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Scooped by Martin (Marty) Smith
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Content Curation: 7 Reasons Why You Must via @HaikuDeck

Content Curation: 7 Reasons Why You Must via @HaikuDeck | BI Revolution | Scoop.it

We shocked a SEO Meetup suggesting 90% curation to 10% content creation. This deck explains why you MUST curate content. Content curation is a CSF (Crtical Success Factor) for online marketing.

7 Reasons You Must Curate Content
* Can't Create Sustainable Online Community Without Curating.
* Reach.
* Costs.
* Digitally Listening (is different).
* Authority.
* Tribes.
* Sustainable Online Community (so important its worth two listings).

Content curation is how you TEST and so protect your site's content creation. Content curation lowers your content creation costs and insures your current SEO ranks. Bet you agree, after flipping through this Hailku Deck (slides) content curation is a CSF (Critical Success Factor) for digital marketing.

Promise to follow with a deck on our favorite tools for content curation with @Scoop.itat the top of the list.

WOW, over 500 views in six hours thanks to Haiku Deck making Content Curation: 7 Reasons You Must a Featured Deck:
https://www.haikudeck.com/gallery/featured

Go directly to the deck
http://shar.es/1X0Rrc

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Rescooped by Martin (Marty) Smith from Content Creation, Curation, Management
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Even GREAT Content Creators Should Curate More

Even GREAT Content Creators Should Curate More | BI Revolution | Scoop.it

There is a creation myth that we often hear when it comes to content marketing. It tells us that in order to provide value with the content we produce, we need to create answers to questions. We need to create continually updated events, articles, videos, or images. Create, create, create. But creation is hard.


Via Stefano Principato, massimo facchinetti
Martin (Marty) Smith's insight:

Creation Is Hard
I love that line from this great Scoop by Massimo Facchinetti. This post is a great companion to my ScentTrail Social Mentions Study (just posted to Curation Revolution http://sco.lt/6UD0W9).

I shocked my friend @1918's SEO Meetup recently by suggesting the best ratio of content curation to creation is 90% curation to 10% creation. There was an audible gasp in the room.

I explained that curation has greater reach. For every minute of creation you get 3x as much out of using that same minute to curate. I create a lot of content, but, as my companion post proves, even I don't generate as much content as the daily mentions @ScentTrail receives.

 

Content gets shared. Here's the rub and the BIG reason my ratio is set to 90% curation - your are statically more likely to get shares with curated content. Since shares are a content marketing CSF (Critical Success Factor) and what we are playing for curation wins.

Why? I used to work for direct marketing catalogers (when I was a Director of Ecommerce). They taught me to always double down on winners and let losers go. Curation allows you to select content THAT IS ALREADY WINNING.

When I write something I'm betting it will be shared. When I see a great post by Brian Yanish (@MarketingHits), Robin Good (@RobinGood) or Michele Smorgon (@Maxoz) I know their extensive networks of supporters means high shares are likely. With a tool like Scoop.it I can also see the shares.

The irony is I hardly EVER look at existing shares to decide what content to share. I think in terms of WHO first. I have a group of about 50 friends I trust and I have a group of about 5 topics that are near and dear to me. When a friend shares something cool in one of my 5 interest areas I share it.

I agree with this post. Even if you can't CREATE you can CURATE. Even if you CAN create you SHOULD CURATE :). M

 

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Stefano Principato's curator insight, July 12, 2013 1:48 AM

Content Curation is a term that describes the act of finding, grouping, organizing, or sharing the best and most relevant content on a specific issue.