Business change
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'If you want to effect strategic change, you must touch people in their everyday lives', says leading HR academic

'If you want to effect strategic change, you must touch people in their everyday lives', says leading HR academic | Business change | Scoop.it
HR Magazine Veronica Hope-Hailey, professor of strategy and HRM, and head of Strategic and International Management group, University of Bath, says that to have effective communication with your...

Via Fernanda Grimaldi
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People change with their hearts - much more than their heads!

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5 Dimensions of Integrating Change & Project Management | Prosci

5 Dimensions of Integrating Change & Project Management | Prosci | Business change | Scoop.it
The disciplines of change management and project management understandably cross paths throughout the execution of a project or initiative. Each brings necessary and critical structure for effectively implementing change and realizing results. Below are four tactical dimensions along which integration can occur. A fifth dimension is also mentioned regarding a common objective and how integration around results and outcomes drives more effective integration in action.
David Hain's insight:

Insightful and practical advice on managing change programmes form one of the best change consultancies I know of.

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4 Things You Can Do to Make Better Decisions Now — Chief Learning Officer - CLO Media

4 Things You Can Do to Make Better Decisions Now — Chief Learning Officer - CLO Media | Business change | Scoop.it
There is a system that can help us solve complex problems, and there is a way to do it that boosts our confidence in our decision-making capabilities and enables us to have conviction that our solution has a good likelihood of succeeding.

I created one: the AREA Method decision-making system. I initially developed it to help me do better at my work as an investigative journalist. I was searching for a way to better control and counteract my mental biases, those assumptions and judgments that help us every day when making small decisions but that don’t go away when we need to solve complex problems. I also wanted to better understand the incentives and motives in the other people I was dealing with.
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AREA - complex decision making framed in a simpler process...

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Everybody has a plan until they get punched in the face…

Everybody has a plan until they get punched in the face… | Business change | Scoop.it
Don’t get caught in the “perfect strategic plan” myth. Even the most accurate and well-conceived one will need some changes.

David Hain's insight:

Are you applying the tactic of strategic experimentation? Maybe you should! Useful summary here.

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donhornsby's curator insight, May 5, 9:17 AM
Don’t get caught in the “perfect strategic plan” myth. Even the most accurate and well-conceived one will need some changes.
 
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Top 20 Tips to be the Best Project Leader 

Top 20 Tips to be the Best Project Leader  | Business change | Scoop.it
Susanne Madsen is a project leader coach, trainer and consultant in London. She is the author of the books: The Project Management Coaching Workbook and The Power of Project Leadership. Based on her experience during the years with her own business, in addition to 17 years in the corporate sector, Susanne gives you her top 20 tips for you to be the best project leader ever.
David Hain's insight:

It's not rocket science - it never is - but theses are really good change manager tips!

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Begoña Pabón's curator insight, May 3, 2:15 PM
Dirigir y liderar un proyecto con eficacia no siempre es tarea facil. Descubre los 20 Tips mas provechosos para conseguirlo.
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Agile HR model for Agile Organizations – an emerging post Ulrich world

Agile HR model for Agile Organizations – an emerging post Ulrich world | Business change | Scoop.it
This blog argues that organizational agility should be translated directly to a new, agile HR operating model, and predicts the emergence of three roles: Embedded Coaches, Knowledge Asset & Network Managers and Data Center professionals. The key point in the new model are not the roles themselves, but the way they are wired, to interact with each other and their stakeholders to deliver business value in terms of cost savings, efficiency gains and better (knowledge) asset management and increased growth capability via superior employee experience.
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The future for HR?

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Expert Project Management - Max's Papers - Index

Expert Project Management - Max's Papers - Index | Business change | Scoop.it
After the last two papers, it is appropriate that Paul Barshop should come along with "What every executive needs to know to avoid costly mistakes and make major investments pay off", the sub-title of his book. Paul writes a clear description of the project management Stage-Gate process, and why it is so important for executives to understand it and implement it.
David Hain's insight:

Attention project managers - excellent database of case studies to mine, here!

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The global forces inspiring a new narrative of progress | McKinsey

We hear about the challenges every day in our conversations with global business leaders: How long can their traditional sources of competitive advantage survive in the face of technological shifts? How will changing consumer and societal expectations affect their business models? What does it mean to be a global company when the benefits of international integration are under intense scrutiny?

All good questions. But they should not distract from the extraordinary opportunities available to leaders who understand the changes under way and who convert them into positive momentum for their businesses. Our hope in this article is to help leaders spot those opportunities by clarifying nine major global forces and their interactions. Significant tension runs through each of them, so much that we’d characterize them as “crucibles,” or spaces in which concentrated forces interact and where the direction of the reactions under way is unclear. These crucibles, therefore, are spaces to watch, in which innovation “temperature” is high.
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An attempt to make sense of the confusing trends that unsettle the organisational environment.

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Incubators and accelerators: An updated directory for the UK | Nesta

Incubators and accelerators: An updated directory for the UK | Nesta | Business change | Scoop.it
Nesta has a long-standing interest in understanding startup support, including methods of incubation and acceleration. 

Today, we publish a new study, commissioned by the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and produced by Nesta with support from the UK Science Parks Association (UKSPA) and Synoptica, an artificial intelligence data provider, which maps the landscape of incubators and accelerators in the UK, identifying where they are located and what sectors they cover. 

At the same time, we are also publishing a new directory of incubators and accelerators in the UK. This directory is, we believe, the most comprehensive of its kind for the UK and we hope that it will be a useful tool for both entrepreneurs searching for programmes and facilities to which they can apply, as well as to researchers.
David Hain's insight:

Where you can go in the UK for start up or growth support!

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Strategy Is Not About The Competition 

Strategy Is Not About The Competition  | Business change | Scoop.it
As an inherently competitive species, we are greatly tempted to think of business as war or sport where one’s gains can only come at the expense of our rivals—where winning means the other guy is losing. (Or as Genghis Khan is often quoted: “It is not enough that I succeed. Everyone else must fail.”) Indeed, there are strong motivational benefits to rallying around “beat Coke” if you are Pepsi, “buy Detroit” if you are Chrysler, or a “holy war with Google” if you are Apple. But such “strategies” will only be successful if they spur their organizations to bring better products and total value propositions to their target customers.
Business is not war or sport. Strategy in business is different than strategy in war and sport. It’s not about competitors. It’s about the customer, your value proposition, and the capabilities you need to deliver it better than anyone else. It’s that simple—and that difficult.
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Some useful thoughts on strategy formulation!

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The ‘how’ of transformation | McKinsey 

Our experience suggests that, regardless of the circumstances, real transformation happens only when a leadership team embraces the idea of holistic change in how the business operates—tackling all the factors that create value for an organization, including top line, bottom line, capital expenditures, and working capital. This is easier said than done. Ordinary approaches to transformation typically deliver ordinary (and often suboptimal) results.

To achieve extraordinary results, we believe a comprehensive, highly disciplined methodology—encompassing both the “what” and the “how”—is needed (exhibit). The “what” entails the smooth movement of the many specific transformation ideas and initiatives through three phases: from independent diligence to planning to implementation. These phases will sound familiar to the seasoned executive.
David Hain's insight:

Setting transformation goals is easy. Managing the process to get there is really hard! Think holistic to improve...

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Outline for strategic planning

Outline for strategic planning | Business change | Scoop.it
Strategic planning can provide the geometry for organizational alignment, the blueprint for sustained brilliance. It has never been more important to provide alignment for maximum focus and effectiveness. In a polarized world we need the discerning wisdom possible in strategic plans that promote human connection while encouraging diversity and human brilliance.

Here, I am updating the glossary of strategic terminology I published six years ago, to provide a clearer outline — addressing contemporary challenges to organizational effectiveness. This outline reflects the order in which I facilitate the strategic planning process, with the goals of insightful guidance to every employee and sustainable brilliance throughout the organization.
David Hain's insight:

A strategy consultant on the order of things...

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Paul Niven Makes You Care about Strategy Again

Paul Niven Makes You Care about Strategy Again | Business change | Scoop.it
Today I’m talking with Paul Niven, who is taking a stand against the frustratingly low levels of strategy execution in organizations here in North America and around the world. Paul is the co-author of Objectives and Key Results: Driving Focus, Alignment, and Engagement with OKRs.

As you might expect, Paul is a leading researcher and authority on OKRs. In this interview we discuss:

Why strategy execution is a number one concern for executives.
The factors that contribute to an organizations inability to deliver on strategy.
Mission and vision, and the difference between them.
How to prevent tediously bland statements of non-achievable, random aspirations.
Identifying broad priorities.
And much, much more . . .
David Hain's insight:

Insightful interview on strategy.

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The global forces inspiring a new narrative of progress | McKinsey & Company

The global forces inspiring a new narrative of progress | McKinsey & Company | Business change | Scoop.it
Corporate leaders today need to rethink where and how they compete, and also must cooperate in the crafting of a new societal deal that helps individuals cope with disruptive technological change.

That broad narrative of intensifying competition, as well as the growing need for cooperation, contains challenges, but also great opportunity. We hear about the challenges every day in our conversations with global business leaders: How long can their traditional sources of competitive advantage survive in the face of technological shifts? How will changing consumer and societal expectations affect their business models? What does it mean to be a global company when the benefits of international integration are under intense scrutiny?

All good questions. But they should not distract from the extraordinary opportunities available to leaders who understand the changes under way and who convert them into positive momentum for their businesses. Our hope in this article is to help leaders spot those opportunities by clarifying nine major global forces and their interactions. Significant tension runs through each of them, so much that we’d characterize them as “crucibles,” or spaces in which concentrated forces interact and where the direction of the reactions under way is unclear. These crucibles, therefore, are spaces to watch, in which innovation “temperature” is high.
David Hain's insight:

Some opportunities for shift in the midst of digital and societal disruption!

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How Did We GET Here? The Mystery of Organisational Culture Transmission

How Did We GET Here? The Mystery of Organisational Culture Transmission | Business change | Scoop.it
So how DOES organisational culture get passed on (or transmitted)?

It is an important question that does not get the attention it deserves. The corporate world is familiar with measures of organisational culture and engagement. Most of Australia’s largest companies have at some point pulled in an external research company to give them a picture of their current organisational culture. Some do it religiously every year to track changes.

These measures are helpful and paint a rich story of the cultural norms that exist. What happens after the report has come out is the sticky bit. Many a large company has received “this years culture score” and the response is somewhat predictable. There are rounds of workshops, pie charts and circumflexes are pawed over, some people get bonuses other lose them and then HR are left holding the baby of “improve the culture”.

Some companies make great use of the data and use it to transform – but others end up thinking “I KNOW this…but what do I DO about it?”. The real question they are asking is: How did we get here and how is the culture continuously transmitted onwards?

Thankfully the fields of sociology, anthropology and psychology have been asking this question for decades. If you start looking harder you find that the famous philosopher – and one of the earliest psychologists – William James was asking this question in the 1850s. Even Charles Darwin himself strayed from naturalism into culture and pondered the way in which his principles of natural selection apply to cultural norms.

David Hain's insight:

Transformation needs culture, mindset change. Very useful science based article on how to engineer it.

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Regulating the internet giants: The world’s most valuable resource is no longer oil, but data | The Economist

Regulating the internet giants: The world’s most valuable resource is no longer oil, but data | The Economist | Business change | Scoop.it
A NEW commodity spawns a lucrative, fast-growing industry, prompting antitrust regulators to step in to restrain those who control its flow. A century ago, the resource in question was oil. Now similar concerns are being raised by the giants that deal in data, the oil of the digital era. These titans—Alphabet (Google’s parent company), Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Microsoft—look unstoppable. They are the five most valuable listed firms in the world. Their profits are surging: they collectively racked up over $25bn in net profit in the first quarter of 2017. Amazon captures half of all dollars spent online in America. Google and Facebook accounted for almost all the revenue growth in digital advertising in America last year.

David Hain's insight:

How do we control the Goliaths that control the world's data?

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The NHS: A Visual Essay from juniordoctorblog.com

The NHS: A Visual Essay from juniordoctorblog.com | Business change | Scoop.it
#voteNHS #GE2017 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wSmPIBJWXGM Please share widely and vote wisely. juniordoctorblog.com
David Hain's insight:

Perhaps the biggest transformation challenge affecting the UK today - and the facts say we are ignoring it! Great animation on the NHS crisis!

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Seven principles for change management 

Seven principles for change management  | Business change | Scoop.it
Every organization—and every change management initiative—is unique. But these seven principles apply across the board, and they can improve an institution’s odds of realizing the envisioned benefits.

Download Seven principles for effective change management: Sustaining stakeholder commitment in higher education, to read the full article in PDF format.
David Hain's insight:

These principles are pretty universal when it comes to organisation change

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Individual/Organizational Change Integration | Prosci

Individual/Organizational Change Integration | Prosci | Business change | Scoop.it
Effective change management requires two components: an individual change management model that describes how a single person makes a change and an organizational change management process that describes the process and tools practitioners use.

The individual change management model provides the outcome-orientation to change management. The Prosci ADKAR Model describes what you are trying to achieve when you work to manage the people side of a project or initiative.

The organizational change management process provides the activity-orientation and lays out the actions a practitioner must complete for a project or initiative. The Prosci 3-Phase Process describes what you will do to encourage those individual transitions required by your project.

Managing change without both perspectives is ineffective. Without an individual change management model, you cannot focus on the project outcomes. Instead, you become focused on your work (such as sending a newsletter) instead of what you are trying to achieve (such as sharing why the change is necessary).

But without an organizational change management process, changes become unmanageable when they impact dozens or hundreds or thousands of employees. The organizational change management framework guides actual work in a manageable and repeatable way.
David Hain's insight:

Prosci are pretty good on change matters - read about their methods here!

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Distortions and deceptions in strategic decisions | McKinsey

Strategic decisions are never simple to make, and they sometimes go wrong because of human shortcomings. Behavioral economics teaches us that a host of universal human biases, such as overoptimism about the likelihood of success, can affect strategic decisions. Such decisions are also vulnerable to what economists call the "principal-agent problem": when the incentives of certain employees are misaligned with the interests of their companies, they tend to look out for themselves in deceptive ways.

Most companies know about these pitfalls. Yet few realize that principal-agent problems often compound cognitive imperfections to form intertwined and harmful patterns of distortion and deception throughout the organization. Two distinct approaches can help companies come to grips with these patterns. First, managers can become more aware of how biases can affect their own decision making and then endeavor to counter those biases. Second, companies can better avoid distortions and deceptions by reviewing the way they make decisions and embedding safeguards into their formal decision-making processes and corporate culture.
David Hain's insight:

Self-awareness and willingness to look at team process as well as cognitive analysis are critical strategic advantages when taking big decisions!

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We're moving fast. But nobody knows where we're going

We're moving fast. But nobody knows where we're going | Business change | Scoop.it
Adapting to an uncertain future

The sooner we realize that long-term forecasting is becoming obsolete, the better we’ll be able to cope with the new reality. Businesses are already responding by hiring Chief Digital Officers, promoting entrepreneurial culture, and elevating the innovation imperative to the level of existential priority. Perhaps another implication will be the end of business strategy as we know it. Strategic foresight and scenarios planning seem to offer better methodologies for business to adapt and adopt to the ever-changing competitive environment.

The wild speculation about the accelerating technological process is hardly a novel trend. The news of self-driven carriages must have terrified horse owners; and those pundits who witnessed automation of factory jobs predicted sustained mass-scale unemployment. Every time we attempt to predict the future with the contextual awareness of today, we struggle with the failure of imagination or, perhaps, we discount the notion that unknown unknowns are unknowable by definition.
David Hain's insight:

What is the impact of speed of change on organisation strategy? Scenario choices better suited than impossible-to-predict plans.

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Transformer

Transformer | Business change | Scoop.it

The low-entry, high-growth model is classic disruption theory à la Clayton Christensen, author of The Innovator’s Dilemma. But the pattern Christensen describes isn’t the only type of innovative strategy that can transform industries such that incumbents can no longer do business as usual. Uber has transformed the taxi industry; Tesla is transforming the automotive industry; Amazon the retailing industry; Build-a-Bear the stuffed toy market; and Cirque de Soleil the entertainment industry. They are all using innovative strategies that differ from Christensen’s classic disruption theory. Yet what is similar is that they are forcing incumbents to change business-as-usual. This happens when innovators offer value that is attractive to incumbents’ customers, and is delivered through a business model that is difficult for incumbents to imitate. Here are five innovative strategies that upstarts, or
incumbents, may use that can
radically transform industries.

David Hain's insight:

There are many ways to be disruptive in your chosen sector - some examples here!

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Agility Levels the Playing Field. Anticipation Changes the Game. 

Agility Levels the Playing Field. Anticipation Changes the Game.  | Business change | Scoop.it
The global marketplace is hardly a novel concept. But what is constantly new is the shifting challenge of knowing where you and your organization best fit into that setting—a form of ongoing flux that’s only going to accelerate in the future.

That’s why an anticipatory mindset is critical to succeeding in an economy largely defined only by the geographic limits of the planet. As is the case with so many traditional ideas and principles, the strategies that worked yesterday may only be holding you back today and tomorrow.
David Hain's insight:

Foresight is critical in driving cars. It's also critical in driving change!

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If Scale Isn’t The Goal, Then What Is? – Strong Words – Medium

If Scale Isn’t The Goal, Then What Is? – Strong Words – Medium | Business change | Scoop.it
From restaurants to direct mail, there’s pressure to be scalable, to be efficient, to create something easily replicated.
Which is often used as the reason it’s not very good. “Well, we’d like to spend more time/more care/more focus on this, but we need to get bigger.”
What if you started in the other direction?
What would happen if you created something noteworthy and worried about scale only after you’ve figured out how to make a difference?
David Hain's insight:

Growth isn't the only reason for change - and maybe it's not a great measure?

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Design Thinking is Never Enough

Design Thinking is Never Enough | Business change | Scoop.it
Design thinking has become such a hot topic amongst L&D and innovation teams at large companies that one would think executives see it as their silver bullet solution to their innovation woes (that, or it’s a way for them to be seen to be investing in innovation and providing a creative outlet for their millennial staffers).

Whatever the case, over 80% of new product launches at large companies fail and it’s because, as Michael Dell famously put it, “ideas are a commodity, execution of them is not”.

The same holds true in the startup world where 95% of startups fail, usually due to market failure stemming from botched execution.

While design thinking is indeed an incredibly powerful ideation and prototyping tool that I use with my team and with clients, it is but one of many pieces to the corporate innovation puzzle.

It alone won’t deliver any value beyond temporarily galvanizing employees and delivering some chemical reactions.
David Hain's insight:

Design thinking is great, but without mindset behavioural change it is pretty empty!

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Us versus Them: Reframing Resistance to Change

Us versus Them: Reframing Resistance to Change | Business change | Scoop.it

In the worst-case scenario, “us versus them” thinking devolves into factions that compete but never really engage. According to Robert Fritz, author of The Path of Least Resistance for Managers (Newfane Press, 2011), the result is an oscillation between changes, rather than real advancement. “Companies swing back and forth, from centralization to decentralization, acquisition to divestiture, customer focus to shareholder focus,” he explains. “It’s like a rocking chair: lots of movement, with very little progress.”

The solution is to reframe how we think about resistance. Rather than assuming critical thinkers are resistors, we would do better to treat them as guardians. Guardians see what needs to be protected, and the trust that can be destroyed by a broken promise or a shortcut. Who else will ask the hard questions? Guardians keep us honest in the face of self-delusion or blind spots. For example, one executive I worked with learned that his frontline professionals were convinced that new data he wanted to capture would be used in a punitive way. He had no intention of doing so, and had dismissed their concerns as ridiculous. But, in fact, he had provided no assurances to the contrary, and such abuses had occurred in the past. From the employees’ point of view, he later acknowledged, their questions were legitimate. Seeing this, he gave them practical assurances — and backed them up over time through his actions.

David Hain's insight:

Meet the guardians of your organisation! you might think of them as luddites, but that's probably not helping your change effort!

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