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Biotech Meds Are Swelling Those Pharma Pipelines - Forbes

Biotech Meds Are Swelling Those Pharma Pipelines - Forbes | Business of Life Science | Scoop.it
Biotech Meds Are Swelling Those Pharma Pipelines
Forbes
Over the past decade, the pharmaceutical industry has shifted emphasis from small molecule compounds to biotech products for a few good reasons.
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Biocon sets up CoE; says biotech sector aims $100 b revenue - Hindu Business Line

Biocon sets up CoE; says biotech sector aims $100 b revenue - Hindu Business Line | Business of Life Science | Scoop.it
Hindu Business Line Biocon sets up CoE; says biotech sector aims $100 b revenue Hindu Business Line Biotechnology major Biocon today announced the setting up of a centre of excellence (CoE) here for advanced learning in applied biosciences and said...
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Shire buys US firm ViroPharma to enhance rare diseases treatments - The Guardian

Shire buys US firm ViroPharma to enhance rare diseases treatments - The Guardian | Business of Life Science | Scoop.it
Wall Street Journal
Shire buys US firm ViroPharma to enhance rare diseases treatments
The Guardian
Shire bought US biotech company Transkaryotic Therapies in 2003, the start of a decade-long buying spree.
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Verastem Announces Pricing of Public Offering of Common Stock

Verastem Announces Pricing of Public Offering of Common Stock | Business of Life Science | Scoop.it
Verastem, Inc. , focused on discovering and developing drugs to treat cancer by the targeted killing of cancer stem cells, today announced the pricing of its previously announced underwritten public offering of 3,700,000 shares of its common stock,...
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SPIN - for the independent management consultant | Helping ...

SPIN - for the independent management consultant | Helping ... | Business of Life Science | Scoop.it

The beauty of using SPIN in selling management consulting is that it proves and improves your quality as a consultant. Management Consulting is 50% questions, 40% facilitation (which is also asking questions) and 10% ...


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Wildcat: Cyber Jouissance the future of cybernetically enhanced senses

Wildcat: Cyber Jouissance the future of cybernetically enhanced senses | Business of Life Science | Scoop.it

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Exclusive: Cancer - A cure just got closer thanks to a tiny British company - and the result could change lives of millions

Exclusive: Cancer - A cure just got closer thanks to a tiny British company - and the result could change lives of millions | Business of Life Science | Scoop.it
A single-storey workshop on a nondescript business park in Oxfordshire is not the sort of place where you would expect scientific revolutions to take place.

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Tiny Biotech With Three Cancer Drugs Is More Alluring Takeover Bet Now

Tiny Biotech With Three Cancer Drugs Is More Alluring Takeover Bet Now | Business of Life Science | Scoop.it
Because of the big decline in the shares of Spectrum Pharmaceuticals, the company has become even more vulnerable as a takeover candidate.
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How One Biotech Company, Alkermes, Survived a Brush With Death - Xconomy

How One Biotech Company, Alkermes, Survived a Brush With Death - Xconomy | Business of Life Science | Scoop.it
How One Biotech Company, Alkermes, Survived a Brush With Death
Xconomy
It's now a case study he occasionally puts in front of business students at MIT's Sloan School of Management.
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Novartis sells blood transfusion test unit to Grifols for $1.7 billion - Reuters

Novartis sells blood transfusion test unit to Grifols for $1.7 billion - Reuters | Business of Life Science | Scoop.it
Dividend.com Novartis sells blood transfusion test unit to Grifols for $1.7 billion Reuters Jimenez said on Monday he started the review of Novartis's businesses - including the blood unit which carries out tests to ensure blood transfusions do not...
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Biotech takeover interest more fad than fashion - The Economic Times

Biotech takeover interest more fad than fashion - The Economic Times | Business of Life Science | Scoop.it
Investors betting on a wave of big biotechnology deals following Amgen Inc's $10 billion bid for Onyx Pharmaceuticals Inc may well be disappointed.
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Babraham scientists make stem cell discovery | Business Weekly | Technology | Biotechnology | Business news | Cambridge and the East of England

Babraham scientists make stem cell discovery | Business Weekly | Technology | Biotechnology | Business news | Cambridge and the East of England | Business of Life Science | Scoop.it
Epigenetics researchers at the Babraham Institute in Cambridge UK have identified the biological process that leads to global loss of the genome’s methylation memory when cells are reprogrammed at fertilisation to the so-called ‘ground-state’...

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SPIN Selling and Major Account Sales Strategies by Neil Rackham - THE gold standard in selling skills.

SPIN Selling and Major Account Sales Strategies by Neil Rackham - THE gold standard in selling skills. | Business of Life Science | Scoop.it
From a seller's perspective it is important to get in step with your major accounts processes, rather than trying to manipulate them into yours.

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Peter Smith's curator insight, January 14, 2013 11:18 AM

Despite the tacky name of "SPIN",both of these books are the gold standard in sales training. They are based on behavioral psychology and works.These two along with Strategic Selling (Miller Heiman) are the only 3 books you need.

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Wearable Electronic Sensors Can Now Be Printed Directly on the Skin | MIT Technology Review

Wearable Electronic Sensors Can Now Be Printed Directly on the Skin | MIT Technology Review | Business of Life Science | Scoop.it
New electronic tattoos could help monitor health during normal daily activities.

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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, March 28, 2013 11:27 AM

(...) the devices consist of ultrathin electrodes, electronics, sensors, and wireless power and communication systems. In theory, they could attach to the skin and record and transmit electrophysiological measurements for medical purposes. These early versions of the technology, which were designed to be applied to a thin, soft elastomer backing, were “fine for an office environment,” says Rogers, “but if you wanted to go swimming or take a shower they weren’t able to hold up.” Now, Rogers and his coworkers have figured out how to print the electronics right on the skin, making the device more durable and rugged.

William J. Ryan's curator insight, March 29, 2013 10:32 AM

AMazing tech to help people monitor while maintaing quality of life!

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GE wants to use artificial intelligence to predict the future of health care innovations

GE wants to use artificial intelligence to predict the future of health care innovations | Business of Life Science | Scoop.it
GE Healthcare is pushing a system called Corvix for doing agent-based simulations on complex problems. In India, the technology simulated a population of 80 million people in order to determine the best places to build medical facilities.

 

Around the world, the health care system is rife with inefficiencies, and General Electric thinks it can help solve the problem using data. Only it’s not talking about bureaucrats looking at reports: GE has built an artificial intelligence system called Corvix that uses historical data to predict the future, including everything from how diseases will spread to the cities where hospitals will be needed the most.

 

It might sound futuristic, but the techniques behind Corvix have actually been around for a while. The platform uses agent-based modeling to build, essentially, a reasonable facsimile of some sort of complex system and then simulate its evolution over time. The “agents” represent the atomic units of those systems, such as individual people in the case of human populations or perhaps cells in the case of a biological simulation. They act according to a set of rules in any given situation, which is how the models are able to keep the simulations progressing.

 

However, thanks to the advent of big data, GE Healthcare Chief Economist Mitch Higashi thinks the time is right for a platform like Corvix to provide some real value to real-world decisions. There’s enough raw computing power, machine intelligence and data-modeling expertise to start doing fast, accurate simulations over very large and complicated datasets. Also, advances in user-interface design have made these types of models more consumable: GE’s Corvix uses a game-like UI “that any 10-year-old can figure out how to use in 10 minutes,” Higashi said.

 

The first live run for Corvix happened in the state of Andhra Pradesh in India, where the system simulated a population of 80 million people in order to figure out where to build hospitals and medical training centers over the coming years. The GE team used two census datasets and one health care survey in order to build what Higashi calls “a reasonable representation of 80 million people,” as well as a map of India’s existing hospital and energy grid. Health care analysts studying the problem of where to build can drag a new hospital over an area on the map and see how the situation plays out, Higashi explained.

 

The original plan, said Chaitanya Sarawate, GE’s head of health economics and reimbursement for India, was for the Public Health Foundation of India to invest $2 billion building training institutions in different cities over the next five years. Corvix suggested some possible changes in location of those institutions, including placing two institutions in the country’s most-populous state, Uttar Pradesh, instead of just one as was originally planned. The advice is part of a report from the foundation to India’s Minstry of Health, which will make the ultimate decision.

 

Developing countries such as India are great places to use this type of technology, Higashi explained, because they are doing greenfield investing in areas such as health infrastructure and a lot of good can happen if they get it right off the bat. The problem, Sarawate noted, is that they often lack detailed data that can help governments make objective comparisons — that’s the kind of stuff a company like GE, in this case, can track down and try to feed into a model that takes into account its relative importance.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Ray and Terry's
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Seattle Genetics Initiates Phase 1 Trial of SGN-CD33A in Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)

Seattle Genetics Initiates Phase 1 Trial of SGN-CD33A in Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) | Business of Life Science | Scoop.it
Seattle Genetics, Inc. today announced initiation of a phase 1 clinical trial of SGN-CD33A for patients with acute myeloid leukemia .
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