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5 Cloud Computing Predictions for 2016 - The MSP Hub

5 Cloud Computing Predictions for 2016 - The MSP Hub | Business | Scoop.it
By Bernard Golden The salty tang in the air is the fragrance of a sea change in IT – a tidal shift that will change the role of IT and IT participants over the next five years. I believe that 2016 will go down as the year in which the future of IT appears out …
Chris Crafford's insight:

Bernard hits the nail squarely on the head with this excellent "state of the cloud and where it is headed" post. This year will see significant shifts in cloud adoption by enterprises. More and more large corporations are either moving existing apps to public cloud ( where it can be done relatively easily) or building their next generation apps using CNA architectures. We will see a model of corporations using multiple clouds for different purposes become the norm.  


Those that have invested in internal private clouds will complement them with public clouds to meet growth, agility and financial demands. We can expect to see hybrid clouds, a brining together of legacy data centers, private clouds and multiple public clouds into the new "corporate compute platform".  Companies will use the cloud that is the best mix of performance, cost, security and ease of use for a given business need, and hence end up with a blend of different clouds in their purview. 


This will lead to the need for a common cloud management platform with tools and services that all the business need to make optimal use of this new environment, be able to manage their applications wherever they are running, rapidly deploy new microservices wherever they are best run, while meeting security and compliance requirements.


For this all to work they will also need to transform the internal culture to an agile and fast paced DevOps culture that optimizes the overall end to end flow of service delivery to customers.


The future is very different with  a focus on application creation, delivery and support at the speed needed by the business.  The underlying infrastructure has been commoditized and for most business there is not competitive advantage to running your own hardware, networks and support organization. Focusing their resources on building the best services to meet customer demand as fast as they can, and managing those applications and services is the new mission.


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How To Complete Online Job Applications Without Revealing Your Salary

How To Complete Online Job Applications Without Revealing Your Salary | Business | Scoop.it
How can you keep your confidential salary history private when the automated application sites require you to put a number in each little box? Liz Ryan explains how!
Chris Crafford's insight:

Liz makes some interesting points. I totally agree the education system and society in a broader sense does not prepare people to work for themselves. They do not get taught most of the skills they will need to make it on their own. Many come out of school barely able to communicate clearly (written or spoken), have enough self confidence or the social skills to build the relationships you need. The millennials have some additional challenges that are being documented in many places, but the need for constant hand holding and direction giving does not help them very much at all.


As someone that has started my own successful business,  been in 5 start-ups, and worked in big corporations I have worked with a broad spectrum of people.  The statement by Liz "Every person I know has the talent and pluck to make it as an entrepreneur" is interesting, she must have a very special and select group of people she knows.


I think this is a very flawed view of the real world.


Quite frankly there are many people out there that would starve if they had to try and make it on their own. They simply do not have the genetic and personal make up to succeed as an independent entrepreneurial person. Just looking at the team I work with currently, I can think of at least 2 folks, out of 12, do not have the personal drive, initiative, basic communication skills and "get things done" ability or attitude, and at least 2 more that would rather be playing games all day than actually work for a living. 


Not everybody has the personal tools, drive or desire to be out there on their own.


However, here is the really big challenge we are facing going forward. Just this past week I saw a forecast that 40% of US "working adults" will be freelancers by 2020! To succeed in the US and many other economies in the future most people are going to have to be freelancers/contractors. That is the way we will deliver services and products and earn an income.


We really need to change how we prepare our children for the future workplace.  It will not be the large factory or corporation of the past century and the skills and capabilities that will be needed are very different to what the "production line" schools we have are providing to our future generations.


The schools can't fix the missing ingredients in someone's personality like passion and drive, but they can help develop many of the other critical skills to give those that are not born entrepreneurs a reasonable shot at success too. 




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The private cloud is for suckers

The private cloud is for suckers | Business | Scoop.it
Managers embrace private cloud solutions such as OpenStack because they keep IT in control, but are they simply old men shaking their fists at the public cloud?
Chris Crafford's insight:

The vCloud Air approach from VMware may be the path forward that gives developers the freedom and flexibility to write, test and deploy new code as fast as the want and need to, while allowing the IT and Operations teams to provide the range of capabilities and and services needed by the corporation. Moving to the Public cloud doe uno magically address issues around security and compliance. For I&O teams public cloud usually means a steep learning curve and new tools/runbooks etc. The vCloud Air approach allows the corporation to add Public Cloud into their infrastructure and with layer 2 network extension manage it like it is part of their in-house data center. It is a win win scenario for Devs and IT/Ops teams.  This approach also helps the teams that need to get closer and work together helping with the migration to a DevOps methodology for the corporation.

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Multitasking Can Damage Your Brain and Career, Studies Say

Multitasking Can Damage Your Brain and Career, Studies Say | Business | Scoop.it
Researchers found that people who are regularly bombarded with several streams of electronic information cannot pay attention, recall information or switch from one job to another as well as those who complete one task at a time.
Chris Crafford's insight:

I have believed for a long time that multitasking is a myth, and infant the one so called job skill that you least want in an employee.  There are so many job postings that list multitasking as a desirable skill.  Nonsense.  Give me people that start and finish each task one at a time.  Te research shows that the get work done faster and with MUCH higher quality.  This is also a core principle of LEAN and Kanban.  Do one task at a time.  In software development, research has shown a 1000 times reduction in new defects added by engineers working on one issue at a time versus those switching between 5 or 6 which is a common practice.  The same engineers also completed their assigned task roughly 3 times more quickly without working any harder or longer hours. 


As a leader route out the multitasking in your team(s).  It is hurting everybody in so many ways. Eliminating the multitasking will improve efficiency and quality of the work and people will be happier.  It is a win-win.

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Want Success? Hire People Smarter Than You - ValentineHR

Want Success? Hire People Smarter Than You - ValentineHR | Business | Scoop.it
Chris Crafford's insight:

Hiring the smartest people you can find has always been the best approach in my experience. I would rather have 3 of the best folks we can find and attract versus 4 or 5 average people. The smaller team of great folks will always outperform the larger average team. 


One caution I would add though, when you are looking for those great team members first determine that they are smart and can solve any challenge you put in front of them and confirm they WANT to LEARN. Then much more importantly determine if they fit into the team culture and that the new team will be a functional one. No matter how brilliant someone is, if they do not fit in, or believe the world revolves around them only you will fail eventually.


So hire the smartest people you can find, but only hire them if they fit. You can fix a lack of knowledge/experience, but you can't change someone's personality.

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Keeping Up with Apps #infographic

Keeping Up with Apps #infographic | Business | Scoop.it
With a steady stream of new devices, operating systems, languages, and tools, mobile development never slows down. Choosing the right Mobile Application Development Platform can make or break your development - meaning the difference between bringing a timely, successful product to market or getting scooped by competition while your developers fix broken code. With the mobile landscape changing so quickly, what trends and features should developers look for in a cross-platform development soluti
Chris Crafford's insight:

The mobile app development space is challenge as this infographic depicts very clearly.  While the recommendation to find a MADP that has common tools, all-in-one platform, portability and open standards looks like good advice, my experience tells my this is a recommendation to look for a product that is all things to all men.  


Such products usually fail.  


I would rather say these are good guidelines, but as a development team/organization you should prioritize these and also look at your market and what your users are demanding.  Pick your platform so that it allows you to deliver what the users are demanding the most effectively. If for example open standards do not matter to your target and current users, don't impede your team with a tool that makes life harder just to support open standards. 


Be smart, choose well.

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The Future of IT Infrastructure is Hybrid and On-Demand | LinkedIn

The Future of IT Infrastructure is Hybrid and On-Demand | LinkedIn | Business | Scoop.it
Chris Crafford's insight:

While this post may be selling the author's product, much of what he lays out is spot on.  At the end of the day you need to align your  technology delivery and core business needs.  Today a key capability most companies need is agility.  That translates into virtualized/cloud  models that can provision services needed by the business on demand, or pretty darn close to on demand.


You do not need to do it in a public cloud, but to get the financial benefits and gain optimal agility using a hybrid approach moving your services selectively to public cloud can get you on a path that allows risk containment, leveraging cloud for DR/BCP, and managing core security needs on critical data.  Quite frankly most of the major public cloud vendors  (AWS, Azure, IBM, etc)  are running their clouds in facilities that  are more secure, more resistant to outages, and can scale at levels that very few other businesses can.  This is their business.  They can't fail at it.


Give hybrid cloud a good look.  It may be ready for your business.

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How 3D Printing Will Impact Your Future

How 3D Printing Will Impact Your Future | Business | Scoop.it
Approximately 40 manufacturers sell the 3D-printers most commonly used in businesses, and over 200 startups are developing consumer-oriented machines.
Chris Crafford's insight:

Great quick review of the state of 3D-Printing.  The capabilities are evolving faster than most folks probably expected. Personally I can't wait to print my next phone on my 3D-printer, but that is probably still a few years out, but working circuit boards are already being printed.


The growth and scope of 3D-printing is breathtaking. As technologist we love to revel in the coolness of it all, but 3D-printing is gong to change the world in other ways too.  Besides making the "replicator" real to us, it is going to cause a titanic shift in raw material packing and delivery as consumers or local maker locations will need those raw materials to keep the printing going.  That will have a ripple effect on logistics, security and regulations.  


However, I think we will see an even bigger impact across manufacturing. With 3D-printing we are moving the potential to manufacture almost anything you want at home, or at a location near your home. The consequences on major economies that depend on manufacturing will potentially see a increasing erosion of revenue and work leading to social and economic challenges. The next 10 years are going to be tumultuous with advances in technologies like 3D-printing, robotics and Artificial Intelligence driving massive changes in how just about everything we do will change.


Welcome to the future!

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Are You Ready To Become Obsolete? What I've Learned About Continuous Reinvention. | LinkedIn

Are You Ready To Become Obsolete? What I've Learned About Continuous Reinvention. | LinkedIn | Business | Scoop.it
Chris Crafford's insight:

Josh is spot on with this great post. I have re-invented myself and career multiple times so far and I am sure I will again. Constant learning is key.  You need to develop a hunger to learn and as Josh says read as much and as widely as you can.  Spend more time on your core area of learning, but reading outside  that narrow focus area in adjacent and sometimes more disconnected areas can help too. Often ideas from a different discipline can be applied in your area with great results. I would also recommend finding a mentor that can guide, support and push you into the places you may find more uncomfortable, but where you need to go.


This is the new world of "liquid careers" where what you do today will most likely not be valuable or needed  in 3 to 5 years.  So besides becoming your own personal learning machine our education system has to change radically as well. Schools need to really be teaching us to LEARN, not to remember and regurgitate whatever material they are trying to teach.  Being able to remember some specific fact is most likely not much use when you are trying to solve a current real world business problem.  What you need to solve the problem is to "learn" and really understand the root cause(s) of the issue and then create solutions.


Read voraciously, find experts and mentors, take training classes,  learn whatever it takes to stay abreast and even a little ahead somedays.

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Vancouver Business Journal - Cloud computing becoming the new norm, despite concerns

Vancouver Business Journal - Cloud computing becoming the new norm, despite concerns | Business | Scoop.it
Growing number of businesses looking to the cloud for data storage solutions
Chris Crafford's insight:

Migration to the cloud is inevitable for many businesses today, and most in the long-term. However, migrations should be planned carefully, and cloud management tools should be used to ensure security and governance is maintained across the hybrid clouds that most companies will have initially, and pure cloud plays of the future.  


Ensuring that you can deploy your applications and services across multiple cloud vendors is also a key part of any cloud strategy.  Choosing one of the big vendors may seem safe, but  giants have fallen in the past as history has taught us, so don;t bet the farm on just one cloud vendor.


If you want to stay in business, be profitable and responsive to your customers needs, cloud is in your future.  Learn to embrace it, but protect yourself.

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Hybrid cloud: is it right for your business?

Hybrid cloud: is it right for your business? | Business | Scoop.it
Sarah Lahav, CEO of software firm SysAid Technologies, gives us the inside track on why the hybrid cloud model is proving increasingly popular in the enterprise.
Chris Crafford's insight:

In my experience if you have legacy applications you will most likely gain from using a hybrid cloud approach. Significant security and regulatory requirements will also drive use of hybrid cloud.


Some of the challenges that you need to address in moving to public cloud with legacy apps and significant compliance issues is that many legacy apps are not well suited to public cloud deployment (they simply were not designed for the ephemeral, stateless world of public cloud), and most of the compliance agencies have not kept pace with the rate of change in public cloud. Most agencies are still in the early stages of understanding the impact of cloud technologies and deployment on the regulations they manage, never mind dealing with fast paced change like the rise of Docker and application containers, more generally, that are changing the game again.


Migrating a legacy ERP or other complex systems is often not realistic, instead migrating from an in-house deployed application to a hosted SaaS service may be easier, faster, and lower cost.


For financial services, full migration to public cloud will take even longer, and use of hybrid cloud may be the long-term solution for many.  The overall risk profile of moving key data or services to public cloud may just be too high for some institutions, or more likely for the regulatory bodies they need to work with.


Pure public cloud is good for many new applications, startups and smaller businesses.  For larger corporations, and even smaller ones with significant legacy application investment hybrid clouds will be the best path forward. 

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The Clearest Trend in the American Workforce Is Not an Encouraging One

The Clearest Trend in the American Workforce Is Not an Encouraging One | Business | Scoop.it
It's been a while since I posted data on US employment trends, so here's a chart created with FRED's snazzy new graphing interface. It shows the employment rate (in other words, 100 - the standard ...
Chris Crafford's insight:

I agree with your observation that the overall decline in labor force participation is driven by the growth of automation and digital technologies. In the book, Lights in the Tunnel, this consequence is predicted and explained.  We are seeing the very early start of displaced workers who simply cannot find new work.  This segment of the population will steadily grow over the next decades, ultimately forcing some radical changes in how we work, get paid and live in society. When 25-35% of the population is essentially permanently unemployed we will need different models for how we live, and it can't be survival of the fittest, or good 'ol capitalism.  That will not be a fun place to live for the have physically weaker and financial have nots.  


The fundamental assumption that most politicians still believe that new technology will offer new employment opportunities is about to be debunked.  Much of the new technology that is headed out way over the next decade will permanently displace human labor with many displaced folks not able to find any meaningful alternative work, no matter what retraining we offer them.


The future is going to split into at least two very differing paths. The haves and have-nots.  The differences will be stark and if the haves don't find ways to keep the have-nots busy and distracted, the future may be disrupted in more less pleasant ways than we currently experience disruption.  It will potentially be messy and violent.

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Accelerated Development: Productive Developers are Smart and Lazy

Accelerated Development: Productive Developers are Smart and Lazy | Business | Scoop.it
Chris Crafford's insight:

Great post on good software development practices and what constitutes good coding habits.  The focus on making sure that the developer truly understand the problem/requirement and is solving the right problem is vital.


One approach I discovered a while back is to use the idea of using real world examples to describe the requirements.  The concept is quite simple.  When the problem owners needs to articulate the requirements, instead of writing a story or more traditional requirements specifications, the whole team works together to describe the real world outcomes the "solution" will produce for a range of real world input conditions.  If a good set of input conditions are considered and the real outcomes are documented you end up with an excellent description of the problem, and you also have defined the acceptance tests, which if scripted and automated can be the initial tests for the solution.  


This gives you a basis for doing "test driven development", and a living set of descriptions that the team maintains and updates as the development progresses.


Give it a try.  You will be surprised how much better the problem and solutions are understood and how much better the solutions are.

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'Not Everyone Is Cut Out For Self-Employment' - Another Business Lie

'Not Everyone Is Cut Out For Self-Employment' - Another Business Lie | Business | Scoop.it
Why do we say "Not everyone is cut out for entrepreneurism?" Liz Ryan explains.
Chris Crafford's insight:

Here is the right article I was responding to:

Liz makes some interesting points. I totally agree the education system and society in a broader sense does not prepare people to work for themselves. They do not get taught most of the skills they will need to make it on their own. Many come out of school barely able to communicate clearly (written or spoken), have enough self confidence or the social skills to build the relationships you need. The millennials have some additional challenges that are being documented in many places, but the need for constant hand holding and direction giving does not help them very much at all.


As someone that has started my own successful business,  been in 5 start-ups, and worked in big corporations I have worked with a broad spectrum of people.  The statement by Liz "Every person I know has the talent and pluck to make it as an entrepreneur" is interesting, she must have a very special and select group of people she knows.


I think this is a very flawed view of the real world.


Quite frankly there are many people out there that would starve if they had to try and make it on their own. They simply do not have the genetic and personal make up to succeed as an independent entrepreneurial person. Just looking at the team I work with currently, I can think of at least 2 folks, out of 12, do not have the personal drive, initiative, basic communication skills and "get things done" ability or attitude, and at least 2 more that would rather be playing games all day than actually work for a living. 


Not everybody has the personal tools, drive or desire to be out there on their own.


However, here is the really big challenge we are facing going forward. Just this past week I saw a forecast that 40% of US "working adults" will be freelancers by 2020! To succeed in the US and many other economies in the future most people are going to have to be freelancers/contractors. That is the way we will deliver services and products and earn an income.


We really need to change how we prepare our children for the future workplace.  It will not be the large factory or corporation of the past century and the skills and capabilities that will be needed are very different to what the "production line" schools we have are providing to our future generations.


The schools can't fix the missing ingredients in someone's personality like passion and drive, but they can help develop many of the other critical skills to give those that are not born entrepreneurs a reasonable shot at success too. 

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6 Characteristics to Screen for When Hiring Top Talent

6 Characteristics to Screen for When Hiring Top Talent | Business | Scoop.it
A startup’s first hires are crucial. These are the people who will lay the foundation for your company culture and take your business to the next level.
Chris Crafford's insight:

This list is presented in the context of startups, but I think it applies to any modern development or consulting team equally well, no matter how big or small the company is

.

Recruiting new members into a team is hard. Finding folks that can do and preferably exceed what is needed, fit sufficiently well with the team, and want to be in the team takes a lot of work.  Most hiring managers and teams are pretty good at assessing technical capabilities, but usually are weak at the what really matters: the skills listed in this post.


If a candidate is technically smart and anxious to learn, they will rapidly ramp up on just about any technology.  If they do not have the 6 characteristics listed here: desire to learn, thrive amidst ambiguity, passion, scrappiness & grit, excellent collaboration and willingness to put the company first, you will be hiring a management challenge, and more likely someone that will hurt the team, rather than help.


Take this list to heart, and start explicitly looking for these characteristics in your next candidate.

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Is cloud migration getting automated? | Rickscloud

Is cloud migration getting automated? | Rickscloud | Business | Scoop.it
For a majority of companies, from small and mid-sized businesses to large enterprises, migrating data center workloads to the cloud is rapidly becoming a key
Chris Crafford's insight:

Rick is correct that cloud application migration is becoming a major topic for many corporations. Deciding which applications to migrate and how to do that migration has multiple aspects. Business critical nature, need to scaling on demand, HA/DR capability,  application architecture and current operating platform are all important factors in the evaluation process. Once you have apps prioritized you are then faced with at least five choices on the migration: 1. Re-hosting on the target cloud, 2. Refactor the application as needed fo rthe new cloud, 3. Revise at least parts of the application to leverage cloud capabilities, 4.Rebuild it with Cloud friendly tools and services, 5. Replace with cloud based option.


If your current applications are running on VMware VMs the vCloud Air public cloud, configured in  a hybrid cloud connection with your existing data center can make a significant portion of the app migrations much faster and easier to achieve. Using a direct connect, or IPSEC VPN allows full security extension from your current environment, and the compatible operating environment means many apps can simply be shipped over and launched with some minor configuration changes. 


App migration to the cloud is a critical function most corporations will need to tackle sooner than later. Choosing a path that reduces the complexity and simplifies choices may be the right one for many.


(Note I am a VMware employee).

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Karōjisatsu - IT Revolution

Karōjisatsu - IT Revolution | Business | Scoop.it
Chris Crafford's insight:

Most of us are conditioned from a young age to work hard, compete and strive for success. That can come at a significant price, more so for some than others.


This post by John WIllis is one that you should read.  It is not easy to read, but the lessons are worth the energy, focus and time. 


It could save your life.

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AI Won't End the World, But It Might Take Your Job | WIRED

AI Won't End the World, But It Might Take Your Job | WIRED | Business | Scoop.it
Everyone is worrying about the AI apocalypse, but that's just a distraction from the real problem, says Baidu's chief scientist. We should be worried about our jobs.
Chris Crafford's insight:

I agree with Andrew Ng. AI is going to have massive impact on individuals in ways many don't see coming or are hiding their head in the sand so they can pretend it is not happening.


Whether there will be an apocalypse triggered by AI I cannot say, but something like that is about to hot employees in companies around the world. Advances in AI are broad reaching and systems with real cognitive ability have been built and are being extended right now. These systems can solve problems faster and more consistently than humans.


Just about any "office" work and significant levels of manual work will be automated over the next 10 to 15 years. Self driving vehicles is just one example of a technology that could easily eradicate the "driver" job function, be it truck driver, taxi cab or limo driver. 


The armies of administrative workers processing "paper work" will be disappear as AI systems rapidly replace them.


The big difference with this transformation is that unlike past "revolutions" where displaced workers can be retrained in new work, this will not be true this time, and the shear volume of unemployed will become the core issue society must deal with. Living with unemployment rates of 30% or more could become the norm and that will fundamentally challenge existing social structure, policies and practices.  


If governments don't prepare for this and society does not adapt in how it deals with this change, we could find ourselves in a new version of the "wild wild west", but this time it will be on a scale few can imagine.


The work of the future is in creating new things, solutions, services etc. Human creativity is the one thing AI cannot replicate yet.


In parallel we need to start rethinking what society is and how it works. The current system, at least the one in the USA will not do well in this future.

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How businesses will change in the age of full connectivity

How businesses will change in the age of full connectivity | Business | Scoop.it
Within the next few years, businesses and the lives of their employees will transform beyond many peoples’ imagination. As we enter an age of complete connectivity, high-speed mobile and cloud technology already enable flexible working from home and adapting people’s schedules to their needs. The question is how it will improve businesses’ productivity? Will it change the way companies operate?A new business worldAlready, companies are seeing the effects of new digital and social trends. New reg
Chris Crafford's insight:

Tobias is spot on in this post.  The emerging next generation of mobile communication, combined with Cloud and effect collaboration tools will change how we work, who we work for and where we work. 


The concurrent social changes we are seeing in the next generation workforce, the Millennials, will further push these changes into common practice.


We are on the cusp of a massive technological shift coinciding with a generational change that will radically change the very concept of employment, how and where we work, how much we get paid and what are considered valuable benefits.


Millennials are much less motivated by money and status symbols. The care about the quality of their lives, their free time and the challenges they need to solve in work. They are not interested in being cogs in a machine, they are fundamentally innovative and free agents.


Combining this shift in values and attitude to work and life with always on, high bandwidth wireless connectivity and a plethora of cloud based services and data it is not hard to see that we are headed to a whole new way of work and reward.


I have long suspected that we will migrate to a on-demand/contract based work relationship with employers.  I believe we are seeing the early stages of that emerging now and I would expect to see it accelerate as technology combined with the next generation workforce emerges over the next 5 years.


All I can say to the  the corporations is plan for this future, if you do not see this coming you will be run over by the ones that do.  Defining work, employment and benefits is about to be disrupted in ways you may not be ready for.

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Business Management: 6 Stern Truths You Need to Know Before Becoming an Entrepreneur

Business Management: 6 Stern Truths You Need to Know Before Becoming an Entrepreneur | Business | Scoop.it
Chris Crafford's insight:

This is a must read for any new entrepreneurs out there.  I have started my own business and been in 5 startups.  This is great advice and each point is spot on. Read, absorb and do.

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The 5 lessons both IT and business should learn from Apple

The 5 lessons both IT and business should learn from Apple | Business | Scoop.it
Tired of being ineffective and unloved? It's time to act different
Chris Crafford's insight:

Galen I agree with your analysis.  My post from a few days back echoed many of the same observations. I would add that it takes fortitude in the US quarterly driven market to take a long-term view and work on strategies that take years to execute.  


Lot's of companies espouse long-term strategies but at the first sign of missing their number for a quarter they make tactical short decisions and actions that scupper the strategy.


The quarterly reporting process, introduced to catch bad companies, addressed a fraud issue, it has, in my opinion, hurt many companies in the US, with the short term focus on making your numbers every quarter. A few companies, Apple being a prime example, have mastered the balancing act of hitting good quarterly results (mostly) while staying the course on their long-term goals and plans.


When I look at Microsoft that under Balmer was all about sucking profits out of a loyal and then captive base with no real product direction, they still appear to be divided in where they are going. They appear to be wanting to be a Cloud provide with Azure and Office 360 etc., but their Apple envy has them trying to become a hardware company with the Surface product line.  Yes, Apple has iCloud too, but the difference is iCloud is an enabler for their broader product vision of the aptly named "liquid computing", not a standalone product.  Microsoft wants to sell Cloud (Azure) and Surface as standalone products. The strategy and product vision is not clear.

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iOS 8's hidden revolution goes way beyond the iPad and iPhone

iOS 8's hidden revolution goes way beyond the iPad and iPhone | Business | Scoop.it
Handoff, Touch ID, extensions, HealthKit, CloudKit, and HomeKit are all part of a larger plan that moves liquid computing forward
Chris Crafford's insight:

Great article by Galen. While there are many critics of Apple, especially in recent months before the slew of announcements last week, they just keep delivering fundamental innovation that is really solid and well thought out.


Unfortunately "innovation" and "disruption" have become overhyped buzzwords, and many so-called innovations or disruptions are really not that important or significant. I would suggest the at what really has been disruptive about Apple is that is really has a very long-term thoroughly thought out strategy for products, markets, and the interplay between them. Infact I would suggest that none of the other "big" players in technology have anything remotely close to the long-term strategy that Apple uses as the basis for decision making and product innovation. I would put Microsoft, Google, Facebook and Twitter in that bucket. 


The second key differentiator that Apple has always had, and when coupled with a clear strategy is so successful is their maniacal focus of delivering easy to use ground breaking technology. Elegant and simple to use products that work together, each revision adding to and building on the previous version.  Yes they make mistakes, they are human after all. But for the past 10 years everybody else has pretty much been following, playing catch-up and plagiarizing what Apple did first, and most do not do it better, cheaper maybe, but not better.


Having a clear strategy and then executing it faithfully is still a great way to build a successful business.

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How your boss will run your life in a few years

How your boss will run your life in a few years | Business | Scoop.it
Want job security? Let your company monitor you 24/7.
Chris Crafford's insight:

The trend toward "portfolio career" is already happening today with many skilled professionals preferring to work on a contract basis. This gives them a lot more flexibility in the work they do, they can generally avoid to internal corporate complexities and politics, and do work they enjoy and are good at. Many corporations are seeing value in using a larger contract based employee base too. Besides getting highly skilled talent when they need it most, it gives them more cost control and a reduced responsibilities on healthcare insurance.


The idea that as a contractor you need to perform and have a high "rating" is a natural outcome of this approach, but it can work both ways.  Corporations will get rated too, and the more successful professionals will be able to be more selective about who they choose to work for.


Corporations may become more powerful and controlling than they are today, but to be successful they will always need creative talent.  Technology is making tremendous strides in artificial intelligence and automation of routine work, so a lot of today's white collar work will be automated, and workers will be displaced. However, the real value work comes from the creative recognition of solutions and opportunities, creating new things and ideas and that for now remains the domain of humans.

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Trained cloud computing professionals – augmented need

Trained cloud computing professionals – augmented need | Business | Scoop.it
Chris Crafford's insight:

As a consultant working with multiple clients migrating to DevOps and Big Data solutions (cloud based of course) the internal skills gap is a recurring theme.


When doing the analysis as to what factors may slow down projects and rollout of new applications using the new approaches a few common groups of issues pop up.


Contractual/compliance is a common issue that usually requires business decisions on risk to resolve.


The other common grouping is knowledge/skills across the teams that are doing the work and have to support the new processes and tools.  I see one of the biggest challenges is for most Operations (IT Level 1/2) teams where their old familiar world is ripped and replaced with ephemeral servers and restricted access, a bunch of new tools, and the need to learn scripting to get most useful work done. The work needed to help these teams transform requires a range of training, beyond new technology and gets into people and process skills too. The payoff of investing in these transitions is great, but be ready for a lot of hard work to get there.

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Three Trends That Will Make A Difference In Mobile Payments - TechCrunch

Three Trends That Will Make A Difference In Mobile Payments - TechCrunch | Business | Scoop.it

With the building curiosity on when Apple will announce the new iPhone and whatever else they have up their sleeve, this is a very timely discussion in my opinion. Given we agree that the three factors listed are going to drive mobile payments, who is better placed than Apple to drive the mobile payments train forward. They reportedly have more credit cards on file than anybody else, the  have been experimenting with practical usage mobile payment sin their stores for several years and have made multiple moves in the payments technology arena over the past few years. 


I would almost be surprised if there was not a big mobile payments initiative or program announced sometime in the next quarter by Apple, anchored around the new phones and iOS 8. Not long to go now.

TechCrunch Three Trends That Will Make A Difference In Mobile Payments TechCrunch Editor's note: Alberto Jimenez is director of mobile payments at IBM. Jimenez was most recently Director of Global Mobile Solutions at Citigroup.


Via Vaughn Clair, Fred Zimny
Chris Crafford's insight:

With the building curiosity on when Apple will announce the new iPhone and whatever else they have up their sleeve, this is a very timely discussion in my opinion. Given we agree that the three factors listed are going to drive mobile payments, who is better placed than Apple to drive the mobile payments train forward. They reportedly have more credit cards on file than anybody else, the  have been experimenting with practical usage mobile payment sin their stores for several years and have made multiple moves in the payments technology arena over the past few years. 


I would almost be surprised if there was not a big mobile payments initiative or program announced sometime in the next quarter by Apple, anchored around the new phones and iOS 8. Not long to go now.

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