Business change
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Change Management Insights from a Fortune 500 Apparel Company’s Restructuring

Change Management Insights from a Fortune 500 Apparel Company’s Restructuring | Business change | Scoop.it
Recently, consulting firm Emergent partnered with a Fortune 500 apparel company to undertake the biggest business transformation in the company’s history.

Via Jesse Jacoby & Emergent
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Business change
Getting ahead of the curve in business
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Innovating Beyond Bullet Points: Eight ideas on turning talking points into action-points. — Medium

Innovating Beyond Bullet Points: Eight ideas on turning talking points into action-points. — Medium | Business change | Scoop.it
Innovation is not just a bullet point in a drab strategy presentation. And although I boldly stated that as the first line of this article… I realize that sadly, that’s exactly what it is for many organizations. Often times just mere lip service and an empty promise of greener pastures, ticking the box to make the board or some other group of stakeholders think we’re being innovative.
So innovation is relegated to living in a world of bullet-pointancy, an ideal in a presentation rather than something actionable. This inaction doesn’t happen because leaders don’t want to innovate. I think they do; they just don’t know how to innovate.
David Hain's insight:

Steal the wheel, don't reinvent it! Plus other excellent tips on making innovation a sustainable organisation commodity!

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When Startups Fail, Silicon Valley’s Millennial CEOs Like to Share Feelings

When Startups Fail, Silicon Valley’s Millennial CEOs Like to Share Feelings | Business change | Scoop.it
When it comes to bad news, many companies bury the announcement in a boilerplate press release. Silicon Valley entrepreneur Ryo Chiba decided the best medicine was to narrate his company’s layoffs in excruciating detail.

“I closed my eyes and counted to three while in an empty and dark conference room,” wrote Mr. Chiba, the 26-year-old co-founder of San Francisco marketing startup Tint, in a blog post last month. “I told myself that I was ready to tell my friend and co-worker that I would be laying him off.”


Mr. Chiba’s 3,000-word essay admitted business blunders, revealed Tint’s cash balance, revenue and salaries, and gave an impassioned play-by-play of the “brutal and ugly” process behind layoffs.

“Suddenly, the valve in my heart twists open, and all of the feelings start flooding out: The disappointment, the guilt, the anger, and sadness,” he wrote.
David Hain's insight:

Very human change story about millennial promise dashed and the mistakes that led to it.

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Leading Change: Why Transformation Efforts Fail

Leading Change: Why Transformation Efforts Fail | Business change | Scoop.it
John P. Kotter is renowned for his work on leading organizational change. In 1995, when this article was first published, he had just completed a ten-year study of more than 100 companies that attempted such a transformation. Here he shares the results of his observations, outlining the eight largest errors that can doom these efforts and explaining the general lessons that encourage success.

Unsuccessful transitions almost always founder during at least one of the following phases: generating a sense of urgency, establishing a powerful guiding coalition, developing a vision, communicating the vision clearly and often, removing obstacles, planning for and creating short-term wins, avoiding premature declarations of victory, and embedding changes in the corporate culture.

Realizing that change usually takes a long time, says Kotter, can improve the chances of success.
David Hain's insight:

Resisting the classic Kotter change model - not perfect, or as simple as it looks, but as relevant as any since 1995!

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Why Leading Through Fear Is Cheap Leadership

Why Leading Through Fear Is Cheap Leadership | Business change | Scoop.it
Using fear to motivate people is cheap leadership. Any two-bit dictator can use fear to get things done. It takes no finesse or intelligence and ultimately works against the leader. The temporary spike in motivation from stoking people’s fears is offset by the long-term impacts of deep resentment, performance-draining anxiety, and ill will. More evolved and thoughtful leaders choose to pull people toward the behaviors they want, instead of pushing them away from the behaviors they don’t want. For example, my wife uses a compliment system to promote good behavior with our kids. Each time one of them finishes a chore they get to put a small stone (a “compliment”) in a jar that’s been set aside just for them. Then, when they’ve gathered enough stones they get a small reward, like dinner at Chuck E. Cheese. 

If you want workers to act like adults, you have to lead like an adult. Instead of constantly drawing their attention to the bad things that will happen if they mess up, work with them to identify the actions and priorities that will increase their likelihood of succeeding.
David Hain's insight:

Adults leading adults - the only way to generate sustainable change!

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Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, July 19, 4:48 AM
Why Leading Through Fear Is Cheap Leadership
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The ‘how’ of transformation | McKinsey & Company

The ‘how’ of transformation | McKinsey & Company | Business change | Scoop.it
Our experience suggests that, regardless of the circumstances, real transformation happens only when a leadership team embraces the idea of holistic change in how the business operates—tackling all the factors that create value for an organization, including top line, bottom line, capital expenditures, and working capital. This is easier said than done. Ordinary approaches to transformation typically deliver ordinary (and often suboptimal) results.

To achieve extraordinary results, we believe a comprehensive, highly disciplined methodology—encompassing both the “what” and the “how”—is needed (exhibit). The “what” entails the smooth movement of the many specific transformation ideas and initiatives through three phases: from independent diligence to planning to implementation. These phases will sound familiar to the seasoned executive.
David Hain's insight:

Most transformation efforts still fail! McKinsey's take on what to do about it is valid, if easier to write about than implement!

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How technology disrupted the truth | Katharine Viner

How technology disrupted the truth | Katharine Viner | Business change | Scoop.it
Social media has swallowed the news – threatening the funding of public-interest reporting and ushering in an era when everyone has their own facts. But the consequences go far beyond journalism
David Hain's insight:

Brilliant journalism on how distinguishing truth in the social era is a tricky, yet potentially critical issue. Regimes can change as a result...!

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What Entrepreneurs Get Wrong – Harvard Business Review

What Entrepreneurs Get Wrong – Harvard Business Review | Business change | Scoop.it
For many entrepreneurs, the process of launching a company begins with the lightbulb moment when they conceive of a breakthrough idea for a new product or service. Very often, they are so passionate about the idea that they believe its merits will be self-evident to prospective customers—that the innovation is so obviously superior it will sell itself. Entrepreneurs who avoid that delusion may think of their initial sales as a chicken-and-egg problem: They realize that getting buy-in from potential customers is a top priority, but until they design and build the product (which often requires securing funding, assembling a team, and many other tasks), how could they possibly make a sales call?



Both attitudes fail to recognize a simple fact: Salesmanship is central to the success of any young company, and entrepreneurs ignore this at their peril. Yet many do ignore it, in large part because they have little sales experience and have probably not taken classes in how to sell, even if they have formal business education (as Suzanne Fogel and colleagues explained in “Teaching Sales,” HBR July–August 2012). For those in search of guidance, the research and advice on salesmanship may not offer much help: The vast majority of techniques, models, and strategies are aimed at large, established companies, not start-ups, which tend to face a unique set of objections from prospects. And when entrepreneurs get around to making those crucial first sales, they often make common mistakes, such as not considering the strategic advantages of a particular customer or extending a deep discount just to make the sale.
David Hain's insight:

How to grow through sales skills, the Harvard way...

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Becoming Whole at work: Personal Development to Change the Organization 

Becoming Whole at work: Personal Development to Change the Organization  | Business change | Scoop.it

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David Hain's insight:

Interesting case study on personal development as a key vehicle for big change - lighting small fires...

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10 Breakthrough Technologies 2016

10 Breakthrough Technologies 2016 | Business change | Scoop.it

Which of today's emerging technologies have a chance at solving a big problem and opening up new opportunities? Here are our picks. The 10 on this list all had an impressive milestone in the past year or are on the verge of one. These are technologies you need to know about right now.

David Hain's insight:

The next disruptors may be here already - according to MIT!

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Organize for Complexity - Keynote by Niels Pflaeging at Agile Telekom Convention 2015 (Bonn/D)

Keynote by Niels on how to Organize for Complexity at Deutsche Telekom in Bonn, Germany.
David Hain's insight:

Uncommon sense on reframing the organisation for transformation, by Nils Pflaeging!

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The question you ask is the drop that starts the ripple of new ideas | EY Better Working World

The question you ask is the drop that starts the ripple of new ideas | EY Better Working World | Business change | Scoop.it
A question like “Is there a better way?” is all it takes to start a ripple of action, innovation and fresh thinking that can change the world
David Hain's insight:

How is a good question like the beat of a butterfly's wing? Answer in this video...

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Creating a continuous learning environment 

Creating a continuous learning environment  | Business change | Scoop.it
“ In this issue of CFO Insights, we look at what is behind the push for continuous learning and offer suggestions for how finance chiefs can work with HR to advocate for its delivery.”
Via Marc Wachtfogel, Ph.D., Roger Francis
David Hain's insight:
Learn faster, change faster, max your competitive advantage!
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Everyone is born creative, but it is educated out of us at school

Everyone is born creative, but it is educated out of us at school | Business change | Scoop.it
Young children fizz with ideas. But the moment they go to school, they begin to lose the freedom to explore, take risks and experiment.

We spend our childhoods being taught the artificial skill of passing exams. We learn to give teachers what they expect. By the time we get into industry, we have been conditioned to conform. We spend our days in meetings and talk about “thinking outside the box”. But rarely do we step outside it.

The sad truth is that schools were never designed to produce creativity. Not many people are aware of it, but the education systems in the US and many other countries are based on the 19th-century Prussian model. Children were taught to obey, not to challenge or think creatively. That’s why you stand to attention when the teacher walks into the class. It’s why from the US to China, children wear uniforms.
David Hain's insight:

Giving people the confidence to be creative is huge - but we need to help them unlearn how they were taught!

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Minimise threat and maximise reward to accelerate change

Minimise threat and maximise reward to accelerate change | Business change | Scoop.it

Research shows that people’s response to change is common, at a biological level.

These patterns act as a short cut; you don’t have to work out how to do something like open a door every time. These types of routine or regular activities are run by the basal ganglia which is much more efficient in terms of energy usage. After a period of time, our job becomes one of these regular actions.

We get comfortable doing the ‘old’ process and routine. The role is predictable. Doing something different to the norm, is the equivalent of telling the brain something is wrong. This activates the emotional centre, the amygdale which controls our flight or fight response. The new behaviour is registered as an error and as a potential threat in the brain. Whilst the prefrontal cortex can override the more primitive emotional centre this takes a lot of energy and it soon becomes fatigued.

Unfortunately traditional change management approaches are not compatible with this new understanding of the brain’s functioning. Bonuses and incentives or threats of job loss will not overcome the biological reaction to change.

David Hain's insight:

We are all biological beings. Learn about how that insight can change your success rate in change processes!

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Can Your 'Chief Data Officer' Perform Miracles?

Can Your 'Chief Data Officer' Perform Miracles? | Business change | Scoop.it
Big Data can do amazing things – help treat cancer, predict earthquakes, and manoeuvre a spacecraft across the surface of Mars. But this doesn’t mean that the people behind these fantastic feats are miracle workers. I’ve got the impression, however, that sometimes they are expected to be.

A somewhat alarming statistic highlighted in a recent Gartner report is that only 50% of Chief Data Officers are successful in their posts. This is partly due to the high turnover rates. Experienced CDOs are always in demand, but are there other factors at play here?

I believe so, and this belief is reinforced by a report published by IBM, the Chief Data Officer Playbook, which suggests that CDOs are often expected to do too much, too quickly. Often they find themselves held back by lack of infrastructure, or even strategic thinking about what their role involves.

The report’s author – IBM Big Data and analytics research leader Rebecca Shockley, told me “I think what we’re seeing right now is a lack of focus – and the expectations that are being put on CDOs is that they are expected to do things that the organization just isn’t capable of yet.
David Hain's insight:

Don't shoot the messenger, set clear expectations about the potential for big data to transform the enterprise!

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3 Ways to Navigate the Politics of Change

3 Ways to Navigate the Politics of Change | Business change | Scoop.it
We create implementation strategies and learning plans to help people develop the necessary job-based skills needed to execute the changes. Then we watch the best strategies and plans get derailed by emotions, politics and burnout — all of which seem out of our control.

Enter change management skills, like the ability to sense and shift strategies, inspire and engage, and navigate politics. Change management skills are valuable, sustainable and often overlooked, but they can be learned. They greatly increase the chance that change efforts will succeed, and they offer competitive advantage as organizations grow and adapt to a relentlessly shifting external environment.

Navigating the politics of change is arguably the most difficult change management skill. But CLOs who excel at building change management capabilities offer value that every organization needs. We can help teams use political dynamics to increase engagement, passion and change effort success.
David Hain's insight:

Change is always a political act. Treat it as such!

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Evaluate the Environment

Evaluate the Environment | Business change | Scoop.it
In the subway system in Stockholm you will find a set of stairs next to an escalator. As you can imagine most people take the escalator and not the stairs. Why not? Using the escalator will deliver you to the same location as using the stairs. It requires less energy. Everybody else is using the stairs.

One organization thought beyond those things. They recognized that if people used the stairs, it would be better for them. They could have posted signs telling people to use the stairs instead of the escalator. Or they could have put a poster up encouraging people to choose the stairs. We all know how effective signs and posters are at changing behavior. 

Instead, they focused on changing the environment. They asked, “what could be done to make using the stairs more inviting that using the escalator?” The answer was to make the stairs more fun. The stairs are now piano keys and they play notes when pedestrians walk on them. The result is 66% more people than normal now choose to use the stairs instead of the escalator. That’s a pretty good change in behavior if you ask us. When encouraging behavior change in your team, don’t look for ways to “fix” them. Look instead for ways to make the environment support the desired behaviors. 
David Hain's insight:

A great example of how to use creative thinking to nudge for change!

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The evolution of social technologies | McKinsey & Company

The evolution of social technologies | McKinsey & Company | Business change | Scoop.it
McKinsey’s long-running research into enterprise use of social technologies provides a unique vantage point for examining the nature and pace of this evolution. Surveys of more than 2,700 global executives over each of the last ten years have probed technology diffusion within organizations and the patterns of technology adoption.1
Our review of survey data spanning the years 2005 to 2015 suggests three distinct, progressively more sophisticated phases of usage. Companies in our sample began with trial-and-error applications—for example, using social platforms such as YouTube to expand their marketing mix to attract younger consumers. They then switched their focus to fostering collaboration. Most recently, some have deployed social technologies to catalyze the cocreation of strategy. Across this spectrum, we also found that companies shifted the mix of technologies and expanded the terrain of application.
David Hain's insight:

The story of how companies have used social technology for change. It's not finished yet...

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Engage for Success

Engage for Success | Business change | Scoop.it
Introducing Cathy Brown, Executive Director of Engage for Success, who aim to create great workplaces in the UK through the commitment, energy, and creativity of the people that work in them. Cathy delivered a wonderful interview on questions of Leading Innovation, Creativity and Enterprise (LICE). Please listen in here:

David Hain's insight:

The 4 x P of innovation, brought to  you via @AcademyOfRock!

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Why storytelling is critical to change management

Why storytelling is critical to change management | Business change | Scoop.it
The age of disruption is forcing leaders to communicate change in a different way, argues Gabrielle Dolan.

Via Blue Sky Change
David Hain's insight:

Change needs a narrative, but a batch of powerful stories is even better...!

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RSA ANIMATE: Re-Imagining Work

Dave Coplin, Chief Envisioning Officer at Microsoft, imagines what might be possible if more organisations embraced the full, empowering potential of technology & encouraged an open, collaborative & flexible working culture.
David Hain's insight:

A plea to do things differently - stop being too busy being busy and think about it!

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Virgin Atlantic just used behavioral science to ‘nudge’ its pilots into using less fuel. It worked

Virgin Atlantic just used behavioral science to ‘nudge’ its pilots into using less fuel. It worked | Business change | Scoop.it
In an unusual experiment that could have major implications for the role of corporations in fighting climate change, Richard Branson’s Virgin Atlantic Airways recently teamed up with economists to try to “nudge” the company’s pilots to use less fuel, using a variety of behavioral interventions.

And it apparently worked. The intervention was so cost effective, the researchers say, that it “outperforms every other reported carbon abatement technology of which we are aware.”

David Hain's insight:

An example of how nudge psychology can be used to bring about change.

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How to Upgrade the Industrial Organization to the Age of Ideas? 

How to Upgrade the Industrial Organization to the Age of Ideas?  | Business change | Scoop.it
Do you suffer from corporate obedience? Are you wealthier but not healthier and happier than your parents? Does your employer demand your “all” without guaranteeing a continuity of employment in return? Are you stressed, anxious, disengaged or frustrated?
Fair chance that you are trapped in an old-style steam-engine organization, custom-built to suppress collaborating, problem-solving, innovating and socializing. Perfect for repetitive tasks, standardization, and efficiency. Disastrous for inspiration, purpose, trust, innovation and making a difference to the greater good. So, what can you do to upgrade your industrial organization?

Mark Powell and Jonathan Gifford wrote the book “My Steam Engine is Broken – taking the organization from the industrial era to the age of ideas.” It aligns with Gary Hamel’s work and Frederic Laloux’s Reinventing Organizations. More and more people are waking up to the poignant fact that our workplaces are so old-fashioned that they don’t serve their purpose anymore. Modern organizations need to be innovative and agile, but many are not.

But where do you start to change? The organization as a whole is a daunting job to change. Powell and Gifford propose to transform the steam engine bit by bit by tackling the ten paradoxes that steam-engine organizations do that actively prevent them from achieving their goals while they think they do a good job.
David Hain's insight:

10 challenges to transform into an ideas organisation successfully!

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Mike McGrail's curator insight, June 17, 8:43 AM
Share your insight
William Smith's curator insight, June 18, 12:47 PM
I am reminded of reading about Skunkworks and how that strategy successfully brought innovation to the larger organization. It takes fearless leadership to bring this "upgrade" about.
Ian Berry's curator insight, June 18, 6:15 PM
I resonate with a lot in this article particularly “When I have permission to be a human being as a leader, I don’t have to be perfect which means I don’t have to wear this front, which means I can connect with people more deeply. A lot of (my work) is shedding the armor.” The strong hero leader is dead. Long live the emergent, role-sharing leader."
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Why we need change management

How change actually happens and why we need change management. From Tim Creasey's presentation at the Value Selling & Realization Summit, Feb 29, 2016. @timcreasey www.linkedin.com/in/timcreasey
David Hain's insight:

Excellent 3 min presentation about how change really happens and why all transformation efforts need to be concerned about it!

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Elasticity: Moving But Rooted

Elasticity: Moving But Rooted | Business change | Scoop.it
Elasticity is a safe behaviour: it gives the appearance of being engaged without having to actually engage. It’s the space for ambiguity that allows us to see which way the wind is truly blowing. Constrained organisations will exhibit elasticity at every level: not because people are disengaged, but because they are not fully engaged. They are in a middle space where they are engaged, but not owning. Present, but not invested.

The Dynamic Change framework describes a route to transformation: an early hurdle that it has to overcome is elasticity.
David Hain's insight:

Without huge, sustained effort, the natural resting point for change efforts is where they started. Beware elasticity!

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