Rast on Purposeful Work, Play, and How to Find Meaning in the Magnificent Superfluities of Life | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it
“A piece of music doesn’t come to an end when its purpose is accomplished. It has no purpose, strictly speaking. It is the playful unfolding of meaning.” “Of all people only those are at leisure who make time for philosophy, only those are really alive,” Seneca wrote in his sublime meditation on the shortness of life, adding that when we reap these contemplative fruits of leisure, all the ages that have passed before ours are added to our own — “unless we are very ungrateful.” Two millennia later, in 1926, philosopher Bertrand Russell reflected on the urgent need to undo the Industrial Revolution’s legacy of equating an efficient life with a life worth living when he lamented: “What will be the good of the conquest of leisure and health, if no one remembers how to use them?” In the centuries since Seneca and decades since Russell, we have forgotten more and more how to imbue leisure with the kind of gratefulness that makes possible its true purpose of contemplation — instead, we treat leisure as a luxury, as another good to be gotten from the hamster wheel of material achievement.
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Why should we care about philosophy? | Angie Hobbs

Why should we care about philosophy? | Angie Hobbs | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it
This week we are talking to Angie Hobbs, the UK’s first Professor of the Public Understanding of Philosophy. The world seems divided into the relevant and the irrelevant. Doctors are relevant, given how much we treasure our health. Lawyers are relevant too, given how much we value our property. Even economists are relevant, given our strangely unquenchable desire to witness the past being predicted with deadly accuracy. But philosophers? Not so much, it seems. Angie believes, however, that philosophy anchors our human experience: “ it’s where we find the principles on which we build our knowledge, the tools to critical thinking and the keys to a more fulfilled life ”, she explains in this week's ReThink clip,
Via Robert Farrow
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Sorry, Plato and Descartes. Everything We Know We Know Through Our Bodies.

Sorry, Plato and Descartes. Everything We Know We Know Through Our Bodies. | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it
Have you ever deburred a dog? I have, and that distinctive experience (the dog in question was a black hound mix, and the burs were like brownish green stars in his fur) was responsible for some regrettable lines of poetry I wrote while in college: “When the alarm went off,...
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Plato's Symposium, In Our Time - BBC Radio 4

Plato's Symposium, In Our Time - BBC Radio 4 | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it
Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss Plato's Symposium.
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Includes Dr. Angie Hobbs who is Professor for the Public Understanding of Philosophy at the University of Sheffield

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Raising a Philosophical Child - YouTube

Raising a Philosophical Child Session of the American Philosophical Association Committee on Pre-College Instruction in Philosophy APA Pacific Meeting San Di...
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Raising a Philosophical Child

Session of the American Philosophical Association Committee on Pre-College Instruction in Philosophy
APA Pacific Meeting San Diego, CA 
April 16, 2014

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Is Philosophy Obsolete?

Is Philosophy Obsolete? | Butterflies in my head | Scoop.it
No. It helps make us coherent to ourselves, and that’s a never-ending project.
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The structure of universities demands that a field be designated as a science, a social science, or one of the humanities. This structure has ill served philosophy. It’s not a science, and it’s not a social science. Therefore it belongs, by default, to the humanities, rubbing shoulders with English literature and art history. And what are the humanities? They are premised, according to one cultural critic, Leon Wieseltier, who is among the most impassioned contemporary defenders of the humanities, on "the irreducible reality of inwardness" and are, in fact, "the study of the many expressions of that inwardness." (Wieseltier’s words were written in response to an essay by my husband, Steven Pinker.)

This definition of the humanities is arguably apposite for the study of art and literature, but most philosophers would reject it, starting with Plato himself. In fact, it sounds like a course-catalog description of the shadow studies in which the prisoners of Plato’s cave are involuntarily enrolled. The man who banished the poets from his utopia would hardly acquiesce in a view of philosophy that rendered it a species of literature. If the arguments of Plato and Descartes, Spinoza and Hume, Kant and Wittgenstein yield us nothing but expressions of our irreducible inwardness, then we can judge them only on aesthetic grounds, as we do Sophocles and Dante, Shakespeare and Milton, Virginia Woolf and James Joyce. Some philosophers might agree to the aestheticizing of the field (Martin Heidegger? Richard Rorty?), but many more would not. Henri Bergson argued that the relentless flow of time captures the essence of reality, and that, therefore, all concepts being static, distort reality. Proust channeled this conclusion into the literary techniques of In Search of Lost Time. But while we evaluate Bergson on the merits of his arguments, argumentative validity has no bearing on the accomplishment of Proust.

- See more at: http://m.chronicle.com/article/Is-Philosophy-Obsolete-/145837/#sthash.rLrYqIOb.dpuf

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