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Business Case Studies
The case studies available here are narratives that facilitate discussions about a particular business or management issue.
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KFC - Establishment of a Successful Global Business Model

KFC - Establishment of a Successful Global Business Model | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
By mid 1950s, fast food franchising was still in its infancy when Harland Sanders began his cross-country travels to market “Colonel Sanders’ Recipe
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The new KFC logo retained Colonel Sanders’ trademark bow tie; but, his classic white double-breasted suit was replaced by a red apron. This red apron represents the brand’s home style cooking tradition. It tells customers that the KFC 50 years ago where Colonel Sanders worked hard in providing fresh, delicious, high-quality food is still present today’s modern world.

 

60 years ago, KFC’s Colonel Sanders, founded what is now known as: “the family dinner alternative” — that is to provide complete meals for family time when unwilling or unable to prepare home cooked food. He also called it: “Sunday dinner seven days a week.” Today, the spirit and heritage of the Colonel has become a symbol of the Kentucky brand. The image of Colonel Sanders as the Kentucky Fried Chicken logo has become one of the best and most recognizable brands in the world.

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Apple iPod Silhouette Ad Campaign Case Study

Apple iPod Silhouette Ad Campaign Case Study | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
Despite critics who accused Apple of overusing the campaign, iPod Silhouette Ad Campaign dramatically helped iPod move to the forefront of the market for portable music.
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Apple, Inc. created a number of enduring cultural images with their Apple products and marketing through the years.  And perhaps none of these is more visually memorable than the “dancing silhouettes” of the 2003- 2008 iPod and iTunes advertising campaign. Initiated first with the iPod digital music player, the ads – which soon appeared globally in print, on TV and the web, and in various outdoor venues – proved to be one of the most effective marketing campaigns of the early 21st century. The dancing iPod silhouettes permeated the culture of their day and left their mark on the advertising industry as well.


The silhouette ads were particularly notable for the evocative effect they had on culture, fashion, and “hipness”– reaching Apple customers and well beyond.  The distinctive marketing art used in these ads also helped Apple to sell tens of millions of iPods and also billions of songs through Apple’s iTunes music store.  And this advertising, in some ways, helped Apple move its business to another level, sending it in into the superstar stratosphere of the world’s most elite and profitable companies.

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'Power of Dreams' Campaign by Honda Case Study

'Power of Dreams' Campaign by Honda Case Study | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
Honda considered ‘‘The Power of Dreams’’ campaign an advertising success. Worldwide sales of Honda vehicles rose dramatically from 2002 through 2005, from 2.6 million units per year to 3.2 million units per year.
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It's ironic that The Power of Dreams has become so iconic in contemporary advertising. W+K London partner Tony Davidson didn't even like the sound of that line when the agency first talked to Honda. "It is a literal translation from Japanese, so when you hear it as an English or American person, it sounds really cheesy," he says. "And I actually said, 'We're not going to work on this brand if we can't change the end line,' before we even worked for them."

 

Soichiro Honda, who founded the company in 1948, used his dreams and imagination to inspire his engineering work. Over the past 65 years, his dreams have been realised in the form of dozens of high-quality vehicles, all kinds of motorsport championships and a variety of prototypes for the future. "If you can make things, you can do amazing things. So that's what The Power of Dreams is: to have an idea that is beneficial to humanity and then to make it happen," explains Davidson.

 

These are some of the things that W+K distilled down into Honda's brand truths. The job of the advertising, W+K realised, was to convey these truths, and give meaning to The Power of Dreams, to consumers in the UK and later on across Europe.


Honda Grrr is one of the most awarded TV ads of all time

Its work began to appear in 2002. Davidson continues: "We did a press ad with a Daruma doll that explained what The Power of Dreams was. All of our ads from the start, even the very first stuff like the Honda perfume bottle with oil in it, or the banana with writing on it, or the Honda stamp for the Patent Office - they're all about having an idea and making it happen."

 

W+K had also started working on a television ad for Honda - introducing the new Accord. The lead creatives on the project were Ben Walker and Matt Gooden, now the creative heads at Crispin Porter + Bogusky in London. "The brief for Honda as a whole was to make engineering feel warm rather than Teutonic. 'Warm engineering' we called it," says Walker. "The brief for the Accord chopped and changed a lot, but in the end it was really about showing the car was brilliantly engineered. Nothing revolutionary, but we just had to put a 'warm' slant on that."

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The Magic of Ford

The Magic of Ford | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
In 1903, in a small wagon shop in Dearborn Michigan, a man by the name of Henry Ford started what is today the Ford Motor Company. It started it in 1896 when Henry Ford built his first car.
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Henry Ford’s Motor Company is one of America’s biggest prides in automotive industry. It is a multinational corporation and the world's fourth largest automaker based on worldwide vehicle sales, following Toyota, General Motors, and Volkswagen. The founder, Henry Ford incorporated the company on June 16, 1903. At 1980’s, under the leadership of his grandson Henry Ford II, several bad decisions had been made regarding the organizational structure for being an autocratic leader. Some internal problems were also contributing to the company’s loss in the business. Several times the company has experienced crisis to lose billions of dollars and faced a wide range of criticism for producing cars designed for yesterday’s consumer and poor quality. A phenomenon downturn happened at the early 1980’s to auto industry including Henry Ford’s Motor. The company encountered severe economic losses as a result of a reduction in market share, as well as the high costs incurred by labor contracts and the development of automobiles that met the new federal standards. In 1980, the company lost $1.54 billion, despite strong profits from the truck division and European operations. Ford lost a further $1.06 billion in 1981 and $658 million in 1982 while trying to affect a recovery; its market share fell from 3.6 percent in 1978 to 16.6 percent in 1981.

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Information System in Restaurant - MIS Case Study

Information System in Restaurant - MIS Case Study | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
Case Summary:
A waiter takes an order at a table, and then enters it online via one of the six terminals located in the restaurant dining room.
Abey Francis's insight:

Restaurants are built of complex systems for buying, storing, preparing and selling food. The well-being of a restaurant depends on its management information systems, which coordinate everything from scheduling personnel to customer service. Restaurant management systems can help to create an ambiance. Restaurant management information systems should make a restaurant more profitable as well as a better place for customers to eat.

The manager must be able to determine prices and schedules, make forecasts, perform an ongoing audit of inventory and other company assets, and monitor performance. More and more managers are turning to the computer to provide this information on a timely basis.

 

The restaurant uses an information system that takes customer orders, sends the orders to the kitchen, monitors goods sold and inventory, and generates reports for management.

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"Express Yourself" Ad Campaign by Bharti AirTel

"Express Yourself" Ad Campaign by Bharti AirTel | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
Bharti-Airtel Groups, with a customer base of more than 121million subscriber, form the largest cellular service provider of India.
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In 2003 Airtel launched its new brand campaign ‘Express Yourself’. The ‘express yourself’ ad conveys strong messages to the audience without really talking to them. Just by using simple words and effective visuals they have efficiently managed to deliver their message to their audience which is to ‘express themselves’. 

 

Airtel positions itself as a brand that connects people with their loved ones. It doesn’t just stick to targeting the urban population but also focuses on the rural population, since it believes that it’s not just the urban but also the rural population that wants to keep in touch with their loved ones. This feeling of staying connected is universal as is their motive to help people attain it. Airtel, like most other telecommunications brands (for example, Vodafone and Idea), does not use humour in its ads. Instead it tries to connect with its audience through deeper emotions, emotions involved in relationships between a parent and a child, a couple and also between friends.

 

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The Marketing of an Idea Project - Apple's IPod

The Marketing of an Idea Project - Apple's IPod | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
Apple’s iPod has taken the world by storm. Nearly ubiquitous, it has changed not only the way people listen to music, but it has transformed its parent company Apple into an entertainment giant.
Abey Francis's insight:

October 23rd 2001 – a day that revolutionized the digital music world, Apple Computer now known as Apple Inc. released their first MP3 Player, the iPod. So what exactly did Apple do with the iPod that was so revolutionary? Well, the marketing techniques and tactics they used are what made it so successful. “While everyone else was making an MP3 player that was better/cheaper/faster, Apple was making electronic jewelry that also played MP3’s. Never focusing on price, they brought to market more value, more style, and new ways of interacting with digital media.” says David Taber a marketing consultant who then goes on to explain that strategy really does matter. Apple knew what they were doing when they designed the iPod; they made it work better on the Mac than on a PC for obvious reasons – to get people to buy more Apple computers, both iPod and Mac sales benefited from this strategy.

 

Apple did not stop there, they continued to be that much better, they used better hardware, software, packaging, and marketing techniques than anyone else. The iPod was also more durable than its competing products due to Apple’s use of better parts which, in return made it more reliable.

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Walt Disney's Business Strategies Case Study

Walt Disney's Business Strategies Case Study | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
Walt Disney Company is a $27 billion a year Global Entertainment giant which is an American based company was started by Walter Disney in venture with his brother named Roy O Disney in 1923.
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Walt Disney recognizes what is customer value in Disney brand. They value a fun experience and homespun entertainment based on old-fashioned family values. Disney responds to these consumer preferences by leveraging the brand across different consumer markets. Let’s say that an American family goes to see a Disney movie together. They have a great time. They want to continue the experience. So Walt Disney offers Disney’s consumer products with multiple product lines aimed at specific age groups.

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Corporate Governance Case Study - Satyam Scam

Corporate Governance Case Study - Satyam Scam | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
Satyam Computers services limited was a consulting and an Information Technology (IT) services company founded by Mr. Ramalingam Raju in 1988.
Abey Francis's insight:

The Satyam scandal highlights the importance of securities laws and corporate governance in emerging markets. Mounting evidence suggests that weak corporate governance slows economic development. The Satyam scandal provides insight into the problems that emerging markets face when they transition from locally controlled corporations to globally traded corporations. There is a broad consensus that emerging market countries must strive to create a regulatory environment in their securities markets that fosters effective corporate governance. India has managed its transition into a global economy well, and although it suffers from corporate governance issues, it is not alone as both developed countries and emerging countries experience accounting and corporate governance scandals.

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Customer Relationship Management (CRM) in Banking - ICICI Bank

Customer Relationship Management (CRM) in Banking - ICICI Bank | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
Focus on ICICI Bank’s Initiatives The use of Customer Relationship Management (CRM) in banking has gained importance with the aggressive strategies for customer acquisition and retention being empl...
Abey Francis's insight:

Customer Relationship Management (CRM) in the Indian banking system is fundamental to building a customer-centric organization. CRM systems link customer data into a single and logical customer repository. CRM in banking is a key element that allows a bank to develop its customer base and sales capacity. The goal of CRM is to manage all aspects of customer interactions in a manner that enables banks to maximize profitability from every customer. Increasing competition, deregulation, and the internet have all contributed to the increase in customer power. Customers, faced with an increasing array of banking products and services, are expecting more from banks in terms of customized offerings, attractive returns, ease of access, and transparency in dealings. Retaining customers is a major concern for banking institutions which underscores the importance of CRM. Banks can turn customer relationship into a key competitive advantage through strategic development across a broad spectrum. This case study examines how CRM change the business of ICICI Bank, one of the nations leading private bankers.

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Kodak's Transition to Digital

Kodak's Transition to Digital | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
Kodak is one of the oldest companies on the photography market, established more than 100 years ago. This was the iconic, American organization, always on the position of the leader. Its cameras an...
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Kodak is an American multinational imaging and photography equipment company. You probably best identify them with their disposable cameras and photo developing locations, which have today greatly fallen out of use. With the rise of photographic technology in nearly every device, companies like Kodak have suffered. 

 

Kodak was taken by surprise by the speed of the shift to digital, which harms its business in two ways: digital cameras do not require film; and many users do not want the pictures they take transferred to paper, preferring instead to keep them stored on their computers.

 

With barriers to entry lower than film photography, the digital-camera industry is getting crowded. Sony has effortlessly made the transition from video technology to still digital photography. And now computer-makers, such as Hewlett-Packard, are muscling into the market. The latest upstarts are the mobile-phone manufacturers. Mobile handsets that can take pictures are expected to outsell both film and digital cameras.

 

Even if Kodak manages to carve itself a place in the digital-camera world, it may well find that its new competitors bring the razor-thin margins of the computer and consumer-electronics industries with them.

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Daewoo and the Asian Financial Crisis

Daewoo and the Asian Financial Crisis | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
In 1999, Daewoo Group Korea’s second largest chaebol, or family-owned conglomerate, collapse under $57 billion in debt and was forced to split into independent companies. The Asian financial crisis...
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The case examines the problems faced by South Korea-based Daewoo Motors, the flagship company of the Daewoo Group. Daewoo Motors expanded rapidly in several risky and uncertain markets by taking huge debts. The company offered its products at low prices and with huge discounts, thus further increasing its losses. The case also discusses how financial mismanagement by Daewoo's promoters and the Southeast Asian Financial Crisis in 1997-98 ultimately led to the company's bankruptcy. In early 2000, the South Korean government invited bids for the sale of Daewoo Motors. After two years of negotiations, Daewoo Motors was finally acquired by the US automaker General Motors.

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Training and Development in Nestle

Training and Development in Nestle | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
Introduction Nestlé is today the world’s leading food company, with a 135-year history and operations in virtually every country in the world. Nestlé’s principal assets are not office buildings, fa...
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How does a company like Nestlé – the world’s largest food and beverage business with around 250,000 people employed in some 500 factories and offices across the globe – provide the targeted, consistent and continuous training and development needed to ensure that it maintains its market position globally, and continues to move forward? The challenge for human-resource specialists in such an organization is not only in the geographically dispersed nature of the workforce, but also their different languages and cultures and, on an individual level, widely differing learning needs and styles.

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Apple iMac Ad Campaign Case Study

Apple iMac Ad Campaign Case Study | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
Apple’s share of the worldwide desktop-computer market had plummeted since 1995. Hoping that its stylish new iMac would propel Apple back into this vast segment of the market, Apple released its iMac ad campaign.
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The iMac ad campaign consists of a series of seven television commercials. These commercials advance Apple Computers newest generation of personal computers: the iMac. The iMac is a personal computer that is an AIO unit (All In One) and is housed in a translucent white and green case. Apple has attempted to make a simple, cheap, powerful, and easily connectable computer for people of all ages. 

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Apple Switch Ad Campaign Case Study

Apple Switch Ad Campaign Case Study | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
Apple Switch Ad Campaign created as a tribute to the innovating minds that truly changed the world by thinking in ways others never did.
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Switch was an advertising campaign launched by Apple Computer, Inc. on June 10, 2002. It featured what the company referred to as "real people" who had "switched" from the Microsoft Windows platform to the Mac. An international television and print ad campaign directed users to a website where various "myths" about the Mac platform were "dispelled". The television commercials were directed by Errol Morris.

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Al Dunlap at Sunbeam - Business Ethics Case Study

Al Dunlap at Sunbeam - Business Ethics Case Study | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
CEO Al Dunlap at Sunbeam, nicknamed “Chainsaw Al”, was fired almost two years later when the company's financial performance and stock price began to decline.
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Strategy is a creation of a unique and valuable position that rests on unique activities. Strategy requires creation of a position that cannot be imitated without significant trade-offs. So what is Dunlap’s strategy? Has Dunlap created such a position? If strategy rests on activities, looking at Dunlap’s activities which involve aggressive cost cutting through plant closures and lay-offs, sale of non-core business units and a flurry of new product introductions don’t seem to create a unique position that cannot be imitated by competitors or a strategy that leads to sustainable competitive advantage. But this chain of activities seems to drive an organization to its productivity frontier by improving operational effectiveness.

 Dunlap seems to adopt the same chain of activities (or strategy) in most of the organizations. But strategy is not a universal recipe. It’s more contingent based on many situational factors. But it might be possible to adopt operational effectiveness similarly in many organizations. To improve operational effectiveness one simply has to look at areas to save cost, reduce waste and improve resource utilization and drive the team to achieve improvements. So is Dunlap simply a great operational effectiveness improver?

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Corporate Restructuring By Procter & Gamble (P&G)

Corporate Restructuring By Procter & Gamble (P&G) | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
This case analyses six-year long organizational restructuring exercise conducted by Procter & Gamble (P&G), global leader in the fast moving consumer goods industry.
Abey Francis's insight:

Alan G. Lafley has brought P&G out of a difficult period of declining sales and dropping share prices into a promising new beginning. Revitalized brands like Pampers, Tide, Crest, and Folgers; “new and improved” versions of familiar products like Bounty and Downy; marketing innovations; and acquisitions like the Clairol hair-care line and the powered-toothbrush start-up called SpinBrush are among the ways in which Lafley is helping bring in more revenue—enough to push sales past $40 billion and beat Wall Street’s expectations for eight financial quarters in a row. The company has also cut costs, shortened the time it takes to roll out new products, and entered partnerships and licensing agreements with other firms to pave its way into the market for upscale cosmetics and perfumes.

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Vodafone's Re-Branding Strategies in India

Vodafone's Re-Branding Strategies in India | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
Launch of Vodafone Essar
Vodafone is the world’s leading international mobile communications company. It presently has operations in 25 countries across 5 continents and 40 partner networks with over 200 million customers worldwide.
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Vodafone’s new advertising campaign in India carried on with the same popular pug that has become a brand ambassador for Hutch. ‘Where ever you go, our network follows,’ was the previous slogan with the pug following the child wherever he goes. Now, with Hutchison Essar becoming part of the Vodafone Group, the new campaign had started with Vodafone Essar earmarking Rs. 2.5 billion on the transition from Hutch to Vodafone. The main message of the brand transition exercise: The new Vodafone is the same old Hutch. In the advertisement, the pug sees a new home when it returns after an outing and feels the change is better. The new catch phrase will be ‘Make the most of now.’

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"Think Different" Strategy of Apple

"Think Different" Strategy of Apple | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak founded Apple on April 1, 1976.  The two Steves, Jobs and Woz (as he is commonly referred to – see woz.org), have personalities that persist throughout Apple’s products, even today.  Jobs was the consummate salesperson...
Abey Francis's insight:

Apple has earned the reputation as one of the most creative, forward-thinking and successful companies in the world. They are admired by both their competitors and the public. Their success has been based on their unparalleled innovation; creating products for their fiercely loyal customers who expect Apple to anticipate the market and anticipate their needs. 


Their strategy to be the market innovator they have become didn’t come easily. Despite a strong brand, high profits and impressive growth back in the 1980’s, Apple almost went bankrupt in 1996. Jobs came back on board and by the 2010, its market cap had hit $220B. Jobs defined Apple as the hip and cool alternative to the other “boring” computer companies. They used the “Think Different” campaign strategy and positioned their products as the “greenest lineup of notebooks” available. 


This strategy of differentiating themselves as different has served them well. Their target consumers are small/medium-sized business, students, home users, younger generation and creative/graphics users. They call their consumers “Mac users” and it has become a cool “club” to join.

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An Apple for Your Enterprise

An Apple for Your Enterprise | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
Apple Macs have made their way out of the art department and into the offices of accountants, salespeople, manufacturing planners and top executives.
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Apple is, without a doubt, one of the single most powerful driving forces in the world of technology. That being the case, why is its inroad to the enterprise such a long, uphill climb? How could it be that such a well-oiled machine like the Mac would have problems gaining acceptance into the larger world of business? Macs are reliable, have the security and stability of a UNIX-based core, and the integration between software and hardware cannot be bested.

 

Macs tend to be relegated to the graphically-inclined departments and multi-media tasks. You won't walk into an enterprise-level company to see a farm of iMacs and Macbooks on desks. There are reasons for that.

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Consumer Behaviour Case Study - Gillette

Consumer Behaviour Case Study - Gillette | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
When most people hear “GILLETTE”, one thing comes to mind—Razors. That’s to be expected, since safety razors were invented by King C. Gillette in 1903, and the product in various forms has been the core of the company’s business ever since.
Abey Francis's insight:

One Gillette success, Right Guard Deodorant, was market leader in the 1960’s. Right Guard was one of the first Aerosols, and it became a family product which was used both by men and women. However, the product has not changed although the deodorant market has become fragmented with the introduction of antiperspirants, various product forms and applicators, and many different scents. As a result, Gillette slipped to third position in deodorant sales behind P & G and Colgate—Palmolive.


An even more embarrassing situation is Gillette’s foamy shaving cream, a natural fit with the razor business. S. C Johnson and Sons Edge Gel have supplanted that brand as the leading seller. These experiences created frustration at Gillette. Despite its preeminence in razors and blades, the company has been unable to sustain a leading position across the full range of toiletries.

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Strategies of Barista, Cafe Coffee Day and Qwiky’s in Indian Market

Strategies of Barista, Cafe Coffee Day and Qwiky’s in Indian Market | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
Strategies adopted by Barista: Barista established in 2000 in New Delhi was the largest and fastest growing coffee chain in India. Barista positioned itself as a lifestyle brand with Italian neighb...
Abey Francis's insight:

After a long tiring day, a cup of coffee can mean many things. Along with bringing back the lost energy, a cup of coffee can also cheer up the mood, bring people closer to each other and many more. These might be the reasons; the coffee shops are increasing in India.

 

India has been the best quality tea and coffee producer in the world and the Indian government has been earning hefty revenues from the tea and coffee exports. But, over the last few years, ‘The Indian Ready-to-Drink’ (RTD) has seen a praiseworthy growth. Reports say that the Indian market has already touched the 1,000 crore mark and in the coming years, the market is expected to reach 2,250 crore mark.

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Training and Development in Dell

Training and Development in Dell | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
Michael Dell, the CEO of Dell Computer Corporation, in a recent annual report, summarized where the CEO stands on the role that learning plays in his company. He said it was people who produced res...
Abey Francis's insight:

The success of Dell Computer, especially in the last decade, has been widely chronicled. The company designs and engineers a broad array of computer system products, including desktop and notebook computers, servers and storage products, workstations, software, and peripherals. Dell's customers range from large corporate accounts and government institutions, which account for two-thirds of company sales, to smaller companies and home-office and individual users.

 

Although training had always been a part of Dell's strategy, by 1995 it was clear that it needed an even greater emphasis. So, the office of the chairman directed that the role of Dell Learning be significantly expanded. The charter of the (then) corporate university was simple but challenging: ensuring that people had the knowledge and skills to keep pace with the firm's hyper growth. Apropos of that is an article in the Wall Street Journal, "Dell or Be Delled," in which "being Delled" was described as having your business taken away by someone who leaps ahead of you and changes the rules of your business. Dell understood that threat and realized its success would depend on how fast it could learn what's next and apply that to serving customers.

 

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Success Story of Pfizer Inc

Success Story of Pfizer Inc | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
Pfizer was founded in 1849 in Brooklyn, New York. It started as a company that focused primarily on human health services and products. Now it focuses on three major segments of the health care ind...
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Pfizer Inc. (formerly Warner Lambert & Pfizer Inc.) is a research-based, global pharmaceutical company, discovering and developing innovative, value-added products that improve the quality of life of people around the world and help them enjoy longer, healthier, and more productive lives. The company has three business segments: health care, animal health and consumer health care. Pfizer products are available in more than 150 countries.

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Case Study of PanAmSat

Case Study of PanAmSat | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
A Galaxy 4 satellite operated by PanAmSat, a subsidiary of Hughes Electronics, tilted away from the earth at 6:13 P.M. on May 19, 1998 and began to spin because of a computer failure and the subseq...
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On May 19, the Galaxy IV satellite lost both its primary and backup systems for keeping the craft pointed at its controllers. Failure of the satellite brought havoc to pager services for a week and severed links used by television and radio broadcasters.

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Triumvirate Leadership at Google

Triumvirate Leadership at Google | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
This case focuses on the managerial and leadership philosophies, policies and behaviors of the leadership triumvirate at Google. Sergey Brin and Larry Page, the founders of Google, along with Eric ...
Abey Francis's insight:

Historically, triumvirates have failed because they were formed to avoid wars of succession, with each player retaining the ambition to become Numero Uno. Most triumvirates set up in modern companies as a result of mergers or acquisitions have suffered the same fate. Google's triumvirate management structure has succeeded so far for these uncommon reasons:

 

Qualified leadership:  All three leaders at Google are qualified to act as top executives. Page and Brin are the company's founders; Schmidt has directed other large companies.

 

Mutual respect: Eric Schmidt never misses a chance to say how impressed he is by the intelligence of his two younger colleagues.

 

Shared values: All three leaders of Google are engineers by training. All appreciate the rigor of mathematical reasoning, have confidence in technology, and share the same view of money: They have no problem with making a lot of it, but doing so is not an obsession.

 

Different perspectives: Each leader has a different perspective. Schmidt is focused on administration; Page pays close attention to the company's social structure; and Brin is in charge of ethical matters. Schmidt is the one who generally speaks to financial analysts, whereas Brin was the spokesperson when it came time to rethink the conditions of entry into the Chinese market.

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