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The Awesome Power Of Knowledge Networks

The Awesome Power Of Knowledge Networks | Business change | Scoop.it
The Awesome Power of Knowledge Networks - http://t.co/P9vztSeK - Zulma Acevedo - #innovation #skills #collab #mgmt #sm...
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Business change
Getting ahead of the curve in business
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8 fundamental questions a leader needs to answer

8 fundamental questions a leader needs to answer | Business change | Scoop.it
EXPERIENCE HAS TAUGHT ME MANY THINGS. One of the most valuable lessons has been, that in order to successfully adapt to any change, you must begin by asking the right questions. Not only this, you must ask and answer them in the right order. This is true regardless of whether the change is big or small or affects us as individuals, our teams or our organisations.

Failure to answer the right questions is guaranteed to make the change harder than it needs to be, more costly, deliver a less valuable outcome and take a higher toll on your most valuable asset – your people.

Creating an organisation that is more adaptive than it is today is an organisational change and just like any other, it needs to start by answering the right questions. The irony is, of course, that in order to successfully transition from where your organisation is today, to where it needs to be, requires the same capability (i.e. being adaptive) that it is actually wanting to create. This makes creating The Adaptive Organisation one of the toughest changes of all and helps to explain why so few organisations succeed. It’s also why starting with what I call The Adaptive Fundamentals is critically important.
David Hain's insight:

Good introduction to The Adaptive Fundamentals, from Kate Christiansen!

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The Fourth Industrial Revolution: what it means and how to respond

The Fourth Industrial Revolution: what it means and how to respond | Business change | Scoop.it
We stand on the brink of a technological revolution that will fundamentally alter the way we live, work, and relate to one another. In its scale, scope, and complexity, the transformation will be unlike anything humankind has experienced before. We do not yet know just how it will unfold, but one thing is clear: the response to it must be integrated and comprehensive, involving all stakeholders of the global polity, from the public and private sectors to academia and civil society.

The First Industrial Revolution used water and steam power to mechanize production. The Second used electric power to create mass production. The Third used electronics and information technology to automate production. Now a Fourth Industrial Revolution is building on the Third, the digital revolution that has been occurring since the middle of the last century. It is characterized by a fusion of technologies that is blurring the lines between the physical, digital, and biological spheres.

David Hain's insight:

Are you geared for the 4th Industrial Revolution? thoughtful piece form the World Economic Forum.

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Strategic decisions: When can you trust your gut? | McKinsey & Company

Strategic decisions: When can you trust your gut? | McKinsey & Company | Business change | Scoop.it
Gary Klein: The premortem technique is a sneaky way to get people to do contrarian, devil’s advocate thinking without encountering resistance. If a project goes poorly, there will be a lessons-learned session that looks at what went wrong and why the project failed—like a medical postmortem. Why don’t we do that up front? Before a project starts, we should say, “We’re looking in a crystal ball, and this project has failed; it’s a fiasco. Now, everybody, take two minutes and write down all the reasons why you think the project failed.”

The logic is that instead of showing people that you are smart because you can come up with a good plan, you show you’re smart by thinking of insightful reasons why this project might go south. If you make it part of your corporate culture, then you create an interesting competition: “I want to come up with some possible problem that other people haven’t even thought of.” The whole dynamic changes from trying to avoid anything that might disrupt harmony to trying to surface potential problems.

Daniel Kahneman: The premortem is a great idea. I mentioned it at Davos—giving full credit to Gary—and the chairman of a large corporation said it was worth coming to Davos for. The beauty of the premortem is that it is very easy to do. My guess is that, in general, doing a premortem on a plan that is about to be adopted won’t cause it to be abandoned. But it will probably be tweaked in ways that everybody will recognize as beneficial. So the premortem is a low-cost, high-payoff kind of thing.
David Hain's insight:

Don't wait for it to go wrong, agree 2 great decision strategists. Use the premortem technique!

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Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, September 17, 3:11 AM
Strategic decisions: When can you trust your gut? | McKinsey & Company
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Scaling culture change: A winning ingredient for rapid expansion

Scaling culture change: A winning ingredient for rapid expansion | Business change | Scoop.it
When small companies grow rapidly, the culture can get lost in a sea of new people, processes, geographic expansion, aggressive growth targets, and the avalanche of changes needed to scale. The culture can become a boat anchor, dragging behind the desired direction and pulling people in the wrong direction. But when senior leaders make a conscious decision to keep the best of the cultural elements that brought the company success in the first place, great things can happen.

Cafe Rio Mexican Grill did just that. In 2011, Dave Gagnon, a former Burger King senior vice president of North America company operations and training, took over as CEO and COO. Andy Hooper, who had led the culture-shaping work at Burger King, joined Cafe Rio as chief people officer. The organization had an outstanding culture, and was in its third year of nearly double-digit comparable sales growth. But to grow rapidly, the executive leadership team needed to codify the culture that was largely built on ‘tribal knowledge transfer’ to scale for national expansion.
David Hain's insight:

Case study download on how to create the wind that fuses the campfires of change!

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Minimise threat and maximise reward to accelerate change

Minimise threat and maximise reward to accelerate change | Business change | Scoop.it

Research shows that people’s response to change is common, at a biological level.

These patterns act as a short cut; you don’t have to work out how to do something like open a door every time. These types of routine or regular activities are run by the basal ganglia which is much more efficient in terms of energy usage. After a period of time, our job becomes one of these regular actions.

We get comfortable doing the ‘old’ process and routine. The role is predictable. Doing something different to the norm, is the equivalent of telling the brain something is wrong. This activates the emotional centre, the amygdale which controls our flight or fight response. The new behaviour is registered as an error and as a potential threat in the brain. Whilst the prefrontal cortex can override the more primitive emotional centre this takes a lot of energy and it soon becomes fatigued.

Unfortunately traditional change management approaches are not compatible with this new understanding of the brain’s functioning. Bonuses and incentives or threats of job loss will not overcome the biological reaction to change.

David Hain's insight:

We are all biological beings. Learn about how that insight can change your success rate in change processes!

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Can Your 'Chief Data Officer' Perform Miracles?

Can Your 'Chief Data Officer' Perform Miracles? | Business change | Scoop.it
Big Data can do amazing things – help treat cancer, predict earthquakes, and manoeuvre a spacecraft across the surface of Mars. But this doesn’t mean that the people behind these fantastic feats are miracle workers. I’ve got the impression, however, that sometimes they are expected to be.

A somewhat alarming statistic highlighted in a recent Gartner report is that only 50% of Chief Data Officers are successful in their posts. This is partly due to the high turnover rates. Experienced CDOs are always in demand, but are there other factors at play here?

I believe so, and this belief is reinforced by a report published by IBM, the Chief Data Officer Playbook, which suggests that CDOs are often expected to do too much, too quickly. Often they find themselves held back by lack of infrastructure, or even strategic thinking about what their role involves.

The report’s author – IBM Big Data and analytics research leader Rebecca Shockley, told me “I think what we’re seeing right now is a lack of focus – and the expectations that are being put on CDOs is that they are expected to do things that the organization just isn’t capable of yet.
David Hain's insight:

Don't shoot the messenger, set clear expectations about the potential for big data to transform the enterprise!

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3 Ways to Navigate the Politics of Change

3 Ways to Navigate the Politics of Change | Business change | Scoop.it
We create implementation strategies and learning plans to help people develop the necessary job-based skills needed to execute the changes. Then we watch the best strategies and plans get derailed by emotions, politics and burnout — all of which seem out of our control.

Enter change management skills, like the ability to sense and shift strategies, inspire and engage, and navigate politics. Change management skills are valuable, sustainable and often overlooked, but they can be learned. They greatly increase the chance that change efforts will succeed, and they offer competitive advantage as organizations grow and adapt to a relentlessly shifting external environment.

Navigating the politics of change is arguably the most difficult change management skill. But CLOs who excel at building change management capabilities offer value that every organization needs. We can help teams use political dynamics to increase engagement, passion and change effort success.
David Hain's insight:

Change is always a political act. Treat it as such!

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Evaluate the Environment

Evaluate the Environment | Business change | Scoop.it
In the subway system in Stockholm you will find a set of stairs next to an escalator. As you can imagine most people take the escalator and not the stairs. Why not? Using the escalator will deliver you to the same location as using the stairs. It requires less energy. Everybody else is using the stairs.

One organization thought beyond those things. They recognized that if people used the stairs, it would be better for them. They could have posted signs telling people to use the stairs instead of the escalator. Or they could have put a poster up encouraging people to choose the stairs. We all know how effective signs and posters are at changing behavior. 

Instead, they focused on changing the environment. They asked, “what could be done to make using the stairs more inviting that using the escalator?” The answer was to make the stairs more fun. The stairs are now piano keys and they play notes when pedestrians walk on them. The result is 66% more people than normal now choose to use the stairs instead of the escalator. That’s a pretty good change in behavior if you ask us. When encouraging behavior change in your team, don’t look for ways to “fix” them. Look instead for ways to make the environment support the desired behaviors. 
David Hain's insight:

A great example of how to use creative thinking to nudge for change!

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The evolution of social technologies | McKinsey & Company

The evolution of social technologies | McKinsey & Company | Business change | Scoop.it
McKinsey’s long-running research into enterprise use of social technologies provides a unique vantage point for examining the nature and pace of this evolution. Surveys of more than 2,700 global executives over each of the last ten years have probed technology diffusion within organizations and the patterns of technology adoption.1
Our review of survey data spanning the years 2005 to 2015 suggests three distinct, progressively more sophisticated phases of usage. Companies in our sample began with trial-and-error applications—for example, using social platforms such as YouTube to expand their marketing mix to attract younger consumers. They then switched their focus to fostering collaboration. Most recently, some have deployed social technologies to catalyze the cocreation of strategy. Across this spectrum, we also found that companies shifted the mix of technologies and expanded the terrain of application.
David Hain's insight:

The story of how companies have used social technology for change. It's not finished yet...

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Engage for Success

Engage for Success | Business change | Scoop.it
Introducing Cathy Brown, Executive Director of Engage for Success, who aim to create great workplaces in the UK through the commitment, energy, and creativity of the people that work in them. Cathy delivered a wonderful interview on questions of Leading Innovation, Creativity and Enterprise (LICE). Please listen in here:

David Hain's insight:

The 4 x P of innovation, brought to  you via @AcademyOfRock!

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Why storytelling is critical to change management

Why storytelling is critical to change management | Business change | Scoop.it
The age of disruption is forcing leaders to communicate change in a different way, argues Gabrielle Dolan.

Via Blue Sky Change
David Hain's insight:

Change needs a narrative, but a batch of powerful stories is even better...!

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RSA ANIMATE: Re-Imagining Work

Dave Coplin, Chief Envisioning Officer at Microsoft, imagines what might be possible if more organisations embraced the full, empowering potential of technology & encouraged an open, collaborative & flexible working culture.
David Hain's insight:

A plea to do things differently - stop being too busy being busy and think about it!

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Virgin Atlantic just used behavioral science to ‘nudge’ its pilots into using less fuel. It worked

Virgin Atlantic just used behavioral science to ‘nudge’ its pilots into using less fuel. It worked | Business change | Scoop.it
In an unusual experiment that could have major implications for the role of corporations in fighting climate change, Richard Branson’s Virgin Atlantic Airways recently teamed up with economists to try to “nudge” the company’s pilots to use less fuel, using a variety of behavioral interventions.

And it apparently worked. The intervention was so cost effective, the researchers say, that it “outperforms every other reported carbon abatement technology of which we are aware.”

David Hain's insight:

An example of how nudge psychology can be used to bring about change.

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What Every Institutional Innovation Program Gets Wrong

What Every Institutional Innovation Program Gets Wrong | Business change | Scoop.it
In the last few years, many large organizations have reached the conclusion that the talent required to optimize their existing revenue sources is distinct from the talent required to invent the future. Today, the most savvy organizations will realize the need for a third team: those with the ability to take the refined ore of a new idea and shape it into a commercially viable and sustainable business.
David Hain's insight:

Good ideas abound, but rarely travel far or wide. Does your organisation have scalers who make innovations into the way people work? 

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Why are we afraid of change? The science of uncertainty - Unstuck

Why are we afraid of change? The science of uncertainty - Unstuck | Business change | Scoop.it
So many of us struggle to change careers, to leave a bad relationship, to go back to school. In my social circle, I can think of just two friends who are notably good at change; the rest (myself included) tend to freeze up when we consider breaking with the past in a significant way. Neuroscientist Dean Burnett’s new book, “Idiot Brain,” addresses the ways our brains trip us up. I asked him why humans might be wired to resist making changes even when we say we want them.

“In an evolutionary sense, the brain doesn’t like uncertainty. Anything uncertain is potentially a threat,” Burnett says.

In talking to experts in areas including psychology, neuroscience, and behavioral economics, I found four distinct categories that tend to hold us back from making changes. I’ll cover each in a separate post, starting with the prospect of uncertainty: why we appear wired to pay a lot of attention to it — and sometimes to dread it.
David Hain's insight:

Science offers some solutions to the uncertainty of change to help overcome our hard-wired brains!

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The power of artificial intelligence

The power of artificial intelligence | Business change | Scoop.it
“AI will be a game changer, and benefit billions. Today two billion people in the world go hungry, so righting the imbalanced distribution of food and dealing with the worldwide agricultural system is a good start. Technologies such as GPS have increased the yield in developed countries but have not been widely used in developing countries. Now we can level that playing field with smartphones and access to the cloud.

“The ability to increase the yield of farmland under tillage in developing countries is a mission-critical challenge. I see that as within reach using these technologies. We already have autonomous drones for agriculture, for both shooting seeds into the ground, and fertilising.”

In India, Tata Rallis, an internet of things (IoT) project, uses drones to administer pesticides. The aim is to harness data, such as crop health and soil conditions, to boost output.

Mr Hidary said: “By extension, drones are able to pick fruits, almonds and other kind of foodstuffs that are difficult to collect for humans. Drones are cheap – about $100 (£75) – and could be used by communities for farming and other tasks, and don’t have to be owned by one person.” Smartphones are now more widely used by people in developing countries. Soon we could expect instant medical advice and prescriptions from “smartphone laboratories”, said Mr Hidary.
David Hain's insight:

AI has the potential to change the world - also to make it worse! Will we manage to change our behaviour enough to keep int on the light side?

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Innovating Beyond Bullet Points: Eight ideas on turning talking points into action-points. — Medium

Innovating Beyond Bullet Points: Eight ideas on turning talking points into action-points. — Medium | Business change | Scoop.it
Innovation is not just a bullet point in a drab strategy presentation. And although I boldly stated that as the first line of this article… I realize that sadly, that’s exactly what it is for many organizations. Often times just mere lip service and an empty promise of greener pastures, ticking the box to make the board or some other group of stakeholders think we’re being innovative.
So innovation is relegated to living in a world of bullet-pointancy, an ideal in a presentation rather than something actionable. This inaction doesn’t happen because leaders don’t want to innovate. I think they do; they just don’t know how to innovate.
David Hain's insight:

Steal the wheel, don't reinvent it! Plus other excellent tips on making innovation a sustainable organisation commodity!

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When Startups Fail, Silicon Valley’s Millennial CEOs Like to Share Feelings

When Startups Fail, Silicon Valley’s Millennial CEOs Like to Share Feelings | Business change | Scoop.it
When it comes to bad news, many companies bury the announcement in a boilerplate press release. Silicon Valley entrepreneur Ryo Chiba decided the best medicine was to narrate his company’s layoffs in excruciating detail.

“I closed my eyes and counted to three while in an empty and dark conference room,” wrote Mr. Chiba, the 26-year-old co-founder of San Francisco marketing startup Tint, in a blog post last month. “I told myself that I was ready to tell my friend and co-worker that I would be laying him off.”


Mr. Chiba’s 3,000-word essay admitted business blunders, revealed Tint’s cash balance, revenue and salaries, and gave an impassioned play-by-play of the “brutal and ugly” process behind layoffs.

“Suddenly, the valve in my heart twists open, and all of the feelings start flooding out: The disappointment, the guilt, the anger, and sadness,” he wrote.
David Hain's insight:

Very human change story about millennial promise dashed and the mistakes that led to it.

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Leading Change: Why Transformation Efforts Fail

Leading Change: Why Transformation Efforts Fail | Business change | Scoop.it
John P. Kotter is renowned for his work on leading organizational change. In 1995, when this article was first published, he had just completed a ten-year study of more than 100 companies that attempted such a transformation. Here he shares the results of his observations, outlining the eight largest errors that can doom these efforts and explaining the general lessons that encourage success.

Unsuccessful transitions almost always founder during at least one of the following phases: generating a sense of urgency, establishing a powerful guiding coalition, developing a vision, communicating the vision clearly and often, removing obstacles, planning for and creating short-term wins, avoiding premature declarations of victory, and embedding changes in the corporate culture.

Realizing that change usually takes a long time, says Kotter, can improve the chances of success.
David Hain's insight:

Resisting the classic Kotter change model - not perfect, or as simple as it looks, but as relevant as any since 1995!

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Why Leading Through Fear Is Cheap Leadership

Why Leading Through Fear Is Cheap Leadership | Business change | Scoop.it
Using fear to motivate people is cheap leadership. Any two-bit dictator can use fear to get things done. It takes no finesse or intelligence and ultimately works against the leader. The temporary spike in motivation from stoking people’s fears is offset by the long-term impacts of deep resentment, performance-draining anxiety, and ill will. More evolved and thoughtful leaders choose to pull people toward the behaviors they want, instead of pushing them away from the behaviors they don’t want. For example, my wife uses a compliment system to promote good behavior with our kids. Each time one of them finishes a chore they get to put a small stone (a “compliment”) in a jar that’s been set aside just for them. Then, when they’ve gathered enough stones they get a small reward, like dinner at Chuck E. Cheese. 

If you want workers to act like adults, you have to lead like an adult. Instead of constantly drawing their attention to the bad things that will happen if they mess up, work with them to identify the actions and priorities that will increase their likelihood of succeeding.
David Hain's insight:

Adults leading adults - the only way to generate sustainable change!

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Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, July 19, 4:48 AM
Why Leading Through Fear Is Cheap Leadership
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The ‘how’ of transformation | McKinsey & Company

The ‘how’ of transformation | McKinsey & Company | Business change | Scoop.it
Our experience suggests that, regardless of the circumstances, real transformation happens only when a leadership team embraces the idea of holistic change in how the business operates—tackling all the factors that create value for an organization, including top line, bottom line, capital expenditures, and working capital. This is easier said than done. Ordinary approaches to transformation typically deliver ordinary (and often suboptimal) results.

To achieve extraordinary results, we believe a comprehensive, highly disciplined methodology—encompassing both the “what” and the “how”—is needed (exhibit). The “what” entails the smooth movement of the many specific transformation ideas and initiatives through three phases: from independent diligence to planning to implementation. These phases will sound familiar to the seasoned executive.
David Hain's insight:

Most transformation efforts still fail! McKinsey's take on what to do about it is valid, if easier to write about than implement!

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How technology disrupted the truth | Katharine Viner

How technology disrupted the truth | Katharine Viner | Business change | Scoop.it
Social media has swallowed the news – threatening the funding of public-interest reporting and ushering in an era when everyone has their own facts. But the consequences go far beyond journalism
David Hain's insight:

Brilliant journalism on how distinguishing truth in the social era is a tricky, yet potentially critical issue. Regimes can change as a result...!

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What Entrepreneurs Get Wrong – Harvard Business Review

What Entrepreneurs Get Wrong – Harvard Business Review | Business change | Scoop.it
For many entrepreneurs, the process of launching a company begins with the lightbulb moment when they conceive of a breakthrough idea for a new product or service. Very often, they are so passionate about the idea that they believe its merits will be self-evident to prospective customers—that the innovation is so obviously superior it will sell itself. Entrepreneurs who avoid that delusion may think of their initial sales as a chicken-and-egg problem: They realize that getting buy-in from potential customers is a top priority, but until they design and build the product (which often requires securing funding, assembling a team, and many other tasks), how could they possibly make a sales call?



Both attitudes fail to recognize a simple fact: Salesmanship is central to the success of any young company, and entrepreneurs ignore this at their peril. Yet many do ignore it, in large part because they have little sales experience and have probably not taken classes in how to sell, even if they have formal business education (as Suzanne Fogel and colleagues explained in “Teaching Sales,” HBR July–August 2012). For those in search of guidance, the research and advice on salesmanship may not offer much help: The vast majority of techniques, models, and strategies are aimed at large, established companies, not start-ups, which tend to face a unique set of objections from prospects. And when entrepreneurs get around to making those crucial first sales, they often make common mistakes, such as not considering the strategic advantages of a particular customer or extending a deep discount just to make the sale.
David Hain's insight:

How to grow through sales skills, the Harvard way...

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Becoming Whole at work: Personal Development to Change the Organization 

Becoming Whole at work: Personal Development to Change the Organization  | Business change | Scoop.it

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David Hain's insight:

Interesting case study on personal development as a key vehicle for big change - lighting small fires...

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10 Breakthrough Technologies 2016

10 Breakthrough Technologies 2016 | Business change | Scoop.it

Which of today's emerging technologies have a chance at solving a big problem and opening up new opportunities? Here are our picks. The 10 on this list all had an impressive milestone in the past year or are on the verge of one. These are technologies you need to know about right now.

David Hain's insight:

The next disruptors may be here already - according to MIT!

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