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8 Mistakes Our Brains Make Every Day And How To Prevent Them

8 Mistakes Our Brains Make Every Day And How To Prevent Them | Interesting | Scoop.it
Get ready to have your mind blown.
I was...

Via Albert Mastromartino
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Rescooped by Kristy Schofield from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
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7 Things You Need to Be More Magnetic

7 Things You Need to Be More Magnetic | Interesting | Scoop.it

Via The Learning Factor
Kristy Schofield's insight:

I believe this- especially with curiosity 

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The Learning Factor's curator insight, September 26, 2013 7:36 PM

Think of the most engaging people you know. My guess is they're charming, interesting, and make you feel special.

We all want to be perceived that way, don't we? Here are several character traits you should work on if you want to be magnetic and likeable.

Curiousity


By nature children are curious, but we lose much of our inquisitiveness as we age. Yet it's such a vital trait, especially in business. Curiousity drives you to continuously learn about your industry, understand your customers, and create innovative products.

donhornsby's curator insight, September 30, 2013 9:00 AM

My favorite people are direct and not afraid to share things about themselves that might even make them look bad. In doing so they convey a sense of humility, honesty, and vulnerability that work to lower people's defenses. If you can do that, you're well on your way to engaging with them.

Rescooped by Kristy Schofield from Tracking the Future
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3D Printing Aims to Deliver Organs on Demand

3D Printing Aims to Deliver Organs on Demand | Interesting | Scoop.it

Dying patients could someday receive a 3D-printed organ made from their own cells rather than wait on long lists for the short supply of organ transplants. Such a futuristic dream remains far from reality, but university labs and private companies have already taken the first careful steps by using 3D-printing technology to build tiny chunks of organs.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
Kristy Schofield's insight:

so strange!

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Robert Sales's comment, September 27, 2013 2:21 PM
Ok that is weird, and why would you want a printed organ? I realize that people could get desperate if they really need an organ but having one just because you would like a new organ is sick. The article talked about make skin and that is even weirder. Even though this technological break though could be great for the medical world it is still gross.
Joshua Zemanek's curator insight, October 2, 2013 12:07 PM

After reading this article, I thought that creating organs instead of taking them from donors would be so much more efficient in the world today. The only problem is that we are very far from doing so. However, we already have people creating the first steps to creating functioning artificial organs. This would very efficient and helpful for people with major health problems. The furthest they've made it was by building tiny chunks of organs, but that's still revolutionary. My connection to the U.S. is that with the number of accidents in our country, this could help with a ton of medical problems people experience.

Saghit Rethmeier's comment, October 4, 2013 9:29 AM
This is amazing, Its crazy that out techonology is advanced enough to be able to do this. Im interested to see how far it will be taken and what possibilitites there are in the future.
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The 10 worst toxins hidden in vitamins, supplements and health foods

The 10 worst toxins hidden in vitamins, supplements and health foods | Interesting | Scoop.it
by Mike Adams - Naturalnews.com I'm absolutely shocked at how many people don't investigate what's really in the products they swallow. When something is sold as an herb, vitamin, superfood or supplement, they think it's automatically safe.
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The Biggest Scam in Online Fashion

The Biggest Scam in Online Fashion | Interesting | Scoop.it

It's been a great year for JustFab.com--the "subscription" shoe website just pulled in a $40 million investment, bringing their total VC backing to $149 million. The service boasts millions of users...


When you go to JustFab.com, there's no hint about how the site really hauls in its money. It just looks like any other shoe store—think Zappos, with a drunk 10th grader sloshing some pink paint around. Beneath the mall-chic facade is the "JustFab VIP Membership Program," a near-compulsory subscription shoppers are pushed into joining upon checkout.


The pitch: you can get a pair of high quality boots for just $40!


The reality: you'll be charged $40 every subsequent month whether you want more boots or not.


This fact is presented to you in the most obscured—you might say deliberately!—manner. The VIP Membership isn't mentioned on the front page, it's not mentioned during sign-up, it's not mentioned when you take a "style quiz"—only when you hit checkout do you have a (slight) chance to read the very fine print....


Via Jeff Domansky
Kristy Schofield's insight:

Brutal

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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, September 28, 2013 12:22 PM

Big online fashion retailer gets $40 million in new funding and a huge PR headache. Can you say transparency?

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Mind Wandering: A New Personal Intelligence Perspective | Beautiful Minds, Scientific American Blog Network

Mind Wandering: A New Personal Intelligence Perspective | Beautiful Minds, Scientific American Blog Network | Interesting | Scoop.it
Once accused of being absent-minded, the founder of American Psychology, William James, quipped that he was really just present-minded to his own thoughts.
Most recent studies depict ...

Via Howard Rheingold
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Howard Rheingold's curator insight, September 26, 2013 1:29 PM

Most of the talk about attention and media has been about the deleterious effects of distraction; most certainly, there are many instances in which this is the case (in particular, the horror of texting while driving). Much of this discussion and general discourse has looked at the wandering mind as a distraction from focal awareness, a perhaps pleasurable but inevitably counter-productive foible. The author of this literature review in the Scientific American blog takes exception. It depends on context. Indeed, mind-wandering may be essential.