Business as an Agent of World Benefit
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Why “Going Green” Is The Future For Your Business

Why “Going Green” Is The Future For Your Business | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Owning a business in the modern age is no easy feat and making that business successful is a whole ordeal all on its own. While the socially
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:

Going green is one of the most important thing companies can do today to win the future--especially when sustainability is embedded, not bolted on, and especially when companies inspire the workplace with visions not of "less harm" but of creating a world of enterprise flourishing. Like any change initiative, we can talk about three levels of change—with level three being the deepest:

 

Level 1: These involve sustainability efforts in enterprise systems, strategies, and processes, including stakeholder partnerships, and often result in cost savings and reductions in the harm of new products, waste, toxicities, energy systems, and overall footprint. Its here that tools such as lean and green, life-cycle analysis; and others are introduced through training, manuals, videos, and expert analysis. 

 

Level 2: Changes in organizational culture and identity—these are deeper changes in beliefs, norms, ways of operating, and assumptions about business in society—and these assumptions often become sacred in terms of company values where words and deeds become aligned and the sustainability culture of doing less harm becomes embedded, not simply a bolt on, and at its best becomes so enculturated that it permeates everything—strategy, operations, everyday language and behavior.

 

Level 3: Changes in business leadership’s sense of self and commitment to move from systems of less harm to motivations to do advance the sources of positive good—to leave a positive fingerprint or signature on the world-- arising from an sense of genuine consciousness of connection, inner inspiration of the kind of person we are or want to become, and positive beliefs in the power of conscious intention. 

 

Mark your calendar to learn about these change opportunities--what's next for the sustainability field--  at the next Global Forum for Business as an Agent of World Benefit at Case Western Reserve University. There will be amazing CEOs, Appreciative Inquiry design studios,  Nobel Prize winners, and leading authors such as Raj Sisodia, Peter Senge, Chris Laszlo, Bruce Cryer, Jane Nelson of Harvard and more! Sign up. click below. bring a team. http://globalforumbawb.com/ 

 

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Business as an Agent of World Benefit
Sustainable design; green economy; csr; sustainable development; Business as an Agent of World Benefit; Appreciative Inquiry; David Cooperrider; CSR
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GM Has Committed to 100% Renewable Energy by 2050

GM Has Committed to 100% Renewable Energy by 2050 | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
“Establishing a 100 percent renewable energy goal helps us better serve society by reducing environmental impact,” said GM Chairman and CEO Mary Barra. “This pursuit of renewable energy benefits our customers and communities through cleaner air while strengthening our business through lower and more stable energy costs.”
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
I love the phrase "we are going 100% renewable energy" -- and I am hearing these words over and over now. I think we are reaching a tipping point. Never before have we experienced such an exciting time for clean energy innovation. In 2015, venture capitalists and private equity investors funneled a little over $6 billion into clean energy companies globally, 27 percent more than in 2014. And according to Standard & Poor’s, the Paris Agreement will unleash over $16 trillion in investment in cleantech over the next 15 years.
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Indian firm leads in a race to turn carbon into clean profit

Indian firm leads in a race to turn carbon into clean profit | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Carbonclean is turning planet-heating emissions into profit by converting CO2 into baking powder – and could lock up 60,000 tonnes of CO2 a year
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
The race to turn carbon into clean profit is on! A story from the Optimist is inspiring. In southern India, a carbon capture plant at the industrial port of Tuticorin has figured out how to successfully use CO2 emissions to make baking soda. Unlike carbon capture and storage, in which emissions are forced into underground rocks at great cost and no economic benefit, the Tuticorin plant is said to be the first economically viable industrial scale example of carbon capture. The firm behind the process says its chemical will lock up 60,000 tons of CO2 a year and the technology is attracting interest from around the world.
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Peter Diamandis

Peter Diamandis | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
The graph below shows that, if solar electricity continues on its current demonetization trajectory, by the time solar capacity triples to 600GW (by 2020 or 2021, as a rough estimate), we could see global unsubsidized solar prices that are roughly half the cost of coal and natural gas.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
These are the kinds of things I wish were being splashed all over the news--because it's big news. That things are getting better and better is not a common understanding. But more important than good news today is the good news we can make happen in the future. In 88 minutes, 470 exajoules of energy from the sun hits the Earth’s surface, as much energy as humanity consumes in a year. In 112 hours – less than five days – it provides 36 zettajoules of energy. That’s as much energy as is contained in all proven reserves of oil, coal and natural gas on the planet. And the price of solar electricity: by 2021 we could see global unsubsidized solar prices that are roughly half the cost of coal and natural gas.
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COP22: Reactions from Social Entrepreneurs

COP22: Reactions from Social Entrepreneurs | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it

With 2016 on track to be the hottest year on record and temperatures 20°C higher than expected in the Artic this month, addressing climate change though a coordinated, multi-sector approach is becoming increasingly urgent.

Last year’s Paris Agreement was a historic milestone in the climate movement, with a global consensus reached around targets to limit global temperature increase to well below 2°C, reach zero net greenhouse gas emissions in the second half of the century, and re-visit and strengthen the national climate plans (NDCs) of participating countries every five years. The Paris Agreement also entered into force at unprecedented speed, less than a year after its adoption at COP21, compared to eight years for the Kyoto Protocol.

This month’s COP22 talks in Marrakesh demonstrated a continued spirit of global unity to tackle climate change, despite the results of the US election. Leading US businesses left no doubt about their commitment to the low-carbon future, issuing a public statement signed by 365 companies and investors reiterating their support for the Paris Climate Agreement and supportive low-carbon policies. The “Business Backs Low-Carbon USA” statement, signed by DuPont, General Mills, Kellogg’s, Mars, and other iconic brands, was addressed to President-elect Trump and other US leaders.

David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
I love the insights and reflections of our young social entrepreneurs and more seasoned leaders. The Skoll Foundation put together their observations from the transition from Paris agreements to this month's talks in Marrakesh. For example Cindy Lubbers commented:  "Despite the long shadow from the US election, the climate negotiations in Morocco, which wrapped up last weekend, were a remarkable feat of global optimism, resolve, and concrete action by countries and the business community alike. Leading US businesses left no doubt about their commitment to the low-carbon future, issuing a public statement signed by 365 companies and investors reiterating their support for the Paris Climate Agreement and supportive low-carbon policies. The “Business Backs Low-Carbon USA” statement, signed by DuPont, General Mills, Kellogg’s, Mars, and other iconic brands, was addressed to President-elect Trump and other US leaders. 
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The scientists with reasons to be cheerful

The scientists with reasons to be cheerful | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it

"Not every problem has an obvious solution, which is why during the 1850s Britain bought 300,000 tons of bird poo a year from Peru. This was guano, the wonder fertiliser that had been discovered by Europeans at the start of that century. It was shipped back to the motherland, where it helped to feed the burgeoning and rapidly industrialising population, mainly through the medium of turnips.

In a modern globalised world, the idea of transporting large quantities of avian dung thousands of miles in wooden sailing boats to grow turnips seems less incongruous. For Ruth DeFries, a professor of ecology and sustainable development at Columbia University in New York, the guano craze is one example of how over the centuries human ingenuity has risen to the challenge of feeding ourselves.

David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
We’re older, wiser, healthier: Max Roser, who runs Our World in Data, uses statistics to tell the real stories about our world.
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Google just notched a big victory in the fight against climate change

Google just notched a big victory in the fight against climate change | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Google will soon purchase enough renewable energy for all of its global operations
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
In 2015 alone, Google consumed 5.2 terawatt hours of electricity, almost as much as the entire city of San Francisco. Soon, in 2017, it will power 100% of its global operations with renewable energy. This obviously is a big victory in a world of political uncertainty that could easily start backtracking from Paris agreements, etc. But every company should be inspired by steps forward like this that are win-win, being both good for business and better for our sustainable value future. 
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The best way for power companies to position themselves for a bright future in tomorrow’s clean energy economy is to break the common solar-versus-utility narrative.

The best way for power companies to position themselves for a bright future in tomorrow’s clean energy economy is to break the common solar-versus-utility narrative. | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Power companies that take initiative now and work with distributed energy resources can position themselves well in tomorrow’s clean energy economy
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Utility companies are at a crossroads and have some critical decisions to make fairly quickly, regarding whether or not and how they incorporate renewable energy as part of their power grids. First and foremost, they need to change the typical solar-versus-utility perspective. As this writer points out, there will be increasing consequences for those utility companies that choose not to pursue clean energy options. They must, she says, make the choice whether to be “leaders or laggards.” 

 “In order to stay competitive, utility companies, grid operators and the people who regulate them need to do what’s right for people and planet — incorporate renewable energy, storage and software to modernize the grid,” Gavriella Keyles states. “The momentum for renewable energy builds as prices fall and emissions regulations tighten. Supporting this trend doesn’t stop at pro-solar policies. Innovating to keep up with the technology is essential for both wider adoption of renewables and a better, more resilient grid.”
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Lady Scotland Says We Need a Quantum Shift: The Agenda is Not Sustainability as Less Harm But Regenerative Reversal 

Lady Scotland Says We Need a Quantum Shift: The Agenda is Not Sustainability as Less Harm But Regenerative Reversal  | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Cities that mimic forests, bricks made from converted carbon dioxide and highways lined with wind turbines powered by traffic. These are ideas that, for now, still belong to a distant, brighter future – when the world’s focus can be turned from halting runaway climate change to actually reversing it.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Lady Scotland Secretary-General of the Commonwealth of 52 Nations says we need a quantum shift:  “I am offering myself as the advocate for climate regenerative change,” she told the workshop, calling on participants to come up with the solutions that could deliver a “quantum shift” in each of the Commonwealth’s member states when it came to climate change policy. Sustainability as less harm is simply not bold enough or inspiring enough to engender the heroic energy we need. Thank you Lady Scotland!
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Tesla Unveils its New Line of Camouflaged Solar Panels

Tesla Unveils its New Line of Camouflaged Solar Panels | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Tesla's new line of energy-harvesting roof tiles are a key part of Elon Musk's plan to make solar sexy.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Elon Musk continues to develop technology and products that incorporate solar power into residential design. He just unveiled one of the latest advancements: a line of camouflaged solar panel roof tiles for homes. The article features the Tesla CEO’s recent dramatic presentation at Universal Studios in LA, where a row of backlot homes on Wisteria Lane where the TV series “Desperate Housewives” was filmed were equipped with the panels. 

In his remarks, Musk described the innovative construction material “as a series of micro louvers that work like a privacy screen on a laptop, and said the company is working with 3M on the tech. The effect is dramatic in person. From shallow angles, the tiles appear nontransparent. But as your viewing angle approaches 90 degrees, the underlying solar cell becomes more and more visible. The result is a tile that permits the passage of sunlight from overhead, but still looks opaque to anyone at ground level.”
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Empowering the Next Generation | Conservancy Talk

Empowering the Next Generation | Conservancy Talk | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Brigitte Griswold makes the case that investing in our youth -- especially through paid internships -- is an investment in a sustainable future.
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In this opinion piece from The Nature Conservancy, the writer promotes the importance of engaging and empowering children early on as an investment in a sustainable future. By making paid internships and competitive wage earning opportunities available, we can encourage our youth – especially those who may come from families living below the poverty line – to pursue advanced education and professions in the environmental sector. 

“We in the non-profit environmental community must… invest in deeper efforts to empower youth from all socioeconomic backgrounds to achieve their full potential as environmental leaders,” opines Brigitte Griswold. “The good news is, we can collectively work together to attract and retain the young people who will ultimately help us solve multifaceted global challenges—like climate change—which demand more varied viewpoints and experiences than ever.”
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Now Is the Greatest Time to Be Alive

Now Is the Greatest Time to Be Alive | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
We are far better equipped to take on the challenges we face than at any time in human history.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
The progress possibilities of our age are enormous--that where entrepreneurs such as Peter Diamandis and politicians such as Barrack Obama agree. That’s why I centered this on the idea of frontiers—stories and ideas about what’s over the next horizon, about what lies on the other side of the barriers we haven’t broken through yet. I wanted to explore how we get past where we are today to build a world that’s even better for us all—as individuals, as communities, as a country, and as a planet.
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Low cost battery has potential as grid storage solution

Low cost battery has potential as grid storage solution | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Chemists have developed a grid storage solution that could help communities derive more of their energy from renewable sources. Prof Linda Nazar and her colleagues from the Faculty of Science at the University of Waterloo developed the long-lasting zinc-ion battery, which costs half the price of current lithium-ion batteries. Their findings are published in Nature […]
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
This article from Nature Energy has a technical bent, but the innovation is an important one. Prof Linda Nazar and her colleagues from the Faculty of Science at the University of Waterloo developed the long-lasting zinc-ion battery, which costs half the price of current lithium-ion batteries. 

“The worldwide demand for sustainable energy has triggered a search for a reliable, low-cost way to store it,” said Nazar, a Canada Research Chair in Solid State Energy Materials and a University Research Professor in the Department of Chemistry. “The aqueous zinc-ion battery we’ve developed is ideal for this type of application because it’s relatively inexpensive and it’s inherently safe.” 

Another advantage of this zinc battery technology is that it costs manufacturers less because it does not need special conditions to make it. The fabrication of lithium ion batteries, on the other hand, requires ultra-low humidity and the handling of flammable materials. According to the article, in the next decade, the global market for energy storage is expected to grow to $25 billion.
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biomimicry: build on what works

biomimicry: build on what works | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
To find boundless opportunity for innovative design, look to nature. Here's inspiration from some of our best talks on the topic.
Via Janine Benyus
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Build on what works. Context is everything. Relationship before task. These are just a few of the ways innovation inspired by life can be strengthened through biomimicry. Our universe of strengths--the appreciable world--is so much larger than our appreciative eyes. And that's what leadership is about: it's about seeing--the best and the possible.
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UN Global Compact Searching for Local SDG Pioneers

UN Global Compact Executive Director Lise Kingo announces search for local entrepreneurs and change-makers who are making the global goals local business
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
So happy to be working www.aim2flourish.com and it's support with the PRME and Global Compact (some 8,000 corporations)...UN Global Compact Executive Director Lise Kingo announces search for local entrepreneurs and change-makers who are making the global goals local business. If you are a business leader or change-maker advancing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) on a local level, visit the website to submit your story today: http://unglobalcompact.org/sdgpioneers.
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Best of Green Schools 2016

Best of Green Schools 2016
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Solar gardens. Building green walls with waste. Creating a solar campus while learning physics. This is a huge opportunity to link positive psychology (individual flourishing) with sustainability-as-flourishing (full spectrum flourishing.) This might be the biggest positive education opportunity of the 21st century. It's what we've written about as "mirror flourishing": when we work together to build a better world "out there" guess where the flourishing also happens--yes, it's the "in-here." That's why these awards are so important.    The Best of Green Schools awards recognize the people, schools, campuses and organizations instigating positive change to the status quo by creating healthier, more sustainable and more efficient learning environments. This video highlights the winners of Best of Green Schools 2016 and showcases the diversity and effort of the various recipients in amplifying students’ role in the green schools movement; serving as conduits for collaboration and facilitating partnerships between businesses, school districts and local agencies; and developing and implementing plans to improve eco-literacy, building performance, and health and well-being, among others.
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Stiller Family Foundation Makes $1M Gift to Champlain College’s David L. Cooperrider Center For Appreciative Inquiry

Stiller Family Foundation Makes $1M Gift to Champlain College’s David L. Cooperrider Center For Appreciative Inquiry | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it

Dr. Lindsey Godwin, Professor of Management in the Stiller School of Business and Director of the Cooperrider Center, said the Stiller Family Foundation gift will fund the planning and implementation of a Positive Education Summit in 2018 which is expected to attract a wide array of stakeholders, including teachers, administrators, parents, students, scholars, government and business leaders, and international thought-leaders from around the world.

The Positive Education Summit's goal will be to unite the best in the field of education with the best in the field of positive psychology to accelerate the impacts of positive education for some 23 million preschool children, 50 million students in K-12 classrooms and 20+ million students in higher education, and also help further support schools as positive institutions that are also great places to work for all employees, Godwin said.


http://www.champlain.edu/about-champlain/news-and-events/copperrider-gift

David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:

BURLINGTON, Vt. -- Champlain College's David L. Cooperrider Center for Appreciative Inquiry in the Stiller School of Business has received a $1 million gift from the Stiller Family Foundation to plan and convene a national Positive Education Summit with the Mayerson Academy and others that will use Appreciative Inquiry to accelerate positive education from early childhood on up. see http://www.champlain.edu/about-champlain/news-and-events/copperrider-gift
  
I was so lucky to learn with and work with Bob Stiller starting in the early 2000's when he was the the CEO of Green Mountain Coffee Roasters. The Stiller Family’s catalytic gift has the potential to touch the lives of tens of millions of kids. The fact is we have an unprecedented opportunity in human history to help every child and young person fulfill their potential and achieve both well-being and success. From breakthroughs in the positive psychology of human strengths to the untold story of the greatest educational innovations most people have never heard about, this initiative will create action that is a generation ahead of current thinking.  Yes it will take hundreds and even thousands of organizations and partners to do it. That’s the gift of the Appreciative Inquiry Summit. And in the end here is my prediction: everyone who becomes a partner in this will say at the end of their lives: “my life had meaning because I was part of a positive revolution”—for our kids, our society, and our common future.

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Cartography of the Anthropocene - Globaïa--Big Data Visualization

Cartography of the Anthropocene - Globaïa--Big Data Visualization | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
It's amazing what happens to us when we put things into geological time--see these charts at project Globaia. We’re such a very young species in geological terms. Earth is about 4.5 billion years old. Homo sapiens didn’t show up until 2 million years ago. But in our short stint so far—and especially since the industrial revolution—humans have changed the planet’s ecosystem in profound ways. We’ve built sprawling megacities and transportation networks to connect them, altered the composition of the atmosphere and the ocean, and even—gulp—changed the climate (see Fast Company). Many scientists think this epoch of human influence deserves its own geologic name, like the Pliestocene or the Pliocene. In 2000, the Nobel Laureate Paul Crutzen proposed calling it the Anthropocene. The International Commission on Stratigraphy may make that label official. 
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Warren Buffett: Why Wind Power Isn't Going Away

Warren Buffett: Why Wind Power Isn't Going Away | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
But wind will continue to have at least one powerful backer: Warren Buffett, whose Berkshire Hathaway Energy division is on track to become the country’s largest producer of wind power.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
I love following the wind energy successes, as my son Matt works in the financing domain in this industry. And the prices keep dropping. As Stephen Gandel and Katie Fehrenbacher report this week in Fortune, the average cost of wind energy dropped by about a third between 2008 and 2013; in some parts of the country, it’s the cheapest electricity source available. Not coincidentally, as the chart below shows, wind’s share of renewable-energy output has soared. The Department of Energy expects wind to generate 10% of America’s electricity by 2020, up from about 7% today. (By comparison, coal and natural gas today each account for about a third.)
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The Factory as Forest

The Factory as Forest | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
"Our goal is to achieve zero negative environmental impacts by 2020," said Erin Meezan, vice president at Interface, an innovative producer of carpets and textiles, at Greenbuild in Los Angeles.
Via Janine Benyus
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Restoration. Regeneration. Renewal. Net positive design. These are the goals of an increasing number of companies. “Our goal is to achieve zero negative environmental impacts by 2020,” said Erin Meezan, vice president at Interface, an innovative producer of carpets and textiles. But as the firm nears its goal, it’s now pursuing an even more ambitious vision — the “factory as forest,” in which their manufacturing facilities become positive contributors to the environment, providing as much ecosystem service benefits as their surrounding landscape. This astonishing vision comes from Interface’s deceased founder Ray Anderson and Janine Benyus, whose firm, Biomimicry 3.8, is advising them. Benyus’ guiding idea: “When the forest and the city are functionally indistinguishable, then we know we’ve embedded sustainability.” To achieve this, she calls for using biomimetic design strategies that “consciously emulate nature’s designs.” This is because nature, with 3.8 billion years of evolution, has “already solved most challenges.”
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Could Nanotechnology End Hunger?

Could Nanotechnology End Hunger? | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Increasing numbers of scientists are investigating how nanotechnology could help us grow more food with less.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Thinking nano small could be the solution to a mega issue. This article details how nanotechnology could revolutionize our ability to grow enough food to feed the hungry and prepare for our rather daunting future food production demands. Between the expected disruptions to agriculture from climate change and the projected surge in our global population – 9 billion people by 2050 – this is an essential issue that needs to be addressed now.  
“Scientists are racing to boost food production while minimizing collateral damage to the environment,” writes Melissa Pandika. “To tackle this huge problem, they’re thinking small — very small, as in nanoparticles a fraction of the diameter of a human hair. Three of the most promising developments deploy nanoparticles that boost the ability of plants to absorb nutrients in the soil, nanocapsules that release a steady supply of pesticides and nanosensors that measure and adjust moisture levels in the soil via automated irrigation systems.”
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The Comprehensive Business Case for Sustainability is Clear and Strong. 

Today’s executives are dealing with a complex and unprecedented brew of social, environmental, market, and technological trends. These require sophisticated, sustainability-based management. Yet executives are often reluctant to place sustainability core to their company’s business strategy in the mistaken belief that the costs outweigh the benefits. On the contrary, academic research and business experience point to quite the opposite.

Embedded sustainability efforts clearly result in a positive impact on business performance.
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Poland Unveils Glow-In-The-Dark Bicycle Path That Is Charged By The Sun

Poland Unveils Glow-In-The-Dark Bicycle Path That Is Charged By The Sun | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Cycling is one of the most eco-friendly ways to travel, and thanks to this solar-powered bike lane that glows in the dark, it just got even moreso.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
One of the world’s leading urban planning gurus, Gil Penalosa, promotes the growth of biking, walking and park opportunities throughout communities for people from ages 8 to 80. (Thus, the name of his nonprofit organization: 8 80 Cities.) Poland’s new glow-in-the-dark bicycle path stands as a model innovation for cities that will markedly increase visibility and safety for pre-dawn and late-night bike riders.
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How might nature design a financial system?

How might nature design a financial system? | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
A recurring theme in the biomimicry track of this year’s SXSW Eco conference was the increasing multidimensionality of ways biomimicry is being applied not just to products, but also to processes and systems. Chemistry, investing, leadership, branding: all can be bioinspired. I’m enthusiastic about applying biomimicry to financial architecture, or the architectures of exchange. Biomimicry offers a new language, longer timeframe, wider lens, and better-rooted framework overall for thinking about system design. It allows us to finally step “outside” (literally and figuratively) the narrow conceptual models of finance that are currently sinking our collective ship. How would nature design a financial system? This blog post is adapted from a short presentation I gave at SXSW Eco on this question.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Natural Capitalism (the book) helped bring business and ecology together---but has it gone far enough? Perhaps we need to think beyond the idea of "a business" and think about the design of the future financial system itself. Today, sustainability is a core business strategy of most leaders in the commercial sector. Companies are saving money and increasing shareholder value as they reduce their environmental footprints. We have changed the world of business for the better. For all the successes, though, it's hard to look at the current state of the world and feel that we are making enough of a difference. Every major ecosystem on the planet is in decline. Many global social indicators are abysmal. By the end of 2015 there were 65.3 million people forcibly displaced. Hundreds of millions more do not have enough food to lead a healthy active life--although progress in this arena has been exponential. The global temperature has risen 1.10°C since 1880. CO2 in the atmosphere is at 404 PPM and average temperatures continue to rise. Scientists estimate that the present rate of extinction may be as high as 140,000 species per year. Clearly, sustainability as we know it, is not enough. Perhaps we need to think creatively, like a designer, about the financial systems.

I love the question: How might nature design a financial system? This article is about leveraging biomimicry--appreciating and emulating life's genius--to explore a higher quality of life financial system.

Biomimicry offers a  language, longer timeframe, wider lens, and better-rooted framework overall for thinking about system design. It allows us to finally step “outside” (literally and figuratively) the narrow conceptual models of finance that are propelling our collective ship--quite blindly. How would nature design a financial system?
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Education for Sustainability | Jaimie Cloud

Jaimie Cloud is passionate about inspiring young people to think about the world, their relationship to it, and their ability to influence it in an entirel
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Jamie Cloud is showing how brilliant children are when given the tools to design sustainable schools, communities, and visions of a better world. Wonderful examples of how to make engaged education come alive with meaning, purpose, and value. Deep down every human being wants their life to matter, to make a difference. What Jamie is doing is showing Positive Education in inspired action--sustainable design thinking is something that brings positive emotion, engagement, high quality relationships, meaning, and achievement--elements that add up to flourishing--into schools in a big time way. I love the examples. They inspire and rewire what we think of when we say the good classroom!
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5 signs sustainability is the new engine for global economic growth

5 signs sustainability is the new engine for global economic growth | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Whole industries are being created as new business models emerge that create economic growth, environmental health and vast opportunities for global prosperity.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
We have seen a continuing gain in momentum for sustainability, as businesses and citizens realize it’s not only the right thing to do, but it can profit everyone in many ways.

“Sustainability is the transformative economic catalyst that also happily aligns with our own basic self-interest,” says writer Timothy Nixon. “Specifically, it’s about ‘sustainable growth,’ by which I mean increasing prosperity while at the same time improving environmental and social performance. Why does sustainable growth matter so much? Because the great movers of our global economy are orienting toward it, rewarding better performance and punishing risk.”

 In the article, Nixon goes on to detail five concentrations of great movers of the global economy into customers, regulators, investors, new energy and values.
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Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, October 8, 2016 12:39 PM
Useful post, presenting some good tips. For those who speak Portuguese or Spanish and are interested in sustainability, please visit http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com/nossos-blogs/sustentabilidade-e-gestao/
Ron McIntyre's curator insight, October 9, 2016 3:29 PM

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Create Wise Leader's curator insight, October 10, 2016 11:53 AM
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