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GECA and Banksia Foundation create new award for product sustainability

GECA and Banksia Foundation create new award for product sustainability | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
“Good Environmental Choice Australia (GECA) has partnered with the Banksia Foundation to introduce a new award category in 2014.”
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:
I love this mini trend of sustainability awards popping up all over. Imagine if they had a combined, magnified voice--we need to get better and better at seeing the future not in the abstract but in actuality. The new award category, Product Sustainability through Design, Manufacture and Use Award recognises outstanding achievement in improving sustainability through the design, manufacture and commercial application of a product. In addition to new products, improvements in process or design that increase the sustainability of existing products will also be considered for the award. Read more at http://www.infolink.com.au/c/good-environmental-choice-australia-241907/geca-and-banksia-foundation-create-new-award-for-product-sustainability-n2507466#BAdtO6wJ7y2aFRfq.99
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Business as an Agent of World Benefit
Sustainable design; green economy; csr; sustainable development; Business as an Agent of World Benefit; Appreciative Inquiry; David Cooperrider; CSR
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Cities are the greatest hope for our planet

Cities are the greatest hope for our planet | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Of all the things people build, cities are the most important. 

Cities are the largest things we build, and most people now live in them. But that’s not why cities are our most important invention. 

Cities matter because they represent our greatest hope for long-term survival, not only for humans but for all species. They offer the best chance to dramatically reduce carbon pollution, provide shelter and community for the world’s growing human population, and protect rural habitat for species in decline. 

But to make this hope a reality, we must recognize that cities — and people — are part of nature and subject to the same laws as the rest of nature. 

For too long we have ignored the relationships between built and natural environments. Economic development has focused on “taming the wilderness” with technology. And while the “wilderness” is strikingly diverse, urban technology has been disturbingly monocultural. 
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

I love this article by Denis Hayes, President of the Bullitt Foundation. Could it be that of all the "things" that people build, cities are the most important? And I agree:

 

Cities are the largest things we build, and most people now live in them. But that’s not why cities are our most important invention. 

Cities matter because they represent our greatest hope for long-term survival, not only for humans but for all species. They offer the best chance to dramatically reduce carbon pollution, provide shelter and community for the world’s growing human population, and protect rural habitat for species in decline. 


But to make this hope a reality, we must recognize that cities — and people — are part of nature and subject to the same laws as the rest of nature. 


For too long we have ignored the relationships between built and natural environments. Economic development has focused on “taming the wilderness” with technology. And while the “wilderness” is strikingly diverse, urban technology has been disturbingly monocultural. 

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Michael Plishka's curator insight, December 18, 2:52 AM

I've also blogged about the fact that governments and peoples have created these dichotomies and reinforce them. I call it the "Sacred Space Paradox." http://zenstorming.wordpress.com/2010/07/08/ecologically-sustainable-design-sacred-space-paradox/ ;

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Smart textiles and digital fashion: How about just one dress...but lots of digital patterns?

Smart textiles and digital fashion: How about just one dress...but lots of digital patterns? | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Francesca Rosella of CuteCircuit claims advances in "smart" fabrics will allow us to download new styles for our clothes rather than buying new garments.
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

Design thinking is changing the world and the world of fashion too. Imagine just one thing in your wardrobe...but it can become 1,000s of styles, just by changing the software. Now this is a stylish approach to de-materialization.

 

This article says: "Instead of 10,000 skirts, for example. we could sell 500 skirts, but then could sell thousands of patterns that you download to your skirt."

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Hydro Heaven: A New Eco Friendly Quadrofoil--Sustainability as Enchanting Experience

Hydro Heaven: A New Eco Friendly Quadrofoil--Sustainability as Enchanting Experience | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
“eco friendly quadrofoil, eco friendly water vehicles, eco friendly jetski,”
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:
Zero Emissions and Enchantingly Designed: Luckily for insects though (and birds, and fish, and other wildlife that lives on, in or near the water) the watercraft operates quietly and doesn’t produce any waves or emissions, which makes it suitable for lakes, rivers—even in marine protected areas, where most motor boats and personal watercrafts are prohibited. - See more at: http://eluxemagazine.com/homestech/eco-friendly-quadrofoil/#sthash.1cAC4uGN.dpuf
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The Greenest Companies Consistently Outperform Markets

“Apple, BMW, LG, HP, Coca-Cola, and Walmart are among the 187 companies cited by non-profit Carbon Disclosure Project for doing the most to combat climate change.”
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:
Bloomberg: “If acting on climate change hurts the economy, as the American Coal Council’s talking points suggest, it’s a lesson lost on some of the world’s most successful companies. Stocks of companies that take climate change seriously beat the wider market by almost 10 percent …” Forbes: “True leaders in the field are using their sustainability information to become stronger businesses and to make better decisions based on what they have learned. They understand that analysing, reporting and benchmarking the data they have gathered can help to boost revenues, strengthen brands, cut costs and manage risks.”
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Net Positive Energy and 9 innovations to slash food loss

Net Positive Energy and 9 innovations to slash food loss | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Using anaerobic digestion to turn food waste into energy

A firm called Feed Resource Recovery has designed and implemented a zero-waste solution for the food industry that leverages customers’ existing transportation and distribution systems to generate clean, sustainable power for onsite operations — reducing emissions and saving millions of dollars on waste-removal costs. In nature, wetlands use anaerobic digestion to purify the earth’s wastewater. Feed uses this natural process, along with technology and optimization advancements, to cleanly and efficiently convert the carbon in organic waste into a renewable natural gas. This results in zero odors, a net surplus of energy and a nutrient-rich fertilizer. Similarly, a company called Waste Management, Inc. collects food scraps from restaurants, grocery stores, hotels and food processing plants, takes them to a company facility in Carson City, Nev., and grinds them into a slurry. That liquid is taken to a Los Angeles County wastewater treatment plant, where it is mixed in with sewage — one part food waste to nine parts human waste — and processed in an anaerobic digester. This results in a biogas that can be burned as fuel.
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

This article highlights 9 innovations. One of my favorites creates not only less harm but net surplus of clean energy. It Uses anaerobic digestion to turn food waste into energy...read on:


A firm called Feed Resource Recovery has designed and implemented a zero-waste solution for the food industry that leverages customers’ existing transportation and distribution systems to generate clean, sustainable power for onsite operations — reducing emissions and saving millions of dollars on waste-removal costs. In nature, wetlands use anaerobic digestion to purify the earth’s wastewater. Feed uses this natural process, along with technology and optimization advancements, to cleanly and efficiently convert the carbon in organic waste into a renewable natural gas. This results in zero odors, a net surplus of energy and a nutrient-rich fertilizer. Similarly, a company called Waste Management, Inc. collects food scraps from restaurants, grocery stores, hotels and food processing plants, takes them to a company facility in Carson City, Nev., and grinds them into a slurry. That liquid is taken to a Los Angeles County wastewater treatment plant, where it is mixed in with sewage — one part food waste to nine parts human waste — and processed in an anaerobic digester. This results in a biogas that can be burned as fuel.

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Climate change: Carbon trading edges closer as UN brokers deal

Climate change: Carbon trading edges closer as UN brokers deal | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
“The world is on the brink of enlisting market forces in the fight against climate change on a truly global scale for the first time, United Nations officials have claimed.”
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:
The world is longing for solutions, and guess where they are coming from? In almost every global summit over the past decade (for example Rio) the major progress has come from business leaders who are urging action. One of the leading voices is the Global a Compact's Georg Kell, representing 1000s of the world's largest corporations. Carbon trading is coming. Georg Kell, executive director of UN Global Compact, the body’s initiative to get firms to adopt sustainable policies, said the recent conversion of much of the business world was hugely significant. “This is a breakthrough as usually business blocks climate action on a national level,” he said yesterday. “For the first time, the private sector has argued in favour of pricing externalities. Polluters are making the case to be charged.”
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Plant-based wetsuits prove sustainability sells.

Plant-based wetsuits prove sustainability sells. | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
“It’s easy to find consumers who say they care about the environment. But how many are willing to pay more for products from companies that do the same?”
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:
Patagonia is a signal to the future. In 2011, the company broke every rule of merchandising by taking out a full-page Black Friday ad in the New York Times with the message, “DON’T BUY THIS JACKET.” The company urged customers not to buy its fleece jacket, and to recycle or buy used instead. Although the ad may have seemed counterintuitive, it actually highlighted the durability of costlier Patagonia jackets and clothing. Less than a year later, Patagonia’s “buy less” campaign increased the company’s sales by nearly a third, and Patagonia founder Yvon Chouinard estimated that revenue will keep growing about 15 percent a year. Two years later, Patagonia decided to push the envelope even further. It ran another ad last fall, this time featuring a shabby pair of 9-year-old swim trunks, with fabric from a beach umbrella patching up the rear, to promote sales of used clothes in some of its stores. And for Black Friday 2013, the company promoted its “Worn Wear” campaign as the antidote to holiday shopping frenzies by hosting parties in every store to celebrate the stuff customers already own. This is, after all, the company that makes wetsuits from plants, fleece jackets out of recycled bottles, and one of the first companies in California to switch to wind energy. Patagonia also donates one percent of its revenue to environmental causes.
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'Flourish and Prosper' Takes Sustainability to the Next Level

This week I had the chance to attend the Third Global Forum for Businesses as an Agent of World Benefit at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland.
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

This article by the Triple Pundit helps us see the next stage in sustainable value creation. Based on the new book by Chris Laszlo and the Fowler Center Distinguished Fellows, the conference set a new north star for the field. Here is what Siegal, the author, had to say about his experience:

 

"This week I had the opportunity to attend the Third Global Forum for Businesses as an Agent of World Benefit at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland. The theme for this year’s forum is ‘Flourish and Prosper.’ The event, which was pioneered eight years ago by David Cooperrider — best known for his work on appreciative inquiry.

As Barbara Snyder, Case Western president said, “We’ve come a long way from talking about sustainability to talking about flourishing.” That sentiment was repeated several times on this first day — that it is time to reach beyond merely sustaining, and time to stop thinking in terms of trade-offs. We need to be smart enough to include the considerations of people, profit and planet in everything we do, to synthesize these requirements into smart solutions.

There is another dimension to this, as well. The idea of flourishing, says Cooperrider, means that the energy for innovation must come from an intrinsic caring. It must acknowledge the interconnectedness of all things. Citing the Dalai Lama, when asked about corporate social responsibility (CSR), he said that ‘responsibility’ is not the right word. It’s intimacy. It’s time for a transformation that means moving away from a preoccupation with the self and focusing on the interconnectedness." 

 

 

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Business as an Agent of World Benefit - YouTube

Business is a powerful force for change in the world. Business as an Agent of World Benefit (BAWB) unites the best in business with the call of our times. At...
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

Last week, The Global Forum for Business as an Agent of World Benefit was a major success. Over 600 people from companies as diverse as Google and Unilever to Fairmount Santrol and Clarke Industries heard from Nobel Laureates and CEOs and entrepreneurs building a world that not just sustains or survives but flourishes and prospers. Based on the book by Laszlo and others called "The Flourishing Enterprise" people explored the practices, the mind shifts, and the cooperative advantages of aiming higher where doing good and doing well are so seamless that there is no tradeoff between the two.  

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Business Forum in Cleveland to Focus on Purpose Over Profit - The Good News Network

Business Forum in Cleveland to Focus on Purpose Over Profit - The Good News Network | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Call it flourishing. It’s a movement beyond traditional notions of corporate sustainability, demanding more than just doing less harm. The vision for flourishing companies builds on best practices toward a higher purpose than profits. It’s about creating a world where enterprises prosper, people excel, and nature thrives.

Business thought-leaders are joining together on October 15-17 to co-create these possibilities at the Third Global Forum For Business as an Agent of World Benefit. The theme for the gathering at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland is “Fourish and Prosper.”
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

This article sums up what we are up to at Case Western Reserve University:

 

"Call it flourishing. It’s a movement beyond traditional notions of corporate sustainability, demanding more than just doing less harm. The vision for flourishing companies builds on best practices toward a higher purpose than profits. It’s about creating a world where enterprises prosper, people excel, and nature thrives.

Business thought-leaders are joining together on October 15-17 to co-create these possibilities at the Third Global Forum For Business as an Agent of World Benefit. The theme for the gathering at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland is “Fourish and Prosper.”

 

sign up and join us--but do it quick--its next week!

globalforumbawb.com

 

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The audacious optimism of Climate Week

The audacious optimism of Climate Week | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
“Why is the private sector so gosh-darn positive about solving climate change?”
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:
The successes at the Un meetings, increasingly, are due to the can do, pragmatic, entrepreneurial capacities of business. The optimism also reflected the private sector’s innate sense of the possible, added Seabright. “Leaders in business tend to be fairly positive and aggressive and have an optimistic can-do spirit about what they can achieve, and then they set out the plans and execute against them. Sometimes they fail and they get up and they try another brand or another product and another. So I think there’s an inherent spirit of opportunity that underpins most business mentalities.” That sentiment was echoed by others. “Business is bullish,” observed Mindy Lubber, president of Ceres, who also directs the Investor Network on Climate Risk. “They’re seeing the problem. It’s hitting them in a very real way and they are can-do people. These are people who know how to make things happen.” Lubber was among the several I talked to who believed the positivity of this year’s Climate Week boded well for the U.N. climate talks in Paris at the end of 2015 — the next big opportunity for governments to come together to create the kind of global agreement that wasn’t possible in Copenhagen in 2009. Said Lubber: “We’re all optimistic that something is going to happen in the next 15 months. Something will happen.”
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'Inspiration, not just grim reality, needed to engage millennials on sustainability'

'Inspiration, not just grim reality, needed to engage millennials on sustainability' | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Jonathon Porritt: a new website launches Tuesday that we hope will help galvanize sustainable innovation
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:
In a tiny but powerful book on "Hope, Inspiration, and Joy" the brilliant author Verena Kast talks about the transformational power of those emotions when the are experienced deeply. Inspiration, not just grim reality is needed to reach our young people. So how about unconstrained excitement at the rising surge of brilliant organisations and people already crafting the solutions to today’s converging crises? We live in a remarkable time. That’s what plan is at collectively.org. The aim is to provide a dynamic showcase of technologies, campaigns and entrepreneurs for young people (18-30 years old) to participate in, celebrate, share and draw on to change their own lives and the lives of others. The premise is a very simple one: everything we need to co-create a sustainable world is already out there. The pace of innovation accelerates all the time. Investors are finally getting the hang of finding the right deals. Even mainstream media are waking up. So let’s get all that out there, in a way that resonates with young people today, so they can keep on celebrating the genius of the human spirit rather than having to turn away from all that is ugly and destructive about our current way of life.
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Love, Not Fear, Will Help Us Respond to Climate Change

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The Positive Energy of BHAQ's

The Positive Energy of BHAQ's | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Davide Oldani, chef at Ristorante D'O, thought it unfair that only wealthier people could afford top-quality food, while most Michelin-starred restaurants run at a loss. He wanted to create a restaurant with at least one Michelin star, aimed at 'the ordinary man', offering complete lunches and complete dinners for $25 and $45 respectively. The starred restaurant also had to be profitable. His restaurant is booked 1.5 years in advance, the ordinary man dines there, Davide makes a profit and has created an entirely new culinary movement called Cucina POP. 

The positive energy of impossible questions

Now you could say: "Such things are only reserved for a select group of brilliant entrepreneurs." But nothing could be further from the truth. I decided to see for myself and conducted an experiment. Whenever I had to deliver a workshop or speech, I started with one of the questions above. I outlined the situation of Dr. V. or Davide Oldani and presented the audience with impossible demands by asking them: “How would you tackle that?” It was amazing to witness what happened each time. There was an energetic, almost mischievous ambience in the room. The buzz increased and twenty or thirty ideas were soon proposed. Special, creative and enterprising ideas from enthusiastic people. It was very different when I asked the following question: "You have a Michelin-starred restaurant and are making a loss of around 10%. How are you going to resolve that? How will you reduce costs by 10%?" The answers to that question were just as boring and obligatory as the energy within the room. And the list of ideas was significantly shorter. 
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

We have all heard of BHAG's--big hairy audacious goals--but where do they come from? The true source is impossible questions--heretical questions--big hairy audacious questions. So more attention should be placed on creative questions, not the goals themselves. But it is not something we teach managers. This article shares great examples. Take Oldani...


Davide Oldani, chef at Ristorante D'O, thought it unfair that only wealthier people could afford top-quality food, while most Michelin-starred restaurants run at a loss. He wanted to create a restaurant with at least one Michelin star, aimed at 'the ordinary man', offering complete lunches and complete dinners for $25 and $45 respectively. The starred restaurant also had to be profitable. His restaurant is booked 1.5 years in advance, the ordinary man dines there, Davide makes a profit and has created an entirely new culinary movement called Cucina POP. 


The positive energy of impossible questions

Now you could say: "Such things are only reserved for a select group of brilliant entrepreneurs." But nothing could be further from the truth. The author of this article said: "I decided to see for myself and conducted an experiment. Whenever I had to deliver a workshop or speech, I started with one of the questions above. I outlined the situation of Dr. V. or Davide Oldani and presented the audience with impossible demands by asking them: “How would you tackle that?” It was amazing to witness what happened each time. There was an energetic, almost mischievous ambience in the room. The buzz increased and twenty or thirty ideas were soon proposed. Special, creative and enterprising ideas from enthusiastic people. It was very different when I asked the following question: "You have a Michelin-starred restaurant and are making a loss of around 10%. How are you going to resolve that? How will you reduce costs by 10%?" The answers to that question were just as boring and obligatory as the energy within the room.The list of ideas was significantly shorter. "

 


 

 

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First look: environmental entrepreneur Paul Hawken's long-awaited new book

First look: environmental entrepreneur Paul Hawken's long-awaited new book | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Project Drawdown will begin as a lavishly illustrated book and online database, to be released late next year. Its purpose is to re-frame the climate debate, by showing that solving the climate crisis will bring, not sacrifice, but “more security, more prosperity, more jobs, more well-being and better health,” Hawken said.

“Drawdown is about technologies and solutions that are in place, understood, measured, documented and growing,” Hawken told me by phone. “This is a path to opportunity and wellbeing, as opposed to a tax or a loss.”

Ordinarily, the announcement of a new book would not by itself be newsworthy, but Hawken has had so much influence over corporate sustainability in the US that his work merits attention. His books, The Ecology of Commerce and Natural Capitalism, the latter written with Amory Lovins and L Hunter Lovins, were among the first to point the way towards a sustainable global economy. He has advised CEOs at Ford, Walmart and Interface, the carpet company. At Greenbuild, which attracts 23,000 people, he’ll interview billionaire climate activist Tom Steyer and Maryland governor Martin O’Malley, key allies in the climate debate
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

Paul Hawken's new book is attracting lots of attention.

 

Project Drawdown will begin as a lavishly illustrated book and online database, to be released late next year. Its purpose is to re-frame the climate debate, by showing that solving the climate crisis will bring, not sacrifice, but “more security, more prosperity, more jobs, more well-being and better health,” Hawken said.

 

“Drawdown is about technologies and solutions that are in place, understood, measured, documented and growing,” Hawken told me by phone. “This is a path to opportunity and wellbeing, as opposed to a tax or a loss.”

 

Ordinarily, the announcement of a new book would not by itself be newsworthy, but Hawken has had so much influence over corporate sustainability in the US that his work merits attention. His books, The Ecology of Commerce and Natural Capitalism, the latter written with Amory Lovins and L Hunter Lovins, were among the first to point the way towards a sustainable global economy. He has advised CEOs at Ford, Walmart and Interface, the carpet company. At Greenbuild, which attracts 23,000 people, he’ll interview billionaire climate activist Tom Steyer and Maryland governor Martin O’Malley, key allies in the climate debate

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Apple’s Largest Data Center is Powered by 100% Renewable Energy: Do You Know Why?

Apple’s Largest Data Center is Powered by 100% Renewable Energy: Do You Know Why? | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
“Apple's Largest Data Center is Powered by 100% Renewable Energy | Inhabitat - Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building”
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Amory Lovins' high-tech home skimps on energy but not on comfort

Amory Lovins' high-tech home skimps on energy but not on comfort | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
The house’s electricity is all renewable. Massive solar panels adorn the roof, carport, and grounds alongside the building. The panels produce far more solar power during the day than the Lovinses use, so they sell electricity to the grid during the day and buy wind energy from the grid at night. They also store the solar power in batteries so that they could be fully self-sufficient in a blackout. The batteries would run down at night but be recharged during the day. “In February 2013, there were five power failures [in the area], and we never lost power,” says Lovins.
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

Amory Lovin's walks the talk when he argues that the transition to a renewable energy future is a sheer joy. Its about sustainability as enchanting enrichment.  His house’s electricity is all renewable. Massive solar panels adorn the roof, carport, and grounds alongside the building. The panels produce far more solar power during the day than the Lovinses use, so they sell electricity to the grid during the day and buy wind energy from the grid at night. They also store the solar power in batteries so that they could be fully self-sufficient in a blackout. The batteries would run down at night but be recharged during the day. “In February 2013, there were five power failures [in the area], and we never lost power,” says Lovins.

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In One Fell Swoop Obama Announces Solar Jobs For 50,000 Veterans and Takes On Climate Change

In One Fell Swoop Obama Announces Solar Jobs For 50,000 Veterans and Takes On Climate Change | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
“Since Republicans have relentlessly obstructed jobs programs for America's Veterans, the President took it upon himself to enact the program at American military bases and provide job training for at least 50,000 veterans.”
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:
Yesterday, in one fell swoop, the President took decisive action to address both job creation for Veterans and reducing carbon dioxide emissions. The White House announced that beginning this fall the United States will launch a six-year job training program for America’s Veterans in the growing solar panel installation industry. Since Republicans have relentlessly obstructed jobs programs for America’s Veterans, the President took it upon himself to enact the program at American military bases and provide job training for at least 50,000 veterans. It is training for about 50,000 more Veterans than Republicans have provided despite several proposals and requests by the President to help America’s fighting men and women returning from war.
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New climate time machine is not a DeLorean, but it’s almost as cool

New climate time machine is not a DeLorean, but it’s almost as cool | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
“If you could turn back time, would you kill Hitler? Sing to sailors while straddling a cannon? Of course you wouldn’t!”
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:
The new “time machine” makes public information that was previously only available to a handful of researchers. Developed with funding from the National Science Foundation, the software package is free, and opens up whole new worlds of possibility to climate researchers across the (mostly blue) globe.
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Clean-tech is good for the Canadian economy and environment

Clean-tech is good for the Canadian economy and environment | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
“Clean-tech may not be the answer to all our problems, but it's a sector that offers a lot of promise for our economy and environment.”
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:
According to Ottawa-based consultants Analytica Advisors, clean technology, or clean-tech, is Canada's fastest-growing industry. The firm's "2014 Canadian Clean Technology Report", found direct employment by clean-tech companies rose six per cent from 2011 to 2012, from 38,800 people to 41,000, with revenues increasing nine per cent to $11.3-billion. According to Industry Canada, mining and oil and gas sector revenues grew just 0.3 per cent in the same period, manufacturing 1.9 per cent and the construction industry 3.9 per cent. At the current growth rate, Analytica estimates Canada's clean-tech industry will be worth $28 billion by 2022. But with the global market expected to triple to $2.5 trillion over the next six years, Canada hasn't come close to reaching its potential. It's our choice to seize the opportunity. With just two per cent of the global market (matching our share of population), we could have a $50 billion clean-tech industry by 2020 — double the size of today's aerospace industry.
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Flourish & Prosper app

Flourish & Prosper app | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

Get the App for our 3rd Global Forum for Business as an Agent of World Benefit. Soon all of the talks and presentations will become available. 

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Frog Hollow Neighbourhood House takes the Dalai Lama Center’s teachings to heart

Frog Hollow Neighbourhood House takes the Dalai Lama Center’s teachings to heart | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
East Vancouver’s Frog Hollow Neighbourhood House has nurtured thousands of preschool-aged children and their families over the years with the goal of creating a caring community. What better place to start educating the hearts of children?
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

His Holiness the Dalai Lama is supporting thousands using Appreciative Inquiry in Canada. Dalai Lama who believes that "we all must make the effort to do positive things" has been engaged in Appreciative Inquiry projects with world religious interfaith efforts as well as dialogues with CEOs about "ethics for the new millennium. This time it is with positive education in schools. 


As this article cites, Frog Hollow is several years into its relationship with the Dalai Lama Center, the main outcome of which is a two-year appreciative inquiry called Compassionate Children, Caring Community that engaged more than 2,000 people from their surrounding community to share their experiences with compassion and their ideas about encouraging children to be more compassionate.


“People told their own stories about compassion and that turned out to be a really powerful experience for a lot of people, more than we ever could have imagined,” said Frog Hollow executive director Gary Dobbin. “They really wanted to share that and had thought hard about it and then people really connected with each other after talking about it.”


In addition to collecting hundreds of ideas for creating compassion and community, by pioneering the appreciative inquiry process Frog Hollow learned a great deal about how to engage with a far-flung community that is defined by the sheer range of ages, languages and incomes in East Vancouver’s polyglot. That is knowledge they can pass on to other communities as the Heart-Mind Index — recently pilot tested in six communities — rolls out across B.C.

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Climate change and circular economy take centre stage at Davos

Climate change and circular economy take centre stage at Davos | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
“After leading a design and sustainability workshop at this year's World Economic Forum, William McDonough reflects on why he is hopeful for sustainable change”
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:
WEF (World Economic Forum) and Ellen MacArthur Foundation offer hope for deep systemic change with Project Mainstream, an action plan for scaling up the circular economy. The first Project Mainstream report estimates that the transition to a circular economy would provide $1tn in annual savings by 2025 and create 100,000 new jobs within five years. Crucially, the circular economy provides an alternative to resource scarcity. We know it works. Cradle to Cradle, which I co-developed, is a combination of design and science and one of the sources of the circular economy model. By design, its two distinct material flows are safe and regenerative: biological materials are designed to be returned to nature, technical materials are designed for perpetual cycles of use by industry. Powered by renewable energy, fed by regenerative material flows, the circular economy is designed to decouple economic growth from resource consumption. Many companies have profitably engaged in the Cradle to Cradle certified programme. One of the things the programme does well is help companies extend their values and material health goals throughout their supply chains, which is crucial for making a successful transition to the circular economy. By targeting signature material stocks and ambitiously cultivating a multi-stakeholder community of circular economy champions, the WEF and Ellen MacArthur Foundation appear poised to become influential catalysts of positive global change.
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Cheng Kin Ming Has His Investments Focused on Green Cities

Cheng Kin Ming Has His Investments Focused on Green Cities | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
“By investing in companies that together bring total solutions, we enable cities to transform the ways they grow and consume resources and we can ensure a high quality of life for us and for future generations.”
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:
Cheng Kin Ming, whose recent investments in solar companies are estimated to be worth nearly $20 billion – making him the world’s largest private investor in clean technologies – is speaking publicly for the first time about his strategy to accelerate the world’s transition to green cities. His approach is to identify the world’s best, complementary clean technology companies to create entire supply chains, across multiple verticals, to produce integrated solutions on an enormous scale.
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The Termite and the Architect: Biomimicry Shifts from Mere Content, to Complex Process

The Termite and the Architect: Biomimicry Shifts from Mere Content, to Complex Process | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
“Are you in the mind of the wasp? Do you know what an ‘error’ is? You can only measure. Just measure.”

A truer biomimicry, Soar believes, would abandon simple biophilia and its crude design metaphors—bullet trains as bird beaks, sharkskins as swimsuits, or termite mounds as skyscrapers. Instead, architects and designers would begin building things as nature builds them. That is, iteratively and algorithmically, with each form sculpted by many optimized functions, each of which acts as its own independent agent. Soar and many others have experimented with simulating insects and insect homes using “agent modeling systems” in which thousands, millions, even billions of individual programs— each a very primitive “virtual insect” with its own objective—compete over limited resources within some carefully arranged digital domain. Following the “right” set of rules in their virtual world, the agents can replicate the structures and morphologies actual insects create in reality. These systems are not limited to replication, however—they can also be used for innovation. Sometimes, complex optimizations can emerge that bear little resemblance to anything produced by the minds of insects or of humans.

“For architectural problems, one agent may want to resolve a door, another a window, another the flow of water or of heat, and collectively they negotiate a solution,” Soar says. “This is possible now because computers can handle the massive amounts of information required.”
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

“Are you in the mind of the wasp? Do you know what an‘error’ is? You can only measure. Just measure.”

 

A truer biomimicry, requires that we not only appreciate "what works" in nature (the content), but that we study the process of creating itself....and then build those insights into our own creative process, which is usually quite collaborative, relational, and communal. Architectural genius is not a lone genius at all. Its an interplay. An inter-fusion. A double interact. 

 

 

 

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