Business as an Agent of World Benefit
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Tesla, Panasonic Sign Battery Gigafactory Deal

Tesla, Panasonic Sign Battery Gigafactory Deal | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
“Electric automaker Tesla Motors has reached an agreement with electronics giant Panasonic Corp to build a massive US battery plant.”
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Tesla is so much more than an automobile revolution. It may be the most catalytic force for the big transition to renewables. With that battery gigafactory, Tesla helps advance clean energy storage. In February, Tesla revealed plans to build a 10-million-square-foot facility, or gigafactory, to produce more lithium-ion batteries annually by 2020 than were made worldwide in 2013. The Palo Alto, Calif.-based automaker estimates the gigafactory will have the capacity to produce 50 gigawatt hours of battery packs a year by 2020. The battery packs will be used for its existing Model S luxury sedan and a cheaper next-generation vehicle, to be called the Model 3. The plant will also produce cells, modules and packs for the stationary storage market.
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Business as an Agent of World Benefit
Sustainable design; green economy; csr; sustainable development; Business as an Agent of World Benefit; Appreciative Inquiry; David Cooperrider; CSR
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Patagonia Steps Up Its Public Lands Activism With First-Ever TV Commercial

Patagonia Steps Up Its Public Lands Activism With First-Ever TV Commercial | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Company founder Yvon Chouinard appeals to people in Montana, Utah, and Nevada to call their government representatives.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Business can be a powerful force for positive change. I first met Pategonia's founder, Yvon Chouinard, when he received the Inamori Prize for Ethics from our school, Case Western Reserve University.   Patagonia, the outdoor clothing company, has been a leader in the world of social responsible business for decades. The company pioneered organic and recycled clothing, and works toward such quality that it says "we hope you never have to buy another winter coat in your life-time"--and then they back it up with lifetime warranty. This year the company started a campaign to protect public lands in the U.S. As part of the campaign Patagonia is now airing its first-ever TV commercial. It is so interesting to me to see the moral voice of business leaders rising clearer and louder than ever before. When I met with Chouinard you could see how heartsick he was about the state of our world's response to climate change, species loss, and quality of our biophilia. His heart was wide open and his mastery of the detailed facts--both politically and ecologically--was inspiring. So authentic. Such a role model.Such a good business leader. 
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Ikigai: A Japanese concept to improve work and life and organizations

Ikigai: A Japanese concept to improve work and life and organizations | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
To those in the West who are more familiar with the concept of ikigai, it’s often associated with a Venn diagram with four overlapping qualities: what you love, what you are good at, what the world needs, and what you can be paid for.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
What is at the intersection of what you love, what you are good at, what the world is calling out for, and what you can be paid for? In Japan its called Ikigai: and its a concept that can guide the growth of individual well-being and help take a more strategic view of enterprise wide flourishing. As noted by Kyle Westaway notes in his briefing, " with no direct English translation, ikigai is a Japanese term that embodies the idea of happiness in living. Essentially, ikigai is the reason why you get up in the morning. To those in the West who are more familiar with the concept of ikigai, it’s often associated with a Venn diagram with four overlapping qualities: what you love, what you are good at, what the world needs, and what you can be paid for. Ikigai is what allows you to look forward to the future even if you’re miserable right now. It’s about feeling your work makes a difference in people’s lives. But this isn’t necessarily limited to your career. In fact, in a survey of 2,000 Japanese men and women conducted by Central Research Services in 2010, just 31% of recipients considered work as their ikigai. Someone’s value in life can be work – but is certainly not limited to that. Knowing your ikigai alone is not enough. Simply put, you need an outlet. Ikigai is “purpose in action.” Learn more at the BBC (9 minutes)."
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Millennials are Investing With a Purpose, and It's Changing Wealth Management

Millennials are Investing With a Purpose, and It's Changing Wealth Management | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Money put towards 'causes' has increased 33% in just two years to $8.7 trillion. See why sustainable investing has gone mainstream in today's chart.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Summing up the infographic is easy: Over the last decade or so, states recent research from Morgan Stanley, the amount of assets under management for sustainable investments has ballooned to $8.72 trillion in the U.S. during 2016 and 86% of millennials want to invest in companies committed to social, environmental, and economic value creation. And with a $30 trillion wealth transfer coming to millennials over the coming decades, this preference of using investments as a vehicle for creating positive change is more than just an interesting trend; it’s a powerful trajectory. Why is sustainable investing so popular among millennials? Here’s a rundown, mostly coming from recent research from Morgan Stanley: •1-- Millennials are putting money in sustainable investments at a rate 2x higher than average. • 2-- 86% of millennial investors say they are “very interested” or “interested” in sustainable investing. 3--  61% have made at least one sustainable investment action in the last year. 4--  75% think their investments can influence climate change, 5-- and finally, 84% think their investments can help fight poverty.
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Both of the President's Business Advisory Councils are Abandoned--CEO's Taking a Moral Stand is a Big Story

Both of the President's Business Advisory Councils are Abandoned--CEO's Taking a Moral Stand is a Big Story | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
"We cannot sit on a council for a President who tolerates bigotry and domestic terrorism," the organization said in a statement. "President Trump's remarks today repudiate his forced remarks yesterday about the KKK and neo-Nazis. We must resign on behalf of America's working people, who reject all notions of legitimacy of these bigoted groups."
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
One after another we witnessed top CEO's--from GE's Jeff Immelt to Tesla's Elon Musk and many more--resign from Trump's two business advisory councils. Now the councils, both of them, are abolished completely. Two main reasons for resigning from the councils have been cited. The first was Trump's decision to renege on America's promise to take part in the Paris agreements. Many business leaders saw that as a bad business move economically, and morally. The second reason was Trump's response to Charlottesville. Inge Thulin, of 3M, is a perfect example where both issues forced him to take a stand: "Sustainability, diversity and inclusion are my personal values and also fundamental to the 3M Vision. The past few months have provided me with an opportunity to reflect upon my commitment to these values. "I joined the Manufacturing Jobs Initiative in January to advocate for policies that align with our values and encourage even stronger investment and job growth – in order to make the United States stronger, healthier and more prosperous for all people. After careful consideration, I believe the initiative is no longer an effective vehicle for 3M to advance these goals. As a result, today I am resigning from the Manufacturing Advisory Council. "At 3M, we will continue to champion an environment that supports sustainability, diversity and inclusion. I am committed to building a company that improves lives in every corner of the world." There is so much to learn from this historic case and I'm sure its going to ignite timely, vital, and much needed inquiry into values-based leadership, and its relationship to good business, in hundreds and hundreds of business schools around the world... http://cvdl.ben.edu/education/doctoral-program/
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Storing clean energy in salt isn’t as crazy as it sounds

Storing clean energy in salt isn’t as crazy as it sounds | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Alphabet, Google’s parent company, is developing tech to solve our clean energy storage dilemma.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Companies like Alphabet are leading the large scale R+D for sustainability innovations that could be game changing for the spread of renewable, clean energy. Alphabet's X research lab is developing a cutting-edge molten salt technology that aims to store wind and solar power for longer periods of time and for less cost than the giant lithium-ion batteries Tesla and other companies are designing. Electricity storage is totally critical to the expansion of renewables in the U.S. to help fight climate change and wean the U.S. away from electric power plants that use fossil fuel.
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Just 100 companies responsible for 71% of global emissions, While Apple, IKEA, Google eye 100% Renewable

Just 100 companies responsible for 71% of global emissions, While Apple, IKEA, Google eye 100% Renewable | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
A relatively small number of fossil fuel producers and their investors could hold the key to tackling climate change
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
There is a “growing wave of companies that are acting in the opposite manner to the companies in this report,” says Brune. Nearly 100 companies including Apple, Facebook, Google and Ikea have committed to 100% renewable power under the RE100 initiative. Volvo recently announced that all its cars would be electric or hybrid from 2019.
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Loving Nature & Innovation-inspired Change

Loving Nature & Innovation-inspired Change | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Nature, through evolution, has been solving problems for billions of years. Now, it could help us to solve some of the most pressing global challenges.
Via Janine Benyus
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
What I love about biomimicry is that it teaches a new theory of change. It's about change inspired by innovation. We often teach that people resist change. Biomimicry models something totally different. It shows scientists, designers, and innovators alive and joyful, growing and elevating their sense of the possible. The fact is people thrive in change. Sitting in on a Jennie Benyus lecture is like a spiritual feast. Perhaps it's the reverence for life. Perhaps it's the analogous storytelling. Perhaps it's the curiosity that's unleashed. Let’s ratchet that up a notch. What if we built a city that worked like an ecosystem? Porous pavements evacuate rainwater, while bioluminescent trees light buildings made of self-healing concrete. Electric cars, powered by renewable energy drive around parks where pollution is captured by smog vacuum cleaners to ensure clean air is available to all. These innovations exist. These cities have the potential to exist. Yes: change can be fun.
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The Dutch Have Solutions to Rising Seas. The World Is Watching.

The Dutch Have Solutions to Rising Seas. The World Is Watching. | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
In the waterlogged Netherlands, climate change is considered neither a hypothetical nor a drag on the economy. Instead, it’s an opportunity.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Every global issue is an opportunity for despair or innovation. Take the Netherlands. Being largely under sea level in a world of rising seas is a reality. There is no room for denial and it is a force to big to fight off with big walls. The innovation? It is, in essence, to let water in, where possible, not hope to subdue Mother Nature: to live with the water, rather than struggle to defeat it. The Dutch devise lakes, garages, parks and plazas that are a boon to daily life but also double as enormous reservoirs for when the seas and rivers spill over. You may wish to pretend that rising seas are a hoax perpetrated by scientists and a gullible news media. Or you can build barriers galore. But in the end, neither will provide adequate defense, the Dutch say. And what holds true for managing climate change applies to the social fabric, too. Environmental and social resilience should go hand in hand, officials here believe, improving neighborhoods, spreading equity and taming water during catastrophes. Climate adaptation, if addressed head-on and properly, ought to yield a stronger, more inclusive and equitable, resilient, and richer nation.
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How Elon Musk Proved That Thought Leadership Is The New Patriotism

How Elon Musk Proved That Thought Leadership Is The New Patriotism | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Taking a stance is scary, that’s for sure. It’s hard to shake off that old idiom: “Don’t rock the boat.” But data shows that visionary, change-oriented leadership—often called “transformational leadership”—doesn’t just sound inspiring in bus-side advertisements, but it gets results.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
A few months ago, almost the minute Trump pulled the US out of the world's Paris agreements, Elon Musk tweeted that he himself would no longer participate on the President's business advisory council. But more than that, he tweeted that denying climate change is simply wrong. I spoke to Elon's employees soon after and it was clear that this leader spoke to their hearts, minds, and purposes. They were on fire. One associate in Amsterdam said "this is my job"--"my job is to electrify the renewable energy age." A new report from the global public relations firm Weber Shandwick and KRC Research surveyed Americans on how they feel about “CEO activism”. 56% of millennials said CEOs and other business leaders need to engage on hotly debated current issues more today than in the past, compared with just 36 percent of Gen Xers and 35 percent of baby boomers. 47% of millennials said CEOs have a responsibility to speak up on social issues that are important to society, compared with just 28 percent of Americans in older generations. And millennials were the only generation who view CEOs more favorably for taking public positions actually expanded since last year, rather than declined.

This article in Forbes speaks about how years ago this kind of stance--especially for an early stage startup company would be almost unheard of.  Taking a stance is scary, that’s for sure. It’s hard to shake off that old idiom: “Don’t rock the boat.” But data shows that visionary, change-oriented leadership—often called “transformational leadership”—doesn’t just sound inspiring in bus-side advertisements, but it gets results. A 2009 study from the Journal of Business Research found that transformational leadership increased employees’ creativity. These studies show visionary leadership increased job satisfaction, productivity, and organizational commitment among employees. Want more? A 2008 study from the Journal of Applied Psychology discovered that transformational leaders were more effective at getting their followers to commit to a particular change initiative, especially when the change had some sort of personal impact, than non-transformational leaders were. It turns out that passion is hard to fake. But when it is real, people will follow with zest and enthusiasm. Genuine thought leadership is not about branding - it’s about courage.
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Google’s Quest To Develop A Plant-Based “Power Dish” More Popular Than Meat

Google’s Quest To Develop A Plant-Based “Power Dish” More Popular Than Meat | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
In an attempt to reduce the company’s carbon footprint, Google is making changes to the food it serves its employees: everything from blending burgers with mushrooms to a data-driven quest to create the most delicious vegan taco.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
I loved it the last time I visited at the Google campus. Part of my visit--with Chade Meng Tan--was to see and understand all of the well-being and human flourishing initiatives, including wonderful hiking trails, life-planning, meditation, etc. This year, shares the Optimist Daily and Fast Company, the company will hit its goal of purchasing 100 percent renewable energy to run its operations--and people love this leadership. Google also recognizes that meat consumption is an important part of its carbon footprint. That’s why many attempts are made to bring down the meat consumption at the company’s headquarters in Sunnyvale. Google chefs are developing a plant-based “power dish” more popular than meat. The chefs aim that their efforts will ultimately serve not just Googlers but restaurants across the country. Their recipes will be available for anyone to use on World Resources Institute’s website in September. nWhen I was in their restaurants I was also inspired by how much design thinking goes into the conscious design of the interaction spaces, and how easy and attractive they make it to actually choose a more nutritarian (nutrient dense or high nutrients per calorie) diet. Imagine if we could take the best of the best at Google and connect and combine all that with the best of the best at Reebok ("be more human") and hundreds of other companies all pioneering with more positive organizing in their own ways! 
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Business Experiments Reinforce Benefits of a 100% Human Workplace 

Business Experiments Reinforce Benefits of a 100% Human Workplace  | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
A team of colleagues helping to take care of your baby is not a perk you find in most offices. At The Muse, however, it’s the norm. Recognizing the tough transition back from parental leave, the career guidance company launched a Bring Your Baby to Work program. Employees can bring their child into the office …
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Tiny interventions--from open hiring to energy bursts and cooperative childcare-- can bring about the more fully human organization. The experiments and initiatives explored in this collection give living proof to the idea that a 100% human workplace allows employees and, in turn, business to grow and succeed. The 100% Human Network’s continued experimentation furthers the future of work, where businesses prioritize people and community.
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Thinking (and feeling) like an Elon Musk

Thinking (and feeling) like an Elon Musk | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
In conversation with TED's Head Curator Chris Anderson, serial entrepreneur and future-builder Elon Musk discusses his new project digging tunnels under LA, the Hyperloop, Tesla, SpaceX and his dreams for what the world could look like.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Elon Musk says his goal--to accelerate the future of renewable energy--is not because he is trying to be a savior, but rather, when he looks into the future "I don't want to be sad." There is a heartsickness we all feel about what we are doing, and the antidote to even quiet despair is action, positive action. That's why people like Elon Musk come alive in entrepreneurship involving the greatest global challenges of our day, and turning them into business opportunities. Sustainable energy will happen no matter what, out of necessity, Musk says. “If you don’t have sustainable energy, you have unsustainable energy … "The fundamental value of a company like Tesla is the degree to which it accelerates the advent of sustainable energy faster than it would otherwise occur,” he says.
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Volvo Cars to go all electric

Volvo Cars to go all electric | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Volvo Cars, the premium car maker, has announced that every Volvo it launches from 2019 will have an electric motor, marking the historic end of cars that only have an internal combustion engine (ICE) and placing electrification at the core of its future business.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
As the movement to 100% renewable energy grows each day, the auto industry is seeing the future.  "Electric vehicles (EVs)" shares Peter Diamandis "are taking the transportation industry by storm." Within the next two decades, EVs will undoubtedly be the cheapest and most widely used vehicles on the market. Because EVs are inherently simpler devices, only possessing 10% of the moving parts of gas-powered engined vehicles, they're cheaper to build and cheaper to maintain. Volvo is an excellent case study to watch, as it's a traditional automotive player that acknowledges the coming changes in the auto industry, and is aggressively investing into an all-electric future
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Sustainability Leaders Could Be at the forefront of the Fourth Industrial Revolution

Sustainability Leaders Could Be at the forefront of the Fourth Industrial Revolution | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Corporate sustainability leaders can turn challenges into opportunities for society and companies alike.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
By building foresight, cultures of innovation in all aspects of sustainable value creation, cultivating whole systems collaboration, and harnessing the power of meaning, sustainability brands and leaders could be at the forefront of the next episode of a caring capitalism. Take for example the need for Workforce education and the challenges from losing jobs to gaining meaning. According to some estimates, 50 percent of jobs in Europe and the United States will be lost due to digitalization. Fast-paced technology developments mean that many employees need retrain continuously to stay proficient as their jobs evolve, or to learn new skills. Yet current education systems (including workforce development) are not prepared to meet such demands. According to May 2017 McKinsey Global Institute report, 60 percent of companies report they cannot find graduates with the right skills. At the same time, almost 40 percent of employees feel their jobs do not match their skills. Sustainability managers of the future can help here as well, not only by making sure that employees receive programming or math skills training, but also by ensuring that employees are engaged in purpose at work. “The outcome we strive for,” said Philippe Forestier, executive vice president of global affairs and communities at Dassault Systèmes, “is the employee who is happy in his or her personal and family life and powerful at work.” Ultimately, and ideally, sustainability managers can take the lead in helping their organizations partner with educators to shape curricula. And to give work meaning, they can encourage employees to rethink the purpose of the company and their individual roles. OSRAM, for example, now ventures beyond its traditional efficiency improvement goals to think more about its role in improving safety and nutrition. And adidas and Parley for the Oceans have both developed shoes made of ocean debris. As Philipp Meister, adidas’ director of strategy for social and environmental affairs, noted during a discussion, “Connecting recycling plastics with dying oceans really resonated with people and created an emotional link." Just think how important this is: A million plastic bottles are bought around the world every minute and the number will jump another 20% by 2021, and only half are recycled. Every social and global issue is a business opportunity to do good and do well.
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Dan Goleman: Mindfulness, the Dalai Lama, and How Business Can Be a Force for Good

Dan Goleman: Mindfulness, the Dalai Lama, and How Business Can Be a Force for Good | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
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David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Here is a rich interview for leadership development that features companies such as Greyston-- see http://greyston.com/  ;   .... Dan Goleman is prolific and internationally known for his leadership work in emotional intelligence with colleagues such as Richard Boyatzis. Working as a science journalist, Goleman reported on the brain and behavioral sciences for The New York Times for many years.  This interview has lots to offer including: (1) a description and definition of emotional intelligence as comprised of four parts: self-awareness, self-management, empathy, & relationship skills (2) How mindfulness meditation and emotional intelligence are important for cultivating leadership that is more present and how the kind of person you are as you lead matters; (3) A winning combination for leadership: mindfulness, emotional intelligence, and values (4) Greystone Bakery as a shining example of using business as a force for good; (4) The driving principles advocated by the Dalai Lama in the vision expressed through one of Daniel’s newer books and how education is key; (5) The need for widespread education and competency development in systems thinking that’s rooted in empathy and compassion  and (6) How the news skews our view of what’s really going on in the world
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Stop scaring people about climate change. It so often does not work. Innovation feeds on inspiration, hope, and joy.

Stop scaring people about climate change. It so often does not work. Innovation feeds on inspiration, hope, and joy. | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Heat death. The end of food. Unbreathable air. Perpetual war.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
I am beginning think, now more than ever, choosing and voicing optimism is a powerful political action. Optimism is political. Entrenched interests use despair, confusion and apathy to prevent change--think, for example, the early tobacco lobby. They encourage modes of deficit discourse which lead us to believe that problems are insolvable, that nothing we do can matter, that the issue is too complex to present even the opportunity for change. These are some of the ideas explored in this interesting article—and I especially like the web-links offered in this article in Grist. The links in the article show  studies on how despair lowers the probabilities of solution focused action and they suggest that Love, Not Fear, Will Help Us Fix Climate Change… As one physician—Dean Ornish proposes--fear is not a sustainable motivator—in health or in politics. In the short run, fear is powerful, it gets our attention. It activates a primal part of our brain, the amygdyla, that helps us survive a short-term crisis (e.g., the proverbial saber-toothed tiger jumping out in front of us). In the long run, though, it's too scary to think that something really bad may happen to us, so we usually don't, at least not for long. The human mortality rate is still 100%—one per person—but it's not something most people think about very often. Until something bad happens, but, even then, only for a short while. Scientists often expect fear of climate change will motivate public support of climate policies. Studies are now suggesting the opposite: that climate change deniers don’t respond to this, but that positive appeals and positive pathways can in fact change their views. In our work on “the new change equation” Lindsey Godwin and I are exploring how elevated views and experiences—think about the awe of astronauts seeing (and felling) the miracle of life on this planet and how many of their lives changed toward more altruism after experiencing “the overview effect”—it's about how conscious and co-elevationary experiences and dialogues can overpower deficit defeatism and energy depleting despair.
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Reasons to be cheerful: a full switch to low-carbon energy is in sight

Reasons to be cheerful: a full switch to low-carbon energy is in sight | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Climate change optimism is justified – a complete transition from carbon to solar and wind power looks practical and affordable within a generation
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Chris Goodall proposes that optimism about successfully tackling climate change has never been more justified because 2016 was the year in which it finally became obvious that the world had the technology, the business entrepreneurs, and people who care to solve the problem. Even as the political environment has darkened, the reasons have strengthened for believing that a complete transition to low-carbon energy is practical and affordable within one generation. Andrew Simms is right that global temperatures will probably overshoot the 2C target. But that makes the urgency of an energy transition even clearer. Despair is no excuse for inaction. Good action is the only antidote to despair. Solar power costs around the world fell by an average of another 15% in 2016, meaning that electricity from the sun became the cheapest form of energy generation in places as diverse as Chile, parts of the Middle East and the south-west of the US. The world saw the lowest-ever auction price for solar electricity in Abu Dhabi.
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'We are all entrepreneurs': Muhammad Yunus on changing the world, one microloan at a time

'We are all entrepreneurs': Muhammad Yunus on changing the world, one microloan at a time | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
The Nobel peace prize laureate will be in Australia to discuss why fostering entrepreneurship is even more important in the age of automation
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
The Grameen Bank, created by Nobel Laureate Muhammad Yunus today has nine million borrowers, 97% of them women. “They own the bank. It is a bank owned by poor women,” he says. “The repayment rate is 99.6%, and it has never fallen below that in our eight years of experience.” Part of his expansion into rich countries includes a program in the US: 19 branches in 11 cities, including eight in New York. “We have nearly 100,000 borrowers there now and 100% women. Not a single man.” Globalisation and the technological revolution may make Yunus’s theory timelier than even he expected when he began. Globalisation has sent manufacturing from rich countries to poor, and robots will eventually kill many of those jobs too as corporations seek to minimise costs and maximise profits. In rich countries, jobs are more precarious, people no longer expect the security of a job for life, and welfare is rapidly being reduced by the vogue for austerity economics.
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Finally, a breakthrough alternative to growth economics – the doughnut--prosperity and a flourishing world

Finally, a breakthrough alternative to growth economics – the doughnut--prosperity and a flourishing world | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Instead of growth at all costs, a new economic model allows us to thrive while saving the planet
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
In Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist, Kate Raworth of Oxford University’s Environmental Change Institute reminds us that economic growth was not, at first, intended to signify wellbeing. Simon Kuznets, who standardised the measurement of growth, warned: “The welfare of a nation can scarcely be inferred from a measure of national income.” Economic growth, he pointed out, measured only annual flow, rather than stocks of wealth and their distribution.
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The Getting Better Hypothesis and the Role of Good Business for the Next Stage of Getting Better

The Getting Better Hypothesis and the Role of Good Business for the Next Stage of Getting Better | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
The headlines have never been worse. But an increasingly influential group of thinkers insists that humankind has never had it so good. Does acknowledging good news hold us back from more advance or does our current news of pessimism hold us back? Lots of food for thought.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
In December, in an article headlined “Never forget that we live in the best of times”, the Times columnist Philip Collins provided an end-of-year summary of reasons to be hopeful: during 2016, he noted, the proportion of the world’s population living in extreme poverty had fallen below 10% for the first time; global carbon emissions from fossil fuels had failed to rise for the third year running; the death penalty had been ruled illegal in more than half of all countries....and Collins and others have been arguing that the story that things are getting worse and worse only works if your attention is stuck in the barrage of current day media. The story is totally different if you look at the longer time periods. In 1993 almost 2 billion people were living their lives in extreme grinding poverty. In just 18 years, that number is cut in half. By 2030 only 4% of people globally are expected to be living in extreme poverty. Or take life expectancy. In Japan for example, in 1900 life expectancy was not even forty years. Today it's over 80. How about education? In 1800 4 out of 5 people has no schooling. Over the last two centuries this number has flipped: today 90% have schooling. The waning of war, is another amazing story. See www.fallen.io/ww2. How did all these remarkable changes come about? See also The Pursuit of Human Well-Being: The Untold Story at https://www.amazon.com/Pursuit-Human-Well-Being-Quality-Life/dp/3319391003
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From Trash to Treasure--it requires blue ocean strategy

From Trash to Treasure--it requires blue ocean strategy | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
How Sweden's recycling revolution is creating a blue ocean.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
An example of blue ocean strategy--this article demonstrates waste to wealth mindsets and the power of collective intention. Sweden imports garbage. And in terms of its own waste, Only one percent of Sweden’s rubbish is sent to landfills. Another 52 percent is converted into energy and the remaining 47 percent gets recycled. The amount of energy generated from waste alone provides heating to one million homes and electricity to 250,000. Meanwhile, the UK recycles just 44 percent of its waste. So how do the Swedes do it? Well, first of all, Sweden was quick to identify a growing demand. They understood early on that resource scarcity and climate change are both irreversible trends with clear trajectories. By looking at these trends from the right perspective – namely, drawing insights into how these trends will change value to customers and impact the country over time — Sweden was able to seize a blue ocean opportunity. The first efforts to convert waste to energy began as early as the mid-20th century with the implementation overtime of a cohesive national recycling policy. This boosted recycling rates and placed the nation as a global leader in recycling. By converting its waste into energy, Sweden has reduced its carbon dioxide emissions by 2.2 million tonnes a year. Between 1990 and 2006, carbon dioxide emissions went down by 34 percent, and greenhouse gas emissions are projected to fall by 76 percent by 2020, compared to levels in 1990. It's also importing garbage from neighboring countries and making $100 millions...dollars that can support education, social programs, and other national priorities. Every management class can benefit from this case study!
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We Can Pave Miles and Miles of Roads With Solar Panels

We Can Pave Miles and Miles of Roads With Solar Panels | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Scott and Julie Brusaw are working to replace more asphalt with solar cells—and possibly link the panels up with driverless cars.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
We all know--from Alfred North Whitehead's little classic "Adventure in Ideas"-- that one idea can change the world. That why I love to read this National Geographic series called "Chasing Genius." In this article, Scott and Julie Brusaw display the creative confidence and courage of bold innovators inspired by a greater Purpose. Here is part of the inspiring interview: Scott: In the beginning, when it was just an idea, half the people thought we were crazy and half the people thought we were genius. The first complaints were, you can't drive on glass, because the first time it rains everybody will slide off the road, which would be true if you didn't have traction. But we put traction on the glass. Then they said, it will never withstand the weight of a truck. We had it load-tested, and it will withstand a 250,000-pound truck, which is over three times the legal limit on our highways. So they dropped that argument. Slowly but surely, every time they'd come up with a new reason it won't work, we would prove it did work. The only one they've got left is the price. That's what we're working on—that's the last hurdle to get across. That's what mass manufacturing will do for us. What advice would you give to others who are pursuing their own big ideas? Scott: Just don't give up. Skeptics aren't something new. I just finished reading a book on the Wright brothers. They flew their airplane in 1903. The local newspapers were ridiculing them, saying, these crazy guys are going to kill themselves. Even Wilbur got so upset in 1902 [after] they crashed their glider, he told his brother, no man will ever fly for a thousand years. The very next year, they flew. Everybody's telling you you can't do something: If you start listening to that, you'll stop. But you've got to believe in what you're doing.
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Stop Using the Excuse “Organizational Change Is Hard”

Stop Using the Excuse “Organizational Change Is Hard” | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
“ In organizational change initiatives, our negative biases can create a toxic self-fulfilling prophecy. When a change project falls a day behind schedule, if leaders and employees believe that successful change is an unlikely outcome, they will regard this momentary setback as the dead canary in the coalmine of their change initiative. (Never mind the fact that three other initiatives are still on time or ahead of schedule.) Suddenly, employees disengage en masse and then the change engine begins to sputter in both perception and reality.”
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
During nearly every discussion about organizational change, someone makes the obvious assertion that “change is hard.” Indeed the field of Organization Development historically relied on a formula for change that asserts "people resist change." On the surface, this is true: change requires effort. But the problem with this attitude, which permeates all levels of our organizations, is that it equates “hard” with “failure,” and, by doing so, it hobbles our change initiatives, which have higher success rates than we lead ourselves to believe. Our biases toward failure is wired into our brains. In a recently published series of studies, University of Chicago researchers Ed O’Brien and Nadav Klein found that we assume that failure is a more likely outcome than success, and, as a result, we wrongly treat successful outcomes as flukes and bad results as irrefutable proof that change is difficult.
Our focus in Appreciative Inquiry leads to a different question: when do people and organizations thrive in transition? Results of A recent dissertation by Victoria Woo at Case Western Reserve University will be published soon, and the answers shed light on when and why people love change! For example did you ever see the moment an infant for the very first time pulled themselves up on their own two feet in their crib. I did when Daniel our first son did--and he was smiling, squealing with delight. When have you seen a change process where people are filled with delight?
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The Past Is Prologue: Accelerating the Energy Revolution

The Past Is Prologue: Accelerating the Energy Revolution | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
The Past Is Prologue
35 years of impact have set the stage for accelerating the energy revolution
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
In 2015, the world used energy 32 percent more efficiently than 25 years earlier, even while the world economy more than doubled in size, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. And globally, renewables have been the leading new energy source for two years in a row, at decreasing cost. Could it be that when markets lead, policy and politics follow? That's the thesis explored here by the head of the Rocky Mountain Institute, as they have been a tireless advocate of this perspective.  
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Panda Power to Elevate Green Energy Mindsets Among Kids and Young Entrepreneurs

Panda Power to Elevate Green Energy Mindsets Among Kids and Young Entrepreneurs | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
The first phase of Panda Green Energy's Panda Power Plant in Datong, China was recently connected to the grid.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
TO PEOPLE who believe that the world used to be a better place, and especially to those who argue that globalisation has done more economic harm than good, there is a simple, powerful riposte: In 1981 some 42% of the world’s population were extremely poor, according to the World Bank, and reported in The Economist. They were not just poorer than a large majority of their compatriots, as many rich countries define poverty among their own citizens today, but absolutely destitute. At best, they had barely enough money to eat and pay for necessities like clothes. At worst, they starved. Since then the number of people in absolute poverty has fallen by about 1bn and the number of non-poor people has gone up by roughly 4bn. By 2013, the most recent year for which reliable data exist, just 10.7% of the world’s population was poor (the modern yardstick for destitution is that a person consumes less than $1.90 a day at 2011 purchasing-power parity). Poverty has almost certainly retreated further since 2013: the World Bank’s estimate for 2016 is 9.1%. Homi Kharas of the Brookings Institution, a think-tank, calculates that someone escapes extreme poverty every 1.2 seconds. Now, the question is this: why am I placing these observations on poverty reduction in relationship to a story about a new solar array in China? Part of the reason is that China has been one of the success stories in poverty reduction, and is now leading the world in clean, renewable energy investment. China's poverty rate fell from 88% in 1981, to less than 6% today. And now the latest Global Status report from the Renewable Energy Policy Network (REN21) shows China leading the world in the solar boom: last year China contributed almost half the additions to global solar capacity, and it appears that they are educating the next generation to magnify this momentum. Yes this Panda solar array might at first blush look a bit like a cute public relations act. But it's part of a fascinating story of big change and transformation, happening fast--just what the world needs more of, as we seek to mobilize around our Paris agreements and global goals.
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