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How Intelligent Constraints Drive Creativity - Bloomberg

How Intelligent Constraints Drive Creativity - Bloomberg | Business change | Scoop.it
How Intelligent Constraints Drive Creativity Bloomberg Not long ago, Teresa Amabile revealed in an HBR blog post that while she had spent much of her career as a research psychologist showing how constraints can undermine creativity, she had...

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How to win in the age of analytics | McKinsey & Company

How to win in the age of analytics | McKinsey & Company | Business change | Scoop.it
Since the concept took hold, big data has made big waves. The field of analytics has developed rapidly since the McKinsey Global Institute (MGI) released its landmark 2011 report, Big data: The next frontier for innovation, competition, and productivity. But much value remains on the table as organizations wrestle with issues of strategy and implementation. In this episode of the McKinsey Podcast, MGI partner Michael Chui and McKinsey senior partner Nicolaus Henke speak with McKinsey Publishing’s Simon London about the changing landscape for data and analytics, opportunities in industries from retail to healthcare, and implications for workers.
David Hain's insight:

The main obstacles to exploiting big data effectively are organisational, not technical. Change needed!

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Protests and Force Don't Change People's Hearts and Minds

Protests and Force Don't Change People's Hearts and Minds | Business change | Scoop.it
Business Insider recently published an article titled One man has spent years befriending KKK members and persuaded 200 of them to leave the hate group. The article profiles Daryl Davis, an accomplished blues musician, with the unusual “hobby” of forging friendships with white supremacists. 

"'I never set out to convert anyone in the Klan,' he told The Independent. 'I just set out to get an answer to my question, 'How can you hate me when you don't even know me?' I simply gave them a chance to get to know me and treat them the way I want to be treated. They come to their own conclusion that this ideology is no longer for them'....

Davis' unusual quest is now the subject of a new documentary called 'Accidental Courtesy.'" In the trailer for the film, Davis says, "Give that person a platform.  Allow them to air their their views, and people will reciprocate."

As Davis describes it, "'I simply gave them a chance to get to know me and treat them the way I want to be treated.' They come to their own conclusion that this ideology is no longer for them."
David Hain's insight:

We need to understand the world form others perspective to bring about sustainable change! Interesting stories here..

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Competitive Advantage in the Digital Era

Competitive Advantage in the Digital Era | Business change | Scoop.it
The concept of "Competitive Advantage" is now used in everyday language. It is used to designate something that one does better than others, and it is used in many different ways, in many different fields. In a way, this is a good thing because it shows that management culture is spreading in our societies. The other side of the coin is that the concept has been emptied of its meaning to be easily used as soon as the opportunity is made. But then, what is competitive advantage? What are we exactly talking about when we say that a company has a competitive advantage? And more specifically, what is the competitive advantage in digital industries?
David Hain's insight:

Perpetual VUCA, digital disruption. Have you worked out your potential competitive advantage?

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Cynefin, knowledge and learning: what can you do to avoid disorder in 2017?

Cynefin, knowledge and learning: what can you do to avoid disorder in 2017? | Business change | Scoop.it

I’m a huge fan of Snowden & Boone’s (2007) Cynefin model. The seeds of Cynefin can be found at the heart of many of the knowledge and learning models and frameworks I’ve developed for organisations. The Cynefin design is both exquisite and elegant, a model in an age where management ideas are becoming a compendium of dead ideas (Economist, 2016).

For all its beauty and elegance, I believe that its application in organisations is hindered by a lack of understanding of its most powerful of domains, disorder. First, let me start with an overview.

When introducing Cynefin, I find that people become attracted to the four main domains (simple, complicated, complex and chaotic). These domains help to explain a given context, which guides management and leadership practice – note, the following is an applied adaptation of Cynefin, using applied adult learning theory and guidance from the IRGC (International Risk Governance Council):

David Hain's insight:

Musings on disorder - and ways to deal with it!

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Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, December 27, 2016 2:41 AM

Beside the situational leadership model (Hersey & Blanchard) this contextual leadership model is the one you can use practically in every moment of your working life. The earlier is about the experience level of the reporting staff while the latter is about the complexity of the issues/problems...

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We need to change the way we develop our change and project leaders

We need to change the way we develop our change and project leaders | Business change | Scoop.it
We need Project Leaders who can think for themselves and craft solutions for messy problems. We need Project Leaders who can adapt rapidly, learn quickly, keep agile and thrive in an ever changing workplace. We also need Senior Leadership Teams to recognise the value of project and change management, and that lack of awareness can lead to problems with strategy execution. We need Senior Leaders who know how to sponsor change correctly in today's world and understand that you transform your business through effective project and change leadership.

In the 1950s it took approximately two minutes to do a pit stop for a racing car. What is it now in F1? The car barely stops these days - around 2 seconds is average! In the 1950s the rules were different than they are now but F1 teams have adapted and changed the way they do it based on the new rules, learning and technology available.

David Hain's insight:

Progress at the sed of change requires new thinking and new skills!

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Is It Time For a Slow Innovation Movement?

Is It Time For a Slow Innovation Movement? | Business change | Scoop.it
I often speak of my own experience with FrontlineSMS, which took about three years to really get going, and – if I’d taken funding and committed to deadlines and deliverables early on – how it would likely have not made it that long. As a product, maybe it just needed three years to bed in, to take hold in the imagination of its users, for news to filter down. If that’s the case, then speeding up the process through an accelerator of some kind would have been counterproductive, and perhaps also have led to an early demise. Sometimes things just take time.

It begs the question: How many potentially great products have died prematurely because they weren’t given the time? Or because they were rushed? What proportion of projects do accelerators kill compared to those they genuinely accelerate?
David Hain's insight:

In praise of slow-cooking ideas...

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Drucker said: “innovate or else”

Drucker said: “innovate or else” | Business change | Scoop.it
Four great innovations show why ideas are key to business. Everything else is ancillary

Peter Drucker claimed that any business had only two primary functions: marketing and innovation. I would extend that contention to not-for-profit organizations too. Essentially, anyone who is selling anything is in the business of generating ideas, then promoting them. The rest is mere details.

Let’s be honest. Many, perhaps all, of our innovations come from flashes of sudden inspiration. I seem to get an enormous number of such flashes on awaking in the morning, which tells me that my mind has been hard at work all night while I slept. Entrepreneur Joe Cossman was an unbelievably productive innovator who thought of so many products that it was a miracle he found the time and resources to pursue even a small percentage of them. But somehow he exploited enough to become extremely wealthy. Similar to Drucker, he worked mainly alone as a one-man band. Most of his innovations probably made him a million dollars or more every time he introduced one. A few failed. Yet his innovations’ success rate and his productivity were both excellent. The Cossman Ant Farm was one of his most successful and best known efforts…
David Hain's insight:

Some stories of innovations that made it!

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The Rise of Emergent Organizations 

The Rise of Emergent Organizations  | Business change | Scoop.it
As we pass the tipping point toward a world fast enough and interconnected enough to be dominated by emergent systems, our methods of making decisions, and the tools available to help us make them, are changing.
Here are some rules of thumb and useful modes of understanding for managing ourselves and others in The Emergent Era.
David Hain's insight:

Emergent organisations get it - learners will change better, innovate more, inherit the earth!

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Legos Sustainable Turnaround Because of Systems Design

Legos Sustainable Turnaround Because of Systems Design | Business change | Scoop.it
Successful change projects, whether personal or corporate, must look at the whole system, find those things keeping them from the results they want, and then, with deep commitment, change what needs to be changed. This is hard work, only for the strong and courageous, definitely not the easy road to take. 
David Hain's insight:

Well drafted case study on whole-system turnaround from Charlee Hannah. Good short read with links!

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The Most Disruptive Transformation in History – Richard Florida – Medium

The Most Disruptive Transformation in History – Richard Florida – Medium | Business change | Scoop.it
We are undergoing several nested transformations at once that are causing incredible disruptions of the economic, social, and political order.
The first is the shift from an economy that is powered by natural resources and physical labor to one in which knowledge and the mind have become the dominant means of production. This shift has advantaged roughly a third of the population and workforce, while the other 66 percent have fallen further behind.
The second shift is toward urban clustering as the source of innovation and economic advantage. This massively concentrates talent and economic assets in a handful of superstar cities and knowledge-tech hubs.
The world has become spikier and spikier, across nations, across regions, and within cities. The clustering of talent and economic assets also makes the city the new economic and social organizing unit, undermining two core institutions of the old order: the large vertical corporation and the nation-state.
I would suggest that this transformation — the clustering of knowledge over physical labor — is among the most disruptive in recorded history.
So it should not be surprising that so massive an upheaval would generate an equally powerful backlash.
David Hain's insight:

This is true for the UK too. CityDeals will pave the way to a new, more decentralised economic policy - but what do we do about the non-urban areas?

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Global engines “stuttering", warns Drucker chief

Global engines “stuttering", warns Drucker chief | Business change | Scoop.it
The world’s engines of progress are stuttering – but the world is still a much better place than in earlier times in history.

That is the view of Dr Richard Straub, president of the Peter Drucker Society Europe, of which Dialogue is media partner.

Straub used his opening address at the 8th Global Peter Drucker Forum, taking place this week in Vienna, to fire a warning to leaders and managers that growing inequalities, debt crises, climate change, aging populations and global conflicts are checking the incredible progress of humankind.

“The engines of progress are stuttering,” Straub said at the Forum, themed this year The Entrepreneurial Society. “We cannot rest on our laurels. We are increasingly fearful about technology: that it will destroy the fabric of society, making humans redundant and making machines take over.”

But in his opening letter to the Forum, Straub reminded delegates that in fact the history of technological innovation showed that it had been a key catalyst for improving the human condition. “The positive change we have experienced in just the past 250 years is astounding,” he wrote. “This unprecedented surge in income and improvement in living conditions for the masses… for sure comes down to human ingenuity, dramatically unleashed in key areas by technological breakthroughs and advances in governance.”

In a call to arms, Straub said in his address: “We have in our hands creative potential that is totally unprecedented in history. The challenge as managers is how can we manage this huge potential? I believe we have not even scratched the surface.”
David Hain's insight:

Big challenges ahead - change engines are changing!

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Getting Reorgs Right

Why Reorgs Fail
A McKinsey survey of 1,800 executives identified the most common pitfalls for reorganizations (in order of frequency).

1. Employees actively resist the changes.

2. Insufficient resources—people, time, money—are devoted to the effort.

3. Employees are distracted from their day-to-day activities, and individual productivity declines.

4. Leaders actively resist the changes.

5. The org chart changes, but the way people work stays the same.

6. Employees leave because of the reorg.

7. Unplanned activities, such as an unforeseen need to change IT systems or to communicate the changes in multiple languages, disrupt implementation.

David Hain's insight:

Get reorganisation right and more good things happen than bad. A view on how to achieve that here.

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Crisp's Blog » Poster on Agile in a Nutshell – with a spice of Lean UX

Crisp's Blog » Poster on Agile in a Nutshell – with a spice of Lean UX | Business change | Scoop.it
This is a poster I made for a Agile intro class on Hyper Island Digital Business class 2017 where I and my colleague Per Lundholm was last week. The class was as big as 40 people, and covering from a couple of experts to mostly total novelty, which is usually the most difficult type of situation for a teacher or coach. But it went well, maybe not all thanks to the poster but it sure made it a lot easier for both me and Per as teachers, as well as the students who could follow more easily as well as take notes.
David Hain's insight:

Agile 101 in a handy poster - useful document!

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93% of Successful Companies Abandon Their Original Strategy

93% of Successful Companies Abandon Their Original Strategy | Business change | Scoop.it
93% of all companies that ultimately become successful had to abandon their original strategy because it was not viable. Amar Bhide. (In, “How Will You Measure Your Life,” by Clayton Christensen.)
David Hain's insight:

Emergence - therefore the ability to learn - is critical in gaining competitive advantage. If you don't, someone else will...!

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Dove Nobel's comment, January 11, 10:12 AM
http://www.americanlisted.com/post_ad.html?category_id=34
Ian Berry's curator insight, January 11, 6:22 PM
I like the idea of emergent strategy however I think the key is not confusing strategy with your execution plan and the tactics therein. My successful strategy hasn't changed in 26 years. What has changed dramatically and continues to do do is the execution plan and the tactics
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The End of Conventional Industry Sectors

The End of Conventional Industry Sectors | Business change | Scoop.it
These days, few people expect to work for a single company throughout their career. But what about the expectation that companies will remain in one industry forever? Is that, too, becoming an artifact of the past?

In a new PwC report called “The Future of Industries: Bringing Down the Walls,” we look at how the boundaries among sectors are shifting. The pace of technological change is creating at least the prospect of a new industrial order, in which most companies no longer operate within the comfort zones of their established sectors. Already, a few companies (Apple, Amazon, and GE, among them) have boldly and successfully moved into new industries. Now just about every other company will have to do business that way.
David Hain's insight:

Disruption is all around. Are you thinking about it? Threat or opportunity? Either way, it's probably coming...

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Tips for Change Facilitation – Changing Dojo 

Tips for Change Facilitation – Changing Dojo  | Business change | Scoop.it
Changeability is one of the most important characteristics for companies in the 21st century. As Peter Senge pointed out "Organisational change combines inner shifts in people’s values, aspirations, and behaviours with outer shifts in processes, strategies, practices, and systems”.
However, most of the time, the people do not know how to foster this ability inside the corporation. They need help. They need some facilitation to overcome the obstacles during the change journey.
A Change Facilitator is someone who helps the organisation to identify the opportunities to improve and foster collective strategies to maximise the success of the change efforts.
After several years facilitating organisations in small and large change initiatives, I have collected a set of brief lessons to help Change Facilitators in order to maximise the chances of success in a change/transformation initiative.
David Hain's insight:

Insightful tips to tune up or kickstart your changeability quotient in 2017.

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Ian Berry's curator insight, December 28, 2016 4:58 PM
I like them all MVI and Cultural Mixer in particular
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We think about business competition all wrong!

We think about business competition all wrong! | Business change | Scoop.it
Business competition is a huge deal. To some guys who come to run companies (women too), beating others and making more revenue is the closest thing they have to fun. In the course of all this, we’ve essentially created two problems:

“Winner take all,” or the idea that you gotta beat all your rivals. It’s all about revenue plays! Market share!
“Must have an enemy,” or the idea that some rival is coming to steal your market share and pillage your wife
That second idea — about corporate values and enemies — basically handed us Donald Trump. A lot of people felt alienated and scared by new economic realities, from immigration to automation. He tapped into that fear and beat a much-more qualified candidate. Obviously many other things played into all this — including the good ol’ “high achiever myth” — but defining an enemy helped a lot. This has been a political staple for decades.

It’s been a business staple for decades too. Business competition really gets some dudes fired up, perhaps more than porn or some other lewd thing. “I’m gonna steal market share from those jerks,” an executive purrs, “and dominate this business competition.” 

What if we’re thinking about it all wrong, though?
David Hain's insight:

Competition or collaboration? We tend to default to the former, but there are many arguments for the latter!

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The Most Disruptive Transformation in History ?

The Most Disruptive Transformation in History ? | Business change | Scoop.it
We are undergoing several nested transformations at once that are causing incredible disruptions of the economic, social, and political order.
The first is the shift from an economy that is powered by natural resources and physical labor to one in which knowledge and the mind have become the dominant means of production. This shift has advantaged roughly a third of the population and workforce, while the other 66 percent have fallen further behind.
The second shift is toward urban clustering as the source of innovation and economic advantage. This massively concentrates talent and economic assets in a handful of superstar cities and knowledge-tech hubs.
The world has become spikier and spikier, across nations, across regions, and within cities. The clustering of talent and economic assets also makes the city the new economic and social organizing unit, undermining two core institutions of the old order: the large vertical corporation and the nation-state.
David Hain's insight:

The big transformation - labour to knowledge - is already disrupting the world as we know it. What next?

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How to Prioritize Your Company’s Projects

Every organization needs what I call a “hierarchy of purpose.” Without one, it is almost impossible to prioritize effectively.

Prioritization at a strategic and operational level is often the difference between success and failure. But many organizations do it badly.

David Hain's insight:

Simple, useful structure that could stop you from blurring strategic goals and doing too many projects not well enough!

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Ensure Employee Commitment to Change Initiatives: Creating Relevance and Meaning

Ensure Employee Commitment to Change Initiatives: Creating Relevance and Meaning | Business change | Scoop.it
Most organizations have many change initiatives occurring at once, in all parts of the organization, large and small – all making demands on people. Employees know they are being asked or pressured to change, but they often do not know why in terms that are meaningful to them. This makes it difficult for them to have a personal commitment to change. Leaders often interpret lack of employee commitment as resistance, but it is more likely stakeholders not understanding why the changes are essential to the success of the business, and importance of their role in it. 

The pushback is usually not an employee issue, but a change leadership issue. Most people commit to what they believe in. And to believe in anything, people must see its relevance and meaning. Without perceiving relevance and meaning, there is no employee commitment. People must see themselves as contributing in ways they can relate to in support of the future of the business. Just because leaders say something is going to change doesn’t mean that stakeholders will understand it, do it, or sustain it. We know this all too well! 

David Hain's insight:

Most employees who resist change are being rational in their context. Change their context!

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The Neuroscience of Strategic Leadership

The Neuroscience of Strategic Leadership | Business change | Scoop.it
Have you ever had a difficult executive decision to make? This is the kind of decision where the best options aren’t obvious, the ethics aren’t clear, and the consequences could affect hundreds of people or more. How do you figure out the right thing to do? More importantly, how do you develop the habit of making better decisions, time and time again, even in difficult and uncertain circumstances?

Neuroscientists and psychologists are beginning to learn what happens at moments of choice inside the human mind (the locus of mental activity) and the brain (the physical organ associated with that activity). If you understand these dynamics and how they affect you and those around you, you can set a course toward more effective patterns of thinking and action. You can replicate those beneficial patterns, at a larger scale, in your organization. Over time, this practice can help you take on a quality of strategic leadership: inspiring others, helping organizations transcend their limits, and navigating enterprises toward lofty, beneficial goals.
David Hain's insight:

Where's your focus of attention when making strategic decisions? Neuroscience can help!

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Blockchain Is A Disruption and An Opportunity - Daniel Burrus

Blockchain Is A Disruption and An Opportunity - Daniel Burrus | Business change | Scoop.it
When Bitcoins were first introduced in 2009, they were the first cyber currency. I labeled them a Soft Trend—one whose future was looking good but not certain. At the same time, I identified cyber currency as a growing Hard Trend that would continue; accordingly, I suggested there would be many more cyber currencies in the near future. Both have held true, as the future success of Bitcoins, although promising, is not a future fact, and there are more than 100 cyber currencies to date.

As it happens, the enabling technology with which Bitcoin transactions are handled has gained far more traction. The rapidly evolving technology of blockchains represents a Hard Trend that will continue to grow. It holds enormous promise for game changing disruption across any number of industries and fields.
David Hain's insight:

"Check it on the blockchain" will be the "Google that of 21C!" ~ Daniel Burrus

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Five Ways To Make Strategic Plans Succeed

Five Ways To Make Strategic Plans Succeed | Business change | Scoop.it
Each year, business leaders complain about how strategic planning is ineffective or useless. A growing number of articles point to this problem. Strategists have become the whipping boys of the corporate executive suite. Despite the hours strategy teams spend on rigorous analysis, scenario modeling, market research and countless plan drafts which point out specific problem areas or new growth opportunities, when it comes time to state the strategy, business leaders cop out. They end up softening the edges. They resist being specific. They compromise because they don’t want to offend anyone or leave any group out.  They don’t want to risk placing a bet and being wrong, so they bet on everything.

The result is a lowest common denominator strategic plan which sounds pleasing to everyone, but serves no one. Companies need to break the cycle. Here are five practical and actionable things business leaders can do right now to make their next strategic plan better.
David Hain's insight:

Lot of sense here about prioritising, stopping less important work, ensuring alignment against scope creep. It's less the planning than the execution that is the issue!

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Ian Berry's curator insight, December 8, 2016 1:47 AM
There's some good common sense here however the wise gather the information, determine insights then describe their strategy in a sentence. The hard work is then ensuring every employee has their unique piece of the execution map. Strategic planning is actually a oxymoron
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Four common mistakes in identifying behaviours

Four common mistakes in identifying behaviours | Business change | Scoop.it
The ultimate goal of any change initiative is to get people to do something different. To change what they are actually doing. To change their behaviours. Therefore the first step to any successful change is to decide what the behaviour is you want people to now do.


Why is focussing on behaviours so important? Research by the authors of Influencer shows that those who have been consistently successful in delivering change, in very difficult and complex environments, have one distinguishing feature – they  focus on behaviours.

They’re inflexible on this point. They don’t do anything  until they’ve carefully identified the specific behaviours they want to change. They start by asking; “In order to improve our existing situation, what must people actually do?”

So, a behaviour is something you can walk into a room and see someone doing. They’re observable actions. If you can’t walk into a room and see someone doing it – it’s not a behaviour. If you can’t go and do it – it’s not a behaviour.  If you can’t teach it to someone, and observe them doing it – it’s not a behaviour.

From my experience there are four common mistakes people make when trying to identify the behaviours they want to change.
David Hain's insight:

Behaviours - observable, specific, measurable - don't ignore them in change efforts in favour of generalised exhortations!

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Risk: Seeing around the corners | McKinsey & Company

Risk: Seeing around the corners | McKinsey & Company | Business change | Scoop.it
What can companies do to prepare themselves? True, there’s no easy formula for anticipating the way risk cascades through a company or an economy. But we’ve found that executives who systematically examine the way risks propagate across the whole value chain—including competitors, suppliers, distribution channels, and customers—can foresee and prepare for second-order effects more successfully.
David Hain's insight:

McKinsey on risk - old but gold!

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