Business as an Agent of World Benefit
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Business as an Agent of World Benefit
Sustainable design; green economy; csr; sustainable development; Business as an Agent of World Benefit; Appreciative Inquiry; David Cooperrider; CSR
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The Dutch Have Solutions to Rising Seas. The World Is Watching.

The Dutch Have Solutions to Rising Seas. The World Is Watching. | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
In the waterlogged Netherlands, climate change is considered neither a hypothetical nor a drag on the economy. Instead, it’s an opportunity.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Every global issue is an opportunity for despair or innovation. Take the Netherlands. Being largely under sea level in a world of rising seas is a reality. There is no room for denial and it is a force to big to fight off with big walls. The innovation? It is, in essence, to let water in, where possible, not hope to subdue Mother Nature: to live with the water, rather than struggle to defeat it. The Dutch devise lakes, garages, parks and plazas that are a boon to daily life but also double as enormous reservoirs for when the seas and rivers spill over. You may wish to pretend that rising seas are a hoax perpetrated by scientists and a gullible news media. Or you can build barriers galore. But in the end, neither will provide adequate defense, the Dutch say. And what holds true for managing climate change applies to the social fabric, too. Environmental and social resilience should go hand in hand, officials here believe, improving neighborhoods, spreading equity and taming water during catastrophes. Climate adaptation, if addressed head-on and properly, ought to yield a stronger, more inclusive and equitable, resilient, and richer nation.
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How Elon Musk Proved That Thought Leadership Is The New Patriotism

How Elon Musk Proved That Thought Leadership Is The New Patriotism | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Taking a stance is scary, that’s for sure. It’s hard to shake off that old idiom: “Don’t rock the boat.” But data shows that visionary, change-oriented leadership—often called “transformational leadership”—doesn’t just sound inspiring in bus-side advertisements, but it gets results.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
A few months ago, almost the minute Trump pulled the US out of the world's Paris agreements, Elon Musk tweeted that he himself would no longer participate on the President's business advisory council. But more than that, he tweeted that denying climate change is simply wrong. I spoke to Elon's employees soon after and it was clear that this leader spoke to their hearts, minds, and purposes. They were on fire. One associate in Amsterdam said "this is my job"--"my job is to electrify the renewable energy age." A new report from the global public relations firm Weber Shandwick and KRC Research surveyed Americans on how they feel about “CEO activism”. 56% of millennials said CEOs and other business leaders need to engage on hotly debated current issues more today than in the past, compared with just 36 percent of Gen Xers and 35 percent of baby boomers. 47% of millennials said CEOs have a responsibility to speak up on social issues that are important to society, compared with just 28 percent of Americans in older generations. And millennials were the only generation who view CEOs more favorably for taking public positions actually expanded since last year, rather than declined.

This article in Forbes speaks about how years ago this kind of stance--especially for an early stage startup company would be almost unheard of.  Taking a stance is scary, that’s for sure. It’s hard to shake off that old idiom: “Don’t rock the boat.” But data shows that visionary, change-oriented leadership—often called “transformational leadership”—doesn’t just sound inspiring in bus-side advertisements, but it gets results. A 2009 study from the Journal of Business Research found that transformational leadership increased employees’ creativity. These studies show visionary leadership increased job satisfaction, productivity, and organizational commitment among employees. Want more? A 2008 study from the Journal of Applied Psychology discovered that transformational leaders were more effective at getting their followers to commit to a particular change initiative, especially when the change had some sort of personal impact, than non-transformational leaders were. It turns out that passion is hard to fake. But when it is real, people will follow with zest and enthusiasm. Genuine thought leadership is not about branding - it’s about courage.
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Google’s Quest To Develop A Plant-Based “Power Dish” More Popular Than Meat

Google’s Quest To Develop A Plant-Based “Power Dish” More Popular Than Meat | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
In an attempt to reduce the company’s carbon footprint, Google is making changes to the food it serves its employees: everything from blending burgers with mushrooms to a data-driven quest to create the most delicious vegan taco.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
I loved it the last time I visited at the Google campus. Part of my visit--with Chade Meng Tan--was to see and understand all of the well-being and human flourishing initiatives, including wonderful hiking trails, life-planning, meditation, etc. This year, shares the Optimist Daily and Fast Company, the company will hit its goal of purchasing 100 percent renewable energy to run its operations--and people love this leadership. Google also recognizes that meat consumption is an important part of its carbon footprint. That’s why many attempts are made to bring down the meat consumption at the company’s headquarters in Sunnyvale. Google chefs are developing a plant-based “power dish” more popular than meat. The chefs aim that their efforts will ultimately serve not just Googlers but restaurants across the country. Their recipes will be available for anyone to use on World Resources Institute’s website in September. nWhen I was in their restaurants I was also inspired by how much design thinking goes into the conscious design of the interaction spaces, and how easy and attractive they make it to actually choose a more nutritarian (nutrient dense or high nutrients per calorie) diet. Imagine if we could take the best of the best at Google and connect and combine all that with the best of the best at Reebok ("be more human") and hundreds of other companies all pioneering with more positive organizing in their own ways! 
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Business Experiments Reinforce Benefits of a 100% Human Workplace 

Business Experiments Reinforce Benefits of a 100% Human Workplace  | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
A team of colleagues helping to take care of your baby is not a perk you find in most offices. At The Muse, however, it’s the norm. Recognizing the tough transition back from parental leave, the career guidance company launched a Bring Your Baby to Work program. Employees can bring their child into the office …
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Tiny interventions--from open hiring to energy bursts and cooperative childcare-- can bring about the more fully human organization. The experiments and initiatives explored in this collection give living proof to the idea that a 100% human workplace allows employees and, in turn, business to grow and succeed. The 100% Human Network’s continued experimentation furthers the future of work, where businesses prioritize people and community.
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Thinking (and feeling) like an Elon Musk

Thinking (and feeling) like an Elon Musk | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
In conversation with TED's Head Curator Chris Anderson, serial entrepreneur and future-builder Elon Musk discusses his new project digging tunnels under LA, the Hyperloop, Tesla, SpaceX and his dreams for what the world could look like.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Elon Musk says his goal--to accelerate the future of renewable energy--is not because he is trying to be a savior, but rather, when he looks into the future "I don't want to be sad." There is a heartsickness we all feel about what we are doing, and the antidote to even quiet despair is action, positive action. That's why people like Elon Musk come alive in entrepreneurship involving the greatest global challenges of our day, and turning them into business opportunities. Sustainable energy will happen no matter what, out of necessity, Musk says. “If you don’t have sustainable energy, you have unsustainable energy … "The fundamental value of a company like Tesla is the degree to which it accelerates the advent of sustainable energy faster than it would otherwise occur,” he says.
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Volvo Cars to go all electric

Volvo Cars to go all electric | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Volvo Cars, the premium car maker, has announced that every Volvo it launches from 2019 will have an electric motor, marking the historic end of cars that only have an internal combustion engine (ICE) and placing electrification at the core of its future business.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
As the movement to 100% renewable energy grows each day, the auto industry is seeing the future.  "Electric vehicles (EVs)" shares Peter Diamandis "are taking the transportation industry by storm." Within the next two decades, EVs will undoubtedly be the cheapest and most widely used vehicles on the market. Because EVs are inherently simpler devices, only possessing 10% of the moving parts of gas-powered engined vehicles, they're cheaper to build and cheaper to maintain. Volvo is an excellent case study to watch, as it's a traditional automotive player that acknowledges the coming changes in the auto industry, and is aggressively investing into an all-electric future
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Big business sees the promise of clean energy

Big business sees the promise of clean energy | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
PITY America’s big businesses. For years their efforts to reduce their carbon footprint were dismissed by environmentalists as “greenwashing”.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Why would more than 900 U.S. firms decry the exit from the Paris agreement? Executives fear the exit will do no good to America’s economy—and by implication their—business and brand success. Not for nothing have more than 900 American firms and investors, including Amazon, Twitter, Target and Nike, put their names to a “We are still in” open letter to the UN. Its signatories pledge to help reduce the country’s carbon emissions by 26% by 2025, in keeping with America’s Paris pledge. While it is true that the current U.S. federal government administration is not leading the effort to transform the world economy to a low-carbon, resilient, and sustainable future, the transition is now global, widely supported, morally compelling, innovation-inspired, increasingly cost-effective, and therefore irreversible.
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'A reckoning for our species': the philosopher prophet of the Anthropocene

'A reckoning for our species': the philosopher prophet of the Anthropocene | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
The long read: Timothy Morton wants humanity to give up some of its core beliefs, from the fantasy that we can control the planet to the notion that we are ‘above’ other beings. His ideas might sound weird, but they’re catching on
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Ecology without Nature. The author of this book has been called "the philosopher prophet of the Anthropocene. His name is Tim Morton and his ideas are catching on. Morton’s books are among the pre-eminent cultural works of our time. Morton’s terminology is “slowly infecting all the humanities”, says his friend and fellow thinker Graham Harman. Though many academics have a reputation for writing exclusively for their colleagues down the hall, Morton’s peculiar conceptual vocabulary – “dark ecology”, “the strange stranger”, “the mesh” – has been picked up by writers in a cornucopia of fields, from literature and epistemology to legal theory and religion. Last year, he was included in a much-discussed list of the 50 most influential living philosophers. His most frequently cited book, Ecology Without Nature, says we need to scrap the whole concept of “nature”. He argues, says this long article in The Guardian, that a distinctive feature of our world is the presence of ginormous things he calls “hyperobjects” – such as global warming or the internet – that we tend to think of as abstract ideas because we can’t get our heads around them, but that are nevertheless as real as hammers. He believes all beings are interdependent, and speculates that everything in the universe has a kind of consciousness, from algae and boulders to knives and forks.
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Oil has a Tesla problem. But when will it hit?

Oil has a Tesla problem. But when will it hit? | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it

It's undeniable that electric cars have serious momentum. The number of electric vehicles surpassed 2 million in 2016, according to a report from the International Energy Agency, published on Wednesday. And major auto makers like Volkswagen, Ford (F) and Honda have announced ambitious goals to sell more and more electric cars.

But how many people do you know who own an electric car? Probably not many.

Electric vehicles only represented 0.2% of total light-duty vehicles on the road in 2016, the IEA said

David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
When you think about it, this CNN report--and its headline-- is an extraordinary one. Electric vehicles represented only 0.2% of total of cars and light duty vehicles on the road in 2016. And yet analysts are, in a David and Goliath, way already saying TESLA poses a serious problem for the entire oil industry and companies such as Exxon are extrapolating the tiny signals and sensing huge shifts. Tesla (TSLA) literally can't make its Model 3 mass market car fast enough to meet the enormous demand for electric cars. The stunning rise of Tesla -- and growing popularity of electric vehicles broadly -- according to this report "poses a glaring problem for the oil industry." Its so fun to see the passion in the young TESA employees: I was just in Amsterdam where I've met with the young people working at TESLA. They are so on fire: their passion, inspiration, and high performance is definitely connected to their mission to transform the world. Imagine if every business leader could articulate a mighty purpose that captures the minds and hearts of their people, their partners, and their stakeholders. This is perhaps THE leadership task of today.   
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This Is the Biggest News in Electricity Since the Light Bulb -- Say Investment Experts

This Is the Biggest News in Electricity Since the Light Bulb -- Say Investment Experts | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
If the world can generate and store energy from the sun for less than the cost of fossil fuels, it literally changes everything about the energy industry.
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Moonshot thinking applied to earth thinking

Moonshot thinking applied to earth thinking | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
The world feels pretty broken right now. That’s why we need Fixers — bold problem solvers working toward a planet that doesn’t burn and a future that doesn’t suck. For our annual list of emerging green leaders, Grist bring
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
The innovation being unleashed by industry--on behalf of the whole planet--is unprecedented. Please meet the Grist "50"--bold innovators using business to address the UN goals. One of those young leaders to watch is Davida Herzl CEO of Aclima in Silicon Valley.  Leaders in Silicon Valley refer to the willingness to take on ambitious and seemingly impossible challenges as “moonshot thinking”, inspired by man’s first moon-landing within a decade of setting the goal. This kind of thinking has led to the Internet, driverless cars, and rockets that will eventually take us to Mars. Aclima is an  innovative company that applies “Earthshot thinking” to develop bold technologies that address the planetary scale challenge of global pollution and climate change. Earlier this month, they were invited to speak about Earthshot thinking at the United Nations event “Climate Change and the Sustainable Development Agenda”, where the focus was on solutions that serve our planet and people. Aclima's vision is nothing less than a Fitbit for the planet. Imagine the IoT, through trillions of tiny sensors in giving the vital signs of every ocean current, every city's air quality,and the quality signs of every bit of soil and and every waterway--making the invisible visible. I loved my meeting with Davida, at the Google Campus, and you could literally feel one awakening touching another. I loved the juxtaposition of Google's mindfulness and meditation classrooms located next to companies such as Aclima working on bringing us the signals of every vital sign related to earth systems. The global mind change Willis Harman predicted may be happening faster than we think.       
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Tesla is now bigger than Ford despite selling a fraction of the cars — and a threat is looming over the future

Tesla is now bigger than Ford despite selling a fraction of the cars — and a threat is looming over the future | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Tesla is having a big week.

The automaker is now bigger than Ford in market cap.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Tesla is now bigger than Ford in market cap. Tesla was even on the verge of surpassing GM in market cap on Tuesday. This is a big deal for a company that has sought to contend with fossil fuel car manufacturers. Not too long ago, many doubted Tesla could survive just producing electric vehicles. Fast forward to 2017 and Tesla is selling commercial batteries capable of storing solar, on a mass scale, and is wanting to create a solar energy revolution by uniting zero emissions cars and homes with renewables—that is, cars and homes running on sunshine. But the real story here is how much management skill “doing good and doing well” actually takes. Sustainable value creation is innovation’s new frontier, but it takes management skill, boldness, and tremendous business vision. So often we focus on the “doing good” part of the equation, and gloss over the management acumen. There is so much to learn. "We were in production hell," Musk said during the company's second-quarter earnings call. "We climbed out of hell in June." But Musk is preparing accordingly to ensure the Model 3 launch goes off without any hiccups. In November, Tesla bought a German automation company to help speed up assembly line production. Tesla also shut down its Fremont factory temporarily in February to prepare it for Model 3 production. This has to be one of the most dramatic, high stakes, and exciting business stories of our time on both the “do good and do well” sides of the equation.Maybe some day we will not need cars any longer and will have even better forms of mobility, so for me the more interesting side of Tesla is how it's going to be a major force in the larger energy transition to 100% renewables and a post fossil fuel economy. 
 
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Reverse Innovation Seminar w/Vijay Govindarajan will be available via WebEx! - dlc6@case.edu - Case Western Reserve University Mail

Reverse Innovation Seminar w/Vijay Govindarajan will be available via WebEx! - dlc6@case.edu - Case Western Reserve University Mail | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Weatherhead School of Management's
Department of Design & Innovation
cordially invites you to a research seminar
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Reverse innovation is one powerful design thinkers tool that can help companies stay ahead of the curve and capture the magic of the "high purpose economy."  
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From Trash to Treasure--it requires blue ocean strategy

From Trash to Treasure--it requires blue ocean strategy | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
How Sweden's recycling revolution is creating a blue ocean.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
An example of blue ocean strategy--this article demonstrates waste to wealth mindsets and the power of collective intention. Sweden imports garbage. And in terms of its own waste, Only one percent of Sweden’s rubbish is sent to landfills. Another 52 percent is converted into energy and the remaining 47 percent gets recycled. The amount of energy generated from waste alone provides heating to one million homes and electricity to 250,000. Meanwhile, the UK recycles just 44 percent of its waste. So how do the Swedes do it? Well, first of all, Sweden was quick to identify a growing demand. They understood early on that resource scarcity and climate change are both irreversible trends with clear trajectories. By looking at these trends from the right perspective – namely, drawing insights into how these trends will change value to customers and impact the country over time — Sweden was able to seize a blue ocean opportunity. The first efforts to convert waste to energy began as early as the mid-20th century with the implementation overtime of a cohesive national recycling policy. This boosted recycling rates and placed the nation as a global leader in recycling. By converting its waste into energy, Sweden has reduced its carbon dioxide emissions by 2.2 million tonnes a year. Between 1990 and 2006, carbon dioxide emissions went down by 34 percent, and greenhouse gas emissions are projected to fall by 76 percent by 2020, compared to levels in 1990. It's also importing garbage from neighboring countries and making $100 millions...dollars that can support education, social programs, and other national priorities. Every management class can benefit from this case study!
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We Can Pave Miles and Miles of Roads With Solar Panels

We Can Pave Miles and Miles of Roads With Solar Panels | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Scott and Julie Brusaw are working to replace more asphalt with solar cells—and possibly link the panels up with driverless cars.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
We all know--from Alfred North Whitehead's little classic "Adventure in Ideas"-- that one idea can change the world. That why I love to read this National Geographic series called "Chasing Genius." In this article, Scott and Julie Brusaw display the creative confidence and courage of bold innovators inspired by a greater Purpose. Here is part of the inspiring interview: Scott: In the beginning, when it was just an idea, half the people thought we were crazy and half the people thought we were genius. The first complaints were, you can't drive on glass, because the first time it rains everybody will slide off the road, which would be true if you didn't have traction. But we put traction on the glass. Then they said, it will never withstand the weight of a truck. We had it load-tested, and it will withstand a 250,000-pound truck, which is over three times the legal limit on our highways. So they dropped that argument. Slowly but surely, every time they'd come up with a new reason it won't work, we would prove it did work. The only one they've got left is the price. That's what we're working on—that's the last hurdle to get across. That's what mass manufacturing will do for us. What advice would you give to others who are pursuing their own big ideas? Scott: Just don't give up. Skeptics aren't something new. I just finished reading a book on the Wright brothers. They flew their airplane in 1903. The local newspapers were ridiculing them, saying, these crazy guys are going to kill themselves. Even Wilbur got so upset in 1902 [after] they crashed their glider, he told his brother, no man will ever fly for a thousand years. The very next year, they flew. Everybody's telling you you can't do something: If you start listening to that, you'll stop. But you've got to believe in what you're doing.
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Stop Using the Excuse “Organizational Change Is Hard”

Stop Using the Excuse “Organizational Change Is Hard” | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
“ In organizational change initiatives, our negative biases can create a toxic self-fulfilling prophecy. When a change project falls a day behind schedule, if leaders and employees believe that successful change is an unlikely outcome, they will regard this momentary setback as the dead canary in the coalmine of their change initiative. (Never mind the fact that three other initiatives are still on time or ahead of schedule.) Suddenly, employees disengage en masse and then the change engine begins to sputter in both perception and reality.”
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
During nearly every discussion about organizational change, someone makes the obvious assertion that “change is hard.” Indeed the field of Organization Development historically relied on a formula for change that asserts "people resist change." On the surface, this is true: change requires effort. But the problem with this attitude, which permeates all levels of our organizations, is that it equates “hard” with “failure,” and, by doing so, it hobbles our change initiatives, which have higher success rates than we lead ourselves to believe. Our biases toward failure is wired into our brains. In a recently published series of studies, University of Chicago researchers Ed O’Brien and Nadav Klein found that we assume that failure is a more likely outcome than success, and, as a result, we wrongly treat successful outcomes as flukes and bad results as irrefutable proof that change is difficult.
Our focus in Appreciative Inquiry leads to a different question: when do people and organizations thrive in transition? Results of A recent dissertation by Victoria Woo at Case Western Reserve University will be published soon, and the answers shed light on when and why people love change! For example did you ever see the moment an infant for the very first time pulled themselves up on their own two feet in their crib. I did when Daniel our first son did--and he was smiling, squealing with delight. When have you seen a change process where people are filled with delight?
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The Past Is Prologue: Accelerating the Energy Revolution

The Past Is Prologue: Accelerating the Energy Revolution | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
The Past Is Prologue
35 years of impact have set the stage for accelerating the energy revolution
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
In 2015, the world used energy 32 percent more efficiently than 25 years earlier, even while the world economy more than doubled in size, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. And globally, renewables have been the leading new energy source for two years in a row, at decreasing cost. Could it be that when markets lead, policy and politics follow? That's the thesis explored here by the head of the Rocky Mountain Institute, as they have been a tireless advocate of this perspective.  
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Panda Power to Elevate Green Energy Mindsets Among Kids and Young Entrepreneurs

Panda Power to Elevate Green Energy Mindsets Among Kids and Young Entrepreneurs | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
The first phase of Panda Green Energy's Panda Power Plant in Datong, China was recently connected to the grid.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
TO PEOPLE who believe that the world used to be a better place, and especially to those who argue that globalisation has done more economic harm than good, there is a simple, powerful riposte: In 1981 some 42% of the world’s population were extremely poor, according to the World Bank, and reported in The Economist. They were not just poorer than a large majority of their compatriots, as many rich countries define poverty among their own citizens today, but absolutely destitute. At best, they had barely enough money to eat and pay for necessities like clothes. At worst, they starved. Since then the number of people in absolute poverty has fallen by about 1bn and the number of non-poor people has gone up by roughly 4bn. By 2013, the most recent year for which reliable data exist, just 10.7% of the world’s population was poor (the modern yardstick for destitution is that a person consumes less than $1.90 a day at 2011 purchasing-power parity). Poverty has almost certainly retreated further since 2013: the World Bank’s estimate for 2016 is 9.1%. Homi Kharas of the Brookings Institution, a think-tank, calculates that someone escapes extreme poverty every 1.2 seconds. Now, the question is this: why am I placing these observations on poverty reduction in relationship to a story about a new solar array in China? Part of the reason is that China has been one of the success stories in poverty reduction, and is now leading the world in clean, renewable energy investment. China's poverty rate fell from 88% in 1981, to less than 6% today. And now the latest Global Status report from the Renewable Energy Policy Network (REN21) shows China leading the world in the solar boom: last year China contributed almost half the additions to global solar capacity, and it appears that they are educating the next generation to magnify this momentum. Yes this Panda solar array might at first blush look a bit like a cute public relations act. But it's part of a fascinating story of big change and transformation, happening fast--just what the world needs more of, as we seek to mobilize around our Paris agreements and global goals.
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11 facts (for business leaders) about world population you might not know.

11 facts (for business leaders) about world population you might not know. | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
the population of Africa is set to roughly double between now and 2050.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Every year, the world’s population is expanding by 83 million people. Right now, there are around 7.6 billion people in the world. By 2050, there will be just short of 10 billion. Population trends are significant for business leaders. For example, CK Prahalad, years ago, spoke about the business and society opportunities to "do good and do well" and proposed that business leaders think ahead and prepare for The Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid. And the numbers bear this out: the population of Africa is set to roughly double between now and 2050. Elsewhere, for example in Europe, fertility rates have fallen. Since the 1960s, the global birth rate has fallen to an average of 2.5 births per woman. However, that average is made up of highly diverse figures: in Africa its 4.7 births per woman, in Europe it’s 1.6 births.  By 2024 India will overtake China as the world’s most populous country. China currently has 1.4 billion inhabitants, closely followed by India with 1.3 billion. Together they make up 37% of the world’s population. 
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L’Oréal to sell Body Shop to Brazil's Natura in €1bn deal

L’Oréal to sell Body Shop to Brazil's Natura in €1bn deal | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
The Body Shop is to be sold in a €1bn (£877m) deal to Brazilian cosmetics company Natura, which owns the Aesop brand.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
What a good fit. One of the early leaders in sustainable business--The Body Shop soon to be sold by L'Oreall--will have a chance to accelerate it's commitment to becoming a net positive and regenerative company. It is being purchased by one of the world's leading B-corporations, Natura. Natura is the largest Brazilian cosmetics company. In 2014, it became the first publicly traded company to be certified as a “B corp”, meeting certain standards of social and environmental performance and transparency. “Natura and the Body Shop have always walked in parallel, and today their paths meet,” said Guilherme Leal, co-chair of Natura’s board. “The complementarity of our international footprints, the sustainable use of biodiversity in our products, a belief in ethics in management and fair relations with communities and a high degree of innovation constitute the pillars of the journey on which we are now embarking.” Years ago we did an AI project with Anita Roddick and the Body Shop, and you could tell that the passion she had for the idea of business as an agent of positive change in the world, was deep in the DNA of the culture. This will be a great story to watch... 
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Innovative Ways that Inspire Human Flourishing for All - Positivity Strategist - Robyn Stratton-Berkessel - Page 1

Innovative Ways that Inspire Human Flourishing for All - Positivity Strategist - Robyn Stratton-Berkessel - Page 1 | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
When did you last come away from an experience that had such an impact on you that you were filled with a joy and a hope that transformed you?
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
When you search for flourishing enterprise--and discover innovations all over the world of companies doing good and doing well in relation to the greatest global challenges of our day--you cannot help but to feel a sense of joy. Read this account of one of the participants and facilitators at The 4th Global Forum for Business as an Agent of World Benefit. Robyn Stratton-Berkessel was so moved by the consciousness shifts and the witnessing of the radical connectedness among "difference makers" of such high purpose, that she said: "When did you last come away from an experience that had such an impact on you that you were filled with a joy and a hope that transformed you?" Read on. Her blog is a wonderful summing up of the 4th Global Forum.
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Sustainable Amsterdam: A ‘Win-Win’ Post-Fossil Fuel Strategy

Sustainable Amsterdam: A ‘Win-Win’ Post-Fossil Fuel Strategy | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
John J. Berger, PhD. is an energy and environmental policy specialist who has produced ten books on climate, energy, and natural resource topics. He is the author of Climate Peril: The Intelligent Reader’s Guide to the Climate Crisis, and Climate Myths: The Campaign Against Climate Science, and is at work on a new book about climate solutions. Dr. Berger (www.johnjberger.com) also founded and directed Restoring the Earth, Inc
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
I just returned back to the U.S from Holland and I love Amsterdam’s sustainability vision: it is panoramic in scope, encompassing energy, water, raw material use and waste reuse as well as transportation and the deployment of public space. Green roofs and better storm water management are also on the agenda to help make the city more flood proof in anticipation of future heavier rains due to climate change. As set forth in Amsterdam: A Different Energy: 2040 Energy Strategy (2010), the city’s vision integrates economic and social aims with environmental and climate goals in the service of achieving a clean renewable energy economy with a broad range of public co-benefits rather than unrequited costs.
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Systems Change Can Happen Fast: All vehicles will be electric by 2025, Say Stanford Researchers

Systems Change Can Happen Fast: All vehicles will be electric by 2025, Say Stanford Researchers | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
No more petrol or diesel cars, buses, or trucks will be sold anywhere in the world within eight years.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
We are on the cusp of one of the fastest, deepest, most consequential disruptions of transportation in history. By 2030, within 10 years of regulatory approval of autonomous vehicles (AVs), 95% of U.S. passenger miles traveled will be served by on-demand autonomous electric vehicles owned by eets, not individuals, in a new business model we call “transport- as-a-service” (TaaS). 

 The TaaS disruption will have enormous implications across the transportation and oil industries, decimating entire portions of their value chains, causing oil demand and prices to plummet, and destroying trillions of dollars in investor value — but also creating trillions of dollars in new business opportunities, consumer surplus and GDP growth. The disruption will be driven by economics. 

 Using TaaS--according to a recent analysis out of Stanford University-- the average American family will save more than $5,600 per year in transportation costs, equivalent to a wage raise of 10%. This will keep an additional $1 trillion per year in Americans’ pockets by 2030, potentially generating the largest infusion of consumer spending in history. We have reached this conclusion through exhaustive analysis of data, market, consumer and regulatory dynamics, using well-established cost curves and assuming only existing technology. 

 This fascinating report from a Stanford economist presents overwhelming evidence that mainstream analysis is missing, yet again, the speed, scope and impact of technology disruption. Unlike those analyses, which produce linear and incremental forecasts, their modeling incorporates systems dynamics, including feedback loops, network effects and market forces, that better reflect the reality of fast-paced technology-adoption S-curves. These systems dynamics, unleashed as adoption of TaaS begins, will create a virtuous cycle of decreasing costs and increasing quality of service and convenience, which will in turn drive further adoption along an exponential S-curve.
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Ideo Studied Innovation In 100+ Companies–Here’s What It Found

Ideo Studied Innovation In 100+ Companies–Here’s What It Found | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Innovation is hard to pin down, but with these six insights Ideo says it’s cracking the code.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
We know that high purpose companies--with a purpose beyond profit-- have higher engagement scores. Now a new study shows high purpose is an innovation engine.  Ideo’s data shows that having a meaningful purpose beyond profit is important for businesses that  need to adapt quickly and successfully. Based on the companies that have used Ideo's new index to measure innovation--it is called "Creative Difference"-- projects and strategic solutions succeed 20.40% more often when leaders articulate the company’s mission in high purpose terms clearly and then reliably practice what they preach.
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Positive organization development: A new change equation that’s changing everything – Center for Positive Organizations

Positive organization development: A new change equation that’s changing everything – Center for Positive Organizations | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Drawing from his forthcoming book, David Cooperrider, will explore the proposition that the quest for a flourishing earth is the most significant organization development opportunity (OD) of the 21st century. When people in organizations work toward building a more flourishing world, they are poised to thrive in ways that ignite innovation, leadership development, and inspired workplace performance. Cooperrider calls this dynamic “mirror flourishing.” He will show how the design of positive institutions—institutions that magnify and refract our highest human strengths outward into the world—is OD’s ultimate North Star. Cooperrider envisions a watershed moment in OD research and practice where our field moves from micro-OD to macro-OD, and then back again.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
I am excited to be joining my colleagues at University of Michigan's Center for Positive Organizational Scholarship on April 24th, 2017. I will be doing talks on a major movement to Accelerate Positive Education in America as well as to speak to a new book I'm working on with Lindsey Godwin, where i will explore the proposition that the quest for a flourishing earth is the most significant organization development opportunity (OD) of the 21st century. When people in organizations work toward building a more flourishing world, they to are poised to thrive in ways that ignite innovation, leadership development, and inspired workplace performance. My colleagues and I call this dynamic “mirror flourishing.” I will then show how the design of positive institutions—institutions that magnify and refract our highest human strengths outward into the world—is OD’s ultimate North Star. What I am envisioning is a watershed moment in OD research and practice where our field moves from micro-OD to macro-OD, and then back again.
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