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Getting ahead of the curve in business
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Change From Within - New York Times

Change From Within - New York Times | Business change | Scoop.it
Change From Within
New York Times
Our era of procrastination has prompted the climate to change and our inability to regulate the nation's firearms has taken far too many innocent lives.

Via Brian Dawson
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Change Your Employees' Minds, Change Your Business

Change Your Employees' Minds, Change Your Business | Business change | Scoop.it

It's a very interesting approach in this article. Some experiments with monkeys show us how works the brain... I think the human being is not really differtent! [note mg]

 

Many business leaders don't care why employees do anything as long as they follow the company's rules, processes, cultural norms and laws.

 

But we've found that leaders can create and sustain stronger business results if they understand — and manage — how employees approach their work every day. When employees' thoughts, feelings, and beliefs are aligned with their daily work, they do that work better. Leaders, though, can be squeamish about approaching topics many think are better left to psychologists, so they don't even try to create alignment.

 

In the work underlying Beyond Performance, we found a technique we call 'laddering' that even the most hard-nosed business operators can feel comfortable with; the reason is that it closely resembles the "five whys" approach lean organizations use to get to the root causes of performance problems. Laddering mirrors the five whys, applying it to people's mindsets instead of operational problems....

 

Read  more: http://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2012/03/change_your_employees_minds_ch.html


Via Martin Gysler
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19 Tips for Success from @RichardBranson - @MelissahStanger

19 Tips for Success from @RichardBranson - @MelissahStanger | Business change | Scoop.it

Richard Branson founded Virgin in 1970 at the age of 20, and he hasn’t looked back. He’s the only entrepreneur to have built eight separate billion-dollar companies in eight different industries — and he did it all without a degree in business. We’ve compiled 19 of the best tips from his new book — 'Like a Virgin: Secrets They Won’t Teach You at Business School': http://amzn.to/S4xLsm

 

 

 

 

1. Don't do it if you don't enjoy it;

2. Be visible;

3. Choose your name wisely;

4. You can't run a business without taking risks;

5. You can't run a business without taking risks;

6. The first impression is everything. So is the second;

7. Perfection is unattainable;

8. The customer is always right, most of the time;

9. Define your brand;

10. Explore uncharted territory;

11. Beware the "us vs. them" environment;

12. Build a corporate comfort zone.

13. Not everyone is suited to be CEO;

14. Seek a second opinion. Seek a third;

15. Cut ties without burning bridges;

16. Pick up the phone;

17. Change shouldn't be feared, but it should be managed;

18. When it comes to making mistakes, bounce back, don’t fall down;

19. Be a leader, not a boss.

 


Via Peter Hoeve
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Three Management Gurus Explain Management

Three Management Gurus Explain Management | Business change | Scoop.it

A great post. I think a lot of manager should read and applied these advice. Unfortunately we live in a world where the human side is often forget, and the message in in this post is strong to change that situation. [note mg]

 

Michael Hammer in his book "Agenda" talks about modern managers driven by an economy that is more than ever controlled by the customer. "Managers are rediscovering that business is about execution."

 

He reminds us of the seriousness of watching the cash flow, fulfilling (rather than just getting) orders and the need to go beyond product ideas and focus more on product development.

 

The role of managers is to help their company "devise products and services that satisfy customers and then create and deliver them in a profitable way that satisfies shareholders"...

 

Read more: http://rictownsend.blogspot.com/2012/03/three-management-gurus-explain.html#comment-form


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