Business as an Agent of World Benefit
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Ben Carson: The patriotism of prosperity

Ben Carson: The patriotism of prosperity | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
“Ben Carson: The patriotism of prosperity The Desert Sun This kind of discourse demonstrates a profound misunderstanding of capitalism, which is an important component of American exceptionalism.”
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Ben Carson is articulate about the positive role of business via socially conscious prosperity--"it is patriotic." He continues: " There is absolutely no need for animosity between the government and business. When businesses are successful, the reservoirs from which taxes are paid are much larger, resulting in more money for the government even though tax rates would be lower. If we enact policies that allow American companies to bring back hundreds of billions of dollars in corporate profits to our country without punitive taxation, the upside would be considerably greater than any negative consequences. This is not complex economic theory; it’s common sense."
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Business as an Agent of World Benefit
Sustainable design; green economy; csr; sustainable development; Business as an Agent of World Benefit; Appreciative Inquiry; David Cooperrider; CSR
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Wind power is now cheaper than nuclear – the energy revolution is happening

Wind power is now cheaper than nuclear – the energy revolution is happening | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Government policy means the cost of offshore wind energy has halved. The benefits to the UK will be enormous, says John Sauven, director of Greenpeace
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
With the hurricane of bad news—where it sometimes seems there is no good news—there are quiet revolutions that need to be celebrated. By the 2020s wind energy will be as cheap or cheaper than any other form of power generation. It’s just become much cheaper than nuclear, even taking into account the additional costs associated with the wind’s intermittency.
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Is the World Falling Apart? Not at All.

Is the World Falling Apart? Not at All. | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Bill Gates is on a mission to prove that things are getting better—despite what you see on the news.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
A lot of people look at the news these days and think that the world is falling apart. Bill Gates says:" I have a different view. I think the world has never been better—more peaceful, prosperous, safe, or just. And I’m on a mission to prove it." What Gates is arguing is that we need to be looking more at the trend lines than the headlines. Yes we have lots on our hands as a human family. But if we look at the long arc of time and ask what's changed, what's better and where and why--what we might discover is that because things have gotten better that they can become better. In the new book Homo Prospectus--arguing that the human being is a prospecting being, always projecting ahead of ourselves--and that the way we see the future has huge impact or conditions everything we do in the present. We are anticipatory beings. If we believe things can get better and better it obviously impacts our imaginative capacities, our effort, and our capacity to shape our collective willpower. Also see Rosabeth Kanter's book "Confidence"--its defined as the experience of victory ahead of the success. So between Gates webtalk (follow the links), and the book Homo Prospectus (Seligman et al, 2017) and Kanter's Confidence, there is an interesting case to be made for noticing progress and possibilities, and exploring the proposition that "if things have gotten better, then they can get better."
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VW's Dieselgate bill hits $30 bln after another charge

VW's Dieselgate bill hits $30 bln after another charge | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
The German group is struggling to put the two-year-old “Dieselgate” scandal behind it, and working to transform itself into a maker of mass-market electric cars.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
What a case study on the defensive need to be a leader and not a laggard in an increasingly sustainability conscious world. VW, Europe’s biggest automaker, admitted in September 2015 that it had used illegal software to cheat U.S. diesel emissions tests, sparking the biggest business crisis in its 80-year history. Before Friday, it had set aside 22.6 billion euros ($26.7 billion) to cover costs such as fines and vehicle refits, and already its still growing bill is now $30 billion. At one point is this tragic story the company's market cap dropped in half. I love to ask my MBA students to take this case and design the turnaround transformation, paying attention to people, corporate culture, global sustainability's earth call and opportunities, stakeholder trust, shareholder expectations, and their theory of change. I ask them to read Chris Laszlo's books on Sustainable Value, and Embedded Sustainability (with Nadya Zhexembayeva) and Flourishing Enterprise. And almost  immediately all the students point to a Tesla and treat VW more as a poorly run business--with so little ahead of the curve business and society vision of the sustainability boom in our midst-- more than "just" a massive ethical breach drenched in bureaucracy. I'll report back when student teams have imagined what they--as design thinkers applying design thinking to a traumatized business-- would do at this stage.  
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2017 Annual Conference - OD Network

2017 Annual Conference - OD Network | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
The Call of our Time: OD Innovating for Impact
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
The field of Organization Development has been at the forefront of helping organizations succeed in a changing world through emphasizing the human factors in leading change in ways that are empowering of people, and based on values of collaboration, a spirit of inquiry, and the goal of full spectrum flourishing. Case Western Reserve University helped create the field with the 1st PhD in the field in 1960 and today its Masters in Positive Organization Development is pioneering once again . And our program is active in supporting the  the OD Network's annual international conference, happening in mid October. Help us get the word out:  Our world faces great opportunities — rebuilding trust in our financial systems and global relationships, turning around inequality and poverty, caring for our environment, shifting from less harm to full spectrum flourishing, and lifting up education and healthcare. Organization Development — being creative, inspirational, and deeply practical — is poised to inspire and generate the innovation being called forth by our organizations, communities, and society. The 2017 Conference invites all of us to think differently about our work, not as intervention but rather as innovation and delivering impact. Our conference will combine learning from thought-leaders and practitioners with hands-on action learning in multi-stakeholder client systems. Be part of the innovation in OD that will answer the call of our time. It is our time! We can create a world where business can prosper, people can flourish, and nature can thrive--and its the transition from here to there that represents the call of our time. 
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Sustainable Innovation: 5 Questions Every Company Should Ask Itself

Sustainable Innovation: 5 Questions Every Company Should Ask Itself | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Sustainable Innovation: 5 Questions Every Company Should Ask Itself
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
We live in worlds our questions create and in many ways all advances in humankind's history have been because of a shift in the questions asked. Einstein's genius, he said, was not in his answer but the question--where he spent most of his time. In this interesting article on sustainable designing the author argues that the typical design questions simply no longer work. For example IDEO's typical framing of questions around (user centered)  Desirability, (technological) Feasibility, and (financial) Viability.  Where, for example, are questions of inter-generational impacts? This article also has wonderful links to several design books and ways to generate what Chris Laszlo calls "sustainable value"....and how this quest can be an innovation engine.
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As Wealthy Millennials Take Control Of Family Fortunes, Impact Investing Is Set For A Big Boost

As Wealthy Millennials Take Control Of Family Fortunes, Impact Investing Is Set For A Big Boost | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Campden Wealth, a specialist U.K. research group, and UBS, the Swiss investment bank, surveyed 262 family offices with average assets of $921 million. Two-fifths (40.4%) expect to increase their allocations toward areas like education, environmental and resource efficiency, conservation, agriculture and food, and healthcare and wellness in the next decade or so.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Millennials will inherit up $59 trillion between now and 2060, the largest intergenerational wealth transfer in history, according to the Center on Wealth and Philanthropy at Boston College. And allocations for social impact investments could see huge surge toward businesses that are leading in sustainable value domains: education; environment; well-being and wellness, etc.  
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Developing the Skill, the Will, and the Trill for Learning

Developing the Skill, the Will, and the Trill for Learning | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
John Hattie proposes a theory to help educators understand why various teaching strategies work at different stages of learning.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
What the purpose of schooling? The deeper purpose of schooling is to equip students with learning strategies, or the skills of learning how to learn.” John Hattie, a great researcher in this area is more concerned with this later definition than of the more narrowly defined achievement, which is why he has attempted to come up with a model of learning that takes into account students’ skills and knowledge, learning dispositions and motivation. Hattie thinks of the three inputs students bring to learning as “skill, will, and thrill.”
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Apple’s Tim Cook Says it's Time Business to Fill the Breach and Step Up to the 'Moral Responsibility’ of Business

Apple’s Tim Cook Says it's Time Business to Fill the Breach and Step Up to the 'Moral Responsibility’ of Business | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Don’t expect him to become a politician, but the Apple C.E.O. sees gaps in governmental social policies that he believes companies like his are obliged to help fill.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Tim Cook is thrilled that his company is 100% renewable energy in the US and some 26 other countries. He loves talking education innovation and reform. He talks about the moral vacuum in government locked in gridlock, and was one of the key leaders to resign from the Presidents business leader advisory council. He sees business in a more moral leadership role than government--and talks about not so much social responsibility, but moral responsibility. As he puts it: "The reality is that government, for a long period of time, has for whatever set of reasons become less functional and isn’t working at the speed that it once was. And so it does fall, I think, not just on business but on all other areas of society to step up."
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Pat Heffernan's curator insight, September 10, 4:29 PM

Kudos, though some would say it's past time for business to step up to fill the breach, especially on diversity, inclusion, sustainability and climate change.

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Are We on the Verge of a New Golden Age?

Are We on the Verge of a New Golden Age? | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
A long-wave theory of technological and economic change suggests the financial malaise that began in 2007 may be about to end.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Here is an interesting conversation about the possibilities of a new golden age. Yet it's only in the cards if we cooperate and create systems that support supercooperation. As Art Kleiner notes: There has been some movement toward consensus. The 2016 Paris Agreement encouraged collaboration among government and business leaders (particularly tech leaders such as Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg) around climate change. Some technological platforms, such as Industry 4.0, are bringing disparate operations together. The populists are forcing some governments to streamline their internal bureaucracies and raise their productivity. Some recent elections — for example, those in France and the Netherlands — showed a clear appetite for consensus solutions. Commentators, including some in , PwC, are underscoring the urgent need to reframe the current system so that the economy once again delivers for society. (See “Common Purpose: Realigning Business, Economies, and Society,” by Colm Kelly and Blair Sheppard.) Don’t elements like these help?
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Capitalism's Next Stage can Release More Innovation With a More Balanced Logic and More Elevated Aim.

Capitalism's Next Stage can Release More Innovation With a More Balanced Logic and More Elevated Aim. | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
It’s time to expand capitalism’s single-minded directive, and replace it with a more balanced logic, writes
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
What if the economy was designed in service to full spectrum flourishing? Can we envision a next stage where business can excel, people can flourish, and nature can thrive? When designers innovate, they love challenges, design specs, and even embrace constraints because each invites more, not less, imagination and innovation. Articles like this force us to examine deep assumptions, listen to the voices of next generations, and call for honest exploration. For example, there is a common narrative emerging that we are eradicating extreme poverty. The final report on the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) concludes that the project has been ‘the most successful anti-poverty movement in history’. Two key claims underpin this narrative: that global poverty has been cut in half, and global hunger nearly in half, since 1990. This narrative has been touted by the United Nations and has been widely repeated by the media. But, as this article and its references show, closer inspection reveals that the UN’s claims about poverty and hunger are misleading, and perhaps even intentionally inaccurate. The MDGs have used targeted statistical techniques to make it seem as though the poverty and hunger trends have been improving when they might well have worsened. In addition, the MDGs use definitions of poverty and hunger that may dramatically underestimate the scale likely of these problems. Depending on the measures, some say that around four billion people remain in poverty today, and around two billion remain hungry – more than ever before in history, and between two and four times what the UN reports. The implications of this are profound. Worsening poverty and hunger trends indicate that our present model of development needs to be fundamentally redesigned and rethought, especially if the aim of economic success is to drive, enable, and empower not just survival but flourishing--economic, human, and ecological--as one unified fabric.
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Tiny house and Tesla are Teaming Up

Tiny house and Tesla are Teaming Up | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
The Tesla Tiny House is touring Australia as a mobile design studio so homeowners can check out Tesla's solar power systems and Powerwall.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Tiny house and Tesla are teaming up--all powered by solar--and they are on a roll. Instead of inaction and despair in relation to climate change, many are innovating and imagining the new possibilities...it been said that the sustainability revolution is unstoppable now, and it’s best understood by placing it in the context of other great global transformations – the agricultural revolution, the industrial revolution, the digital revolution...As Al Gore observes it, our sustainability revolution has the breadth and magnitude of the industrial revolution but it has the speed of the digital revolution--and while gravely serious, its call is to be creative.
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Sustainability Leaders Could Be at the forefront of the Fourth Industrial Revolution

Sustainability Leaders Could Be at the forefront of the Fourth Industrial Revolution | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Corporate sustainability leaders can turn challenges into opportunities for society and companies alike.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
By building foresight, cultures of innovation in all aspects of sustainable value creation, cultivating whole systems collaboration, and harnessing the power of meaning, sustainability brands and leaders could be at the forefront of the next episode of a caring capitalism. Take for example the need for Workforce education and the challenges from losing jobs to gaining meaning. According to some estimates, 50 percent of jobs in Europe and the United States will be lost due to digitalization. Fast-paced technology developments mean that many employees need retrain continuously to stay proficient as their jobs evolve, or to learn new skills. Yet current education systems (including workforce development) are not prepared to meet such demands. According to May 2017 McKinsey Global Institute report, 60 percent of companies report they cannot find graduates with the right skills. At the same time, almost 40 percent of employees feel their jobs do not match their skills. Sustainability managers of the future can help here as well, not only by making sure that employees receive programming or math skills training, but also by ensuring that employees are engaged in purpose at work. “The outcome we strive for,” said Philippe Forestier, executive vice president of global affairs and communities at Dassault Systèmes, “is the employee who is happy in his or her personal and family life and powerful at work.” Ultimately, and ideally, sustainability managers can take the lead in helping their organizations partner with educators to shape curricula. And to give work meaning, they can encourage employees to rethink the purpose of the company and their individual roles. OSRAM, for example, now ventures beyond its traditional efficiency improvement goals to think more about its role in improving safety and nutrition. And adidas and Parley for the Oceans have both developed shoes made of ocean debris. As Philipp Meister, adidas’ director of strategy for social and environmental affairs, noted during a discussion, “Connecting recycling plastics with dying oceans really resonated with people and created an emotional link." Just think how important this is: A million plastic bottles are bought around the world every minute and the number will jump another 20% by 2021, and only half are recycled. Every social and global issue is a business opportunity to do good and do well.
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Dan Goleman: Mindfulness, the Dalai Lama, and How Business Can Be a Force for Good

Dan Goleman: Mindfulness, the Dalai Lama, and How Business Can Be a Force for Good | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
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David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Here is a rich interview for leadership development that features companies such as Greyston-- see http://greyston.com/  ;   .... Dan Goleman is prolific and internationally known for his leadership work in emotional intelligence with colleagues such as Richard Boyatzis. Working as a science journalist, Goleman reported on the brain and behavioral sciences for The New York Times for many years.  This interview has lots to offer including: (1) a description and definition of emotional intelligence as comprised of four parts: self-awareness, self-management, empathy, & relationship skills (2) How mindfulness meditation and emotional intelligence are important for cultivating leadership that is more present and how the kind of person you are as you lead matters; (3) A winning combination for leadership: mindfulness, emotional intelligence, and values (4) Greystone Bakery as a shining example of using business as a force for good; (4) The driving principles advocated by the Dalai Lama in the vision expressed through one of Daniel’s newer books and how education is key; (5) The need for widespread education and competency development in systems thinking that’s rooted in empathy and compassion  and (6) How the news skews our view of what’s really going on in the world
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Electric Cars May Rule the World’s Roads by 2040

Electric Cars May Rule the World’s Roads by 2040 | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
New analysis suggests the gasoline engine may be like the horse-and-buggy a century ago: doomed to a rapid demise.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Based on how quickly horses and buggies disappeared in the early 1900s, the researchers argue, more than 90 per cent of all passenger vehicles in the U.S., Canada, Europe and other rich countries could be electric by 2040.
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Psychology and Organizational Behavior Education beats business training when it comes to entrepreneurship: Science

Psychology and Organizational Behavior Education beats business training when it comes to entrepreneurship: Science | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Psychology beats business training when it comes to entrepreneurship

Among small-business owners in Togo, at least
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
The Economist reports an intriguing study published in Science Magazine. If you were going to take very small enterprises, and give them business training (finance, marketing, strategy, etc) OR give them human science education on psychology, for example optimism, goal setting, motivation, group dynamics and relationships, etc--which would produce more achievement, business success, and innovation potential? As they report in Science and now The Economist, the researchers split the businesses into three groups. One group served as the control. Another received a conventional business training in subjects such as accounting and financial management, marketing and human resources. They were also given tips on how to formalise a business. The syllabus came from a course called Business Edge, developed by the International Finance Corporation. The final group was given a course inspired by psychological research. In the later  monthly sales rose by 17% compared with the conventional/business trained group, while profits were up by 30%. It also boosted innovation: recipients came up with more new products than the control group. The article's conclusion: "That suggests that entrepreneurship, or at least some mental habits useful for it, can indeed be taught. More surprising was how poorly the conventional training performed: as far as the researchers could tell, it had no effect at all. Budding entrepreneurs might want to avoid the business shelves and make for the psychology section."
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Elon Musk: Tesla's now turning its attention to networked versus command-and-control organizational culture to challenge Big Auto inertia

Elon Musk: Tesla's now turning its attention to networked versus command-and-control organizational culture to challenge Big Auto inertia | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
ELON MUSK: TESLA'S INTERNAL COMMUNICATION PROTOCOL CAN CHALLENGE BIG AUTO INERTIA
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Elon Musk knows he not only needs transformational products to win the future and elevate a small but radical company beyond the giant industry incumbents, but he also knows that he needs a company or organizational form where any person can leap the traditional hierarchies, talk to anyone, and do anything, at any level, and at any scale, that serves to advance the purpose and principles of the company. His recent letter is reprinted here--he gave everyone in his company the green light to transcend and leap over any semblance of command-and-control to advance the interests  and sustainability mission of the whole. He calls hierarchical communication patterns "simply dumb" unlike networks that tap the whole of collective intelligence with speed and freedom. Here is the empowering letter--a lesson on leadership for all our students studying sustainable value and flourishing enterprise here at Case Western Reserve University's MBA, EMBA, and MPODs! 

Subject: Communication Within Tesla by Elon Musk 

 "There are two schools of thought about how information should flow within companies. By far the most common way is chain of command, which means that you always flow communication through your manager. The problem with this approach is that, while it serves to enhance the power of the manager, it fails to serve the company. Instead of a problem getting solved quickly, where a person in one dept talks to a person in another dept and makes the right thing happen, people are forced to talk to their manager who talks to their manager who talks to the manager in the other dept who talks to someone on his team. Then the info has to flow back the other way again. This is incredibly dumb. Any manager who allows this to happen, let alone encourages it, will soon find themselves working at another company. No kidding. Anyone at Tesla can and should email/talk to anyone else according to what they think is the fastest way to solve a problem for the benefit of the whole company. You can talk to your manager's manager without his permission, you can talk directly to a VP in another dept, you can talk to me, you can talk to anyone without anyone else's permission. Moreover, you should consider yourself obligated to do so until the right thing happens. The point here is not random chitchat, but rather ensuring that we execute ultra-fast and well. We obviously cannot compete with the big car companies in size, so we must do so with intelligence and agility. One final point is that managers should work hard to ensure that they are not creating silos within the company that create an us vs. them mentality or impede communication in any way. This is unfortunately a natural tendency and needs to be actively fought. How can it possibly help Tesla for depts to erect barriers between themselves or see their success as relative within the company instead of collective? We are all in the same boat. Always view yourself as working for the good of the company and never your dept. Thanks, Elon"
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New Survey Explores The Value Of Renewable Energy To Corporations

New Survey Explores The Value Of Renewable Energy To Corporations | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Cost Parity Finds More Corporations Investing in Renewables
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Its fun to watch my son Matt's company--Apex Clean Energy--grow and help define the philosophical basis of what the founder has called "the new energy ethic."  Here Apex teams up with the magazine GreenBiz to present the survey results with business leaders. "More renewable energy, more value" is the theme.  The main takeaway is that corporations transitioning to renewables are also adopting a more holistic approach to business. The majority (65 percent) of survey respondents cite the primary importance of cost in their renewable energy purchases, but other factors also feature strongly. Corporate goal-setting is a strong driver of renewable energy purchases, cited by 70 percent of respondents. That finding is backed up by the premium that most respondents (65 percent) place on establishing their brand as a renewable energy leader.
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Sustainia100

This is the year of ‘Systemic Opportunity’!
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
This is the year of ‘Systemic Opportunity’!

 So often people ask me where they can go to see emerging sustainability solutions. Now in its fifth year, the Sustainia100 has tracked more than 4,500 solutions to date from all over the world. This year’s edition features solutions deployed in 188 countries, and more than half come from small and mid-sized enterprises. Showcasing everything from health solutions that tackle climate change, to renewable energy products that alleviate gender inequality, this year’s publication presents 100 solutions that respond to interconnected global challenges and help achieve the Sustainable Development Goals.
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300 Global Companies Commit to Science-Based Climate Targets Ahead of Climate Week NYC

300 Global Companies Commit to Science-Based Climate Targets Ahead of Climate Week NYC | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
At least 300 companies are now aligned with the Science Based Targets initiative, which provides a framework to help companies stay competitive while doing their part to mitigate climate change.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Three-hundred global corporations are advancing and accelerating their climate targets... As this article shows, the number of companies committed to climate action while incorporating this initiative has roughly doubled from just over a year ago, when 155 companies had pledged to do what they could in order to limit the world’s temperature to less than a 2°C increase this century. 

 Companies now onboard include Adobe, Merck, Nike, United Technologies and the Spanish telecommunications giant Telefónica. 

At least 50 of the companies that have announced a science-based emissions reduction plan to date are headquartered in the U.S. These companies join the likes of Mars Inc., which earlier this month it would invest $1 billion over the next several years on plans such as climate change mitigation and sustainable supply chain programs. The food conglomerate recently had its targets approved by a team of experts from this initiative. 

Of special note, the apparel manufacturer and retailer H&M announced a long-term “climate positive” plan this spring and say it is committed to this global program. And both spinoffs of the former HP, Hewlett Packard Enterprise Company and HP Inc., have already set targets aligned with the Science Based Targets Initiative. 

A study released earlier this year estimated that almost half of all Fortune 500 companies recognize climate change risks and have developed a plan for climate change mitigation or more aggressive clean energy adoption.

Many companies realize that nationwide climate change goals cannot occur without the private sector’s leadership. And over 600 business schools that are signatories to the Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME) are preparing cases and teaching modules highlighting these businesses that are leading the way!   see http://www.unprme.org/ and see also

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Six banking giants just decided to partner to create a new cryptocurrency

Six banking giants just decided to partner to create a new cryptocurrency | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Six of the world's biggest banks have partnered on a cryptocurrency that will enable the clearing and settling of transactions over a blockchain.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
While blockchain technology can be used for a variety of purposes — distributing aid, fighting climate change, tracking electricity in the grid, etc. — its potential for disruption is perhaps still greatest in the world of finance. Here are some nice links showing how blockchain is yet one more force for a more collaborative capitalism, with less middlemen, less centralization of power, and more horizontalism in the creation and exchange of value.
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Putting Humanity First in Our Organizations

Putting Humanity First in Our Organizations | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Are we overcomplicating management and leadership and ignoring what makes us people?
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Do good. Grow the company profitably. Share the wealth with employees. Ensure that everyone is having fun. Leave the world a better place. Is there a need to write anything else on how to run an organization?
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Learning to Love Design Thinking and Appreciative Inquiry into the Possible 

Learning to Love Design Thinking and Appreciative Inquiry into the Possible  | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Distributed Cognition (or embodied cognition) is the most current understanding of how cognition works. It states that rather than thinking only with our brains, we think with our environments.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:

The businesses that are leading the way in business and society value creation,  are often the  innovators leading the way in collaborative design thinking. 

Apple, as a large example, is using the same design thinking used in designing "insanely great products" and leveraging this core competency in becoming 100% powered by renewable energy. Designers don’t necessarily build that new version of the world — engineers, contractors, printers and many others play their parts — but they do show the path forward for change, take for example, rapid prototyping and even low resolution models, drawings, or artifacts. This is more powerful than most realize. I have seen a executive look at a mock-up of something and suddenly see a path forward for his company. I’ve seen an engineer say, “that’s not feasible,” and the exec reply, “But it’s right there.” The exec saw it, and now must have it. Seeing is really is believing. Do designers truly think in a different way? The key is the word “thinking.” this article--and a forthcoming book--makes an argument that Design Thinking is a kind of thinking based on three key cognition theories: Distributed Cognition; Expertise Thinking; and Iterative World Modeling. Distributed Cognition (or embodied-relational cognition) is the most current understanding of how cognition works. It states that rather than thinking only with our brains, we think in relatedness with our environments.--always contextualized. And design thinking is always creating multiplicity: while most of us come up with an idea, design thinking is not about an idea but many ideas, all in motion, moving from idea to model, and again next waves of multiplicity in the form of iterations, feedback loops, and more contextualized inquiry into what works. Thats why I love what our management school is doing--. It is teaching "managing as design thinking." (see Boland and Collopy's book) and "appreciative inquiry" (see https://appreciativeinquiry.champlain.edu/) where we, through practiced positive imagination, search the world for strengths, solutions, what gives life, what works, what's possible, and what's next. And where managing as design thinking is happening we find innovations way beyond the great tradeoff illusion. Companies eclipse the tradeoffs--lets say between products that can regenerate earth systems and products that are esthetic, attractive, profitable, relevant, and distinctive. And as one of our former management students Beau Dane (now head of sustainability at Fairmount Santrol and student of Appreciative Inquiry) once said: "this is when management gets exciting--when suddenly the seeming impossible becomes possible and doing good is the most viable, valuable, and vitalizing pathway to doing well." see https://weatherhead.case.edu/centers/fowler/about/

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Solar Power to Rival Nuclear by End of 2017

Solar Power to Rival Nuclear by End of 2017 | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
“Making nuclear power cheap was the Holy Grail,” said NPR’s Brian Mann, “[But] it never panned out.”
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
I love these kinds of factoids: By 2022 the amount of solar capacity could increase 10-fold, which could see solar becoming more than double the size of current worldwide nuclear capacity. Nuclear power currently supplies 11 percent of the world’s total power generation, with solar far behind at 1.8 percent. “The generation gap is significant,” concludes this report, “But a crossover is approaching.” The anticipated 81 GW of solar power deployed by the end of 2017 will be more than double the amount launched in 2014, and 32 times more than what was installed a decade ago. Despite the constant fits and starts, the solar industry continues to enjoy rapid growth (some say exponential), and the sector has been creating jobs at a high pace from California to New York. Worldwide, the clean energy sector employs approximately 10 million people, an increase of over 2 million from only two years ago.
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Patagonia Steps Up Its Public Lands Activism With First-Ever TV Commercial

Patagonia Steps Up Its Public Lands Activism With First-Ever TV Commercial | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Company founder Yvon Chouinard appeals to people in Montana, Utah, and Nevada to call their government representatives.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Business can be a powerful force for positive change. I first met Pategonia's founder, Yvon Chouinard, when he received the Inamori Prize for Ethics from our school, Case Western Reserve University.   Patagonia, the outdoor clothing company, has been a leader in the world of social responsible business for decades. The company pioneered organic and recycled clothing, and works toward such quality that it says "we hope you never have to buy another winter coat in your life-time"--and then they back it up with lifetime warranty. This year the company started a campaign to protect public lands in the U.S. As part of the campaign Patagonia is now airing its first-ever TV commercial. It is so interesting to me to see the moral voice of business leaders rising clearer and louder than ever before. When I met with Chouinard you could see how heartsick he was about the state of our world's response to climate change, species loss, and quality of our biophilia. His heart was wide open and his mastery of the detailed facts--both politically and ecologically--was inspiring. So authentic. Such a role model.Such a good business leader. 
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Ikigai: A Japanese concept to improve work and life and organizations

Ikigai: A Japanese concept to improve work and life and organizations | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
To those in the West who are more familiar with the concept of ikigai, it’s often associated with a Venn diagram with four overlapping qualities: what you love, what you are good at, what the world needs, and what you can be paid for.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
What is at the intersection of what you love, what you are good at, what the world is calling out for, and what you can be paid for? In Japan its called Ikigai: and its a concept that can guide the growth of individual well-being and help take a more strategic view of enterprise wide flourishing. As noted by Kyle Westaway notes in his briefing, " with no direct English translation, ikigai is a Japanese term that embodies the idea of happiness in living. Essentially, ikigai is the reason why you get up in the morning. To those in the West who are more familiar with the concept of ikigai, it’s often associated with a Venn diagram with four overlapping qualities: what you love, what you are good at, what the world needs, and what you can be paid for. Ikigai is what allows you to look forward to the future even if you’re miserable right now. It’s about feeling your work makes a difference in people’s lives. But this isn’t necessarily limited to your career. In fact, in a survey of 2,000 Japanese men and women conducted by Central Research Services in 2010, just 31% of recipients considered work as their ikigai. Someone’s value in life can be work – but is certainly not limited to that. Knowing your ikigai alone is not enough. Simply put, you need an outlet. Ikigai is “purpose in action.” Learn more at the BBC (9 minutes)."
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