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how climate change is making the world more dangerous

how climate change is making the world more dangerous | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
“Disasters including storms, floods and heatwaves have increased fivefold since the 1970s, UN finds (8 charts that show how climate change is making the world more dangerous http://t.co/8iBT9d0SAT)...”
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:
The first decade of the 21st century saw 3,496 natural disasters from floods, storms, droughts and heat waves. That was nearly five times as many disasters as the 743 catastrophes reported during the 1970s – and all of those weather events are influenced by climate change.
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Business as an Agent of World Benefit
Sustainable design; green economy; csr; sustainable development; Business as an Agent of World Benefit; Appreciative Inquiry; David Cooperrider; CSR
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Do You Want a 15% Spike in Profitability? This Study is Clear About Women in Top Management Company Leadership

Do You Want a 15% Spike in Profitability? This Study is Clear About Women in Top Management Company Leadership | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Almost 60 percent of the companies reviewed had no female board members, and more than 50 percent had no female executives. Just under 5 percent had a female chief executive.
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

The business case for women in company leadership is getting clearer, and from a critical perspective such appreciation raises the question: why is it taking so long?  

 

A study led by Marcus Noland found that female C.E.O.s did not significantly underperform or overperform when compared with male chief executives. 


But the data was clear about women in top management positions. An increase in the share of women from zero to 30 percent would be associated with a 15 percent rise in profitability, Mr. Noland said.

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Appreciative Intelligence Sees the Future in the Texture of the Actual: That's What AIM2Flourish is All About

Appreciative Intelligence  Sees the Future in the Texture of the Actual: That's What AIM2Flourish is All About | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

AIM2Flourish is the largest worldwide appreciative inquiry  into the discovery and design of positive institutions that we've ever designed.  It celebrates and catalyzes radical innovation, as part of a global "anticipatory learning" challenge. Through intergenerational connections, we're inviting and inspiring the current and next generation of young business leaders to build a better world, by helping them to become the best in the world at seeing the best for the world. It's what my colleague Tojo Thachenkery wrote about in his book called Appreciative Intelligence.  

 

New ways of doing business are both profitable and can be uplifting for people and their communities: that's what we are searching for: Business as an Agent of World Benefit. In the video clips from Ron Fry, Lindsey Godwin, and Roberta Baskin, Chris Laszlo, Peter Senge,myself and others, you are invited to sign up, do interviews using the Appreciative Inquiry approach, and even invite classrooms, workshops you lead, and institutes everywhere to encourage their participants to be part of a movement for good. It's a powerful way to teach and learn appreciative inquiry but most important, the search for Business as an Agent of World Benefit always surprises because the stories are emerging exponentially--and so many of them are still untold.

 

The project, to be sure, is not an answer but a question. And it's a bet on curiosity velocity: acceleration of the future depends on the world's capacity to see the true, the good, the better, and the possible at a velocity that matches the global learning gap, that is, the gap between the complexity of our own making and our learning capacity to innovate ahead of the curve. Click Here:


And if you wish to speak to someone directly Claire Sommer is the best...she is a catalyst and connector, and speaks to the spirit of this inquiry with amazing clarity and conviction.

Don't hesitate to contact her at: claire@aim2flourish.com 

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ThriveAbility: The Next Stage of Development for Sustainability

ThriveAbility: The Next Stage of Development for Sustainability | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
The notion of “sustainability,” while vitally necessary, inspires enthusiasm like a hairshirt. What we humans really want to do is thrive! The problem is that the human pursuit of thriving tends to wreak havoc — we overshoot planetary boundaries and erode social foundations. At its simplest, ThriveAbility reframes the hairshirt aura of sustainability by focusing on the positive benefits of collectively living within our means.
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:
This article, following the pathway of the Laszlo et.al. 2014 book Flourishing Enterprise, is part of a growing wave for aiming higher and delving deeper (in terms of consciousness) in the sustainability domain. You know, points out this article, the classic quip for our field: John: “My marriage is sustainable.” Jane: “Oh, I’m sorry to hear that…” You get it: The notion of “sustainability,” while vitally necessary, inspires enthusiasm like a hairshirt. What we humans really want to do is thrive! The problem sustainability confronts is that the human pursuit of thriving (as currently enacted) wreaks havoc — we overshoot planetary boundaries and erode social foundations. The term ThriveAbility adds several more dimensions to the ESG equation. Besides the Ecological, Societal, and Governance elements, the authors argue for the organizational and cultural, including the stages of consciousness. And each level has its own interventions, tools, and outcomes. For example changes in consciousness may have profound impacts because the deeper levels have bigger impacts than the shallower levels (for example, improving a supply chain to reduce waste). While the change drivers at the first levels are return on investment and the business case, the change drivers at the second and third levels involve our story about ourselves (culture) and ultimately our consciousness (sense of self or inner development and worldview, for example, we are all connected with each other and the whole of life.).
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Salesforce CEO Agrees with Jack Welch: 'The World's Dumbest Idea' is a Shareholder Value's Relentless Short Term Focus

Salesforce CEO Agrees with Jack Welch: 'The World's Dumbest Idea' is a Shareholder Value's Relentless Short Term Focus | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Jack Welch has called it “the dumbest idea in the world.”
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

The discussions on the purpose of business are heating up and it is clear that building value for the good of society, customers, and communities is where the most innovative companies are going. Take Mark Benioff, the CEO of Salesforce.com. “The competitive advantage you gain from being a caring and sharing company is significant,” Benioff wrote in his 2004 book, Compassionate Capitalism. “It instills in your people a higher integrity level. In turn, stakeholders want to be associated with a company that has heart. Community service: You do it because it’s the right thing to do, but it’s also the profitable thing to do.” All of this is resonant with Chris Laszlo's concept of sustainable value--and it's where the long term unites it--both stakeholder value and shareholder value in an upward spiral. 

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Body Shop goes back to its roots: aims to be most sustainable business model on earth.

Body Shop goes back to its roots: aims to be most sustainable business model on earth. | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Yesterday, chairman and chief executive Jeremy Schwartz promised it would become the most ethical and sustainable business on the planet.
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:
When we worked with Anita Roddick years ago--using appreciative inquiry to help advance her courageous and very early vision of business as an agent of world benefit--we wondered how the legacy work she did would translate into the future. The answer looks affirmative--the roots she planted are strong. Now perhaps, the current CEO Jeremy Schwartz will take the organization even further, or aim higher, transforming the idea that sustainability as not just less and less harm, but net positive. Imagine if every company left the world even the tiniest bit net positive. With over 129,000,000 million businesses or more on the planet, and each operating net positive and profitable, there would be a tipping point for flourishing beyond what we can imagine. The hippocratic oath asks for no harm, a huge step for any organization, or human being. And now the fact that the field is opening the horizons to net positive (a recent book is called "Do As Much Good as You Can" in your lifetime) we need to search for the new pioneers. Maybe some, like this one, will be the old pioneers!
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Show Me The Green: Why Climate Risk Disclosure Is Key To Meeting Climate Goals

Show Me The Green: Why Climate Risk Disclosure Is Key To Meeting Climate Goals | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
"Today, there is no question is one of the largest financial risks of our time,” Mindy S. Lubber, President of CERES, told CleanTechnica.
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:
Mindy Lubber has been at the forefront of the finance industry in terms of climate risk and Clean Technia spoke with her. When we did the first investor summit on climate risk in 2003, she reflected, discussions about climate change as a financial risk and a fiduciary issue was a strange notion. there is no question this is one of the largest financial risks of our time,” Mindy S. Lubber, President of CERES, told CleanTechnica. The investor summit on climate risk her organization helped convene last week at the United Nations in New York drew more than 500 investors representing some $22 trillion of assets under management. That the event was oversubscribed was no surprise. Two of the top 3 global risks identified by the WEF this year are climate related, and investors are increasingly getting warned of the physical, liability, and transition risks associated with climate change. What's important here is the very real question about how we think. Climate change projections that look ahead one or two centuries show a rapid rise in temperature and sea level, but say little about the longer picture. On Feb. 8, 2016, a study was published in Nature Climate Change and it looks at the next 10,000 years, and finds that the catastrophic impact of another three centuries of carbon pollution will persist millennia after the carbon dioxide releases. Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-02-long-term-picture-solace-climate.html#jCp
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Appreciating nature's genius radically expands the universe of strengths that can be used to inspire and rewire our brains

Appreciating nature's genius radically expands the universe of strengths that can be used to inspire and rewire our brains | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
How can architects build a new world of sustainable beauty? By learning from nature. Michael Pawlyn describes three habits of nature that could transform architecture and society: radical resource efficiency, closed loops, and drawing energy from the sun.
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:
A great video that illustrates the case for an appreciative way of knowing--the cognitive power of love--as a way to propel design thinking. Also underscores the abundance mindset: unlimited clean energy ; circular economy; and factor 40x resources efficiency models--everywhere. The appreciable world is so much larger than our normal appreciative eye. This is the logical basis for making a conscious shift from DBT--deficit based thinking--to life centric inquiry. How? Architects like Pawlyn are showing the way.
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Ikea commits billions to sustainability and leads a roster of green companies focusing on a better world

Ikea commits billions to sustainability and leads a roster of green companies focusing on a better world | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Ikea plans to become energy independent, using solar energy, wind turbines
(it's also introducing vegan meatballs)
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:
The full story of how business helped in the Paris talks has yet to be fully told. But we know corporate leaders are in some cases committing more to the goals than whole countries. Ikea for example has committed to spending several billion dollars u.s. on renewable energy and sustainable manufacturing, rivalling the efforts of some developed countries to fighting climate change. The figure dwarfs the amounts pledged by some countries to the UN Green Climate Fund. Germany, one of the biggest donors, pledged €750m. Chief executive Peter Agnefjall told Reuters: "People want their leaders to lead. That includes companies like ourselve.
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The world's first 100% solar-powered five-star resort.

The world's first 100% solar-powered five-star resort. | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
The world's first 5-star resort to be completely powered by solar proves that luxury does not have to be sacrificed in the name of sustainability.
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:
The architect here called this the project of a lifetime... examples of sustainability as enchanting enrichment, like this, show how important designerly ways of knowing are as we create the circular economy. What if beauty became one of the central aims of any business. I bet it would lead to astonishment.
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sustainability as enriching enchantment

sustainability as enriching enchantment | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Bjarke Ingels' architecture is luxurious, sustainable and community-driven. In this talk, he shows us his playful designs, from a factory chimney that blows smoke rings to a ski slope built atop a waste processing plant.
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:
The Climate Group reports keeping the world below the 2 degrees Celsius pathway presents a US$12.1 trillion investment opportunity over the next 25 years, a new analysis states. And the new design innovations--from Tesla, to urban gardens, to playful architectures like Bjarke Ingels designs--suggest that The Road From Paris might involve lots of enchanting enrichment. A report by Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF) at the 2016 Investor Summit on Climate Risk hosted by Ceres, shows the opportunities and challenges of filling the ‘gap’ between the business-as-usual (BAU) investment in renewable energy and what is needed to avoid the worst effects of climate change. At the Summit, the UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon called investors to at least double their investments in clean energy by 2020, adding that "we must begin the shift away from fossil fuels immediately.” Last week another BNEF report showed how global clean investment attracted a record US$329 billion last year – about six times the amount invested in 2004. When you combine the economic demand that will flow from sustainability with the enriching enchantment of beautiful design, you can create a positive pathway for business as an agent of world benefit to become the new norm.
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Leonardo DiCaprio Wants Business to focus on our ONLY Home, Planet Earth

Leonardo DiCaprio Wants Business to focus on our ONLY Home, Planet Earth | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
"Currently, less than 3% of all philanthropic giving goes to defending our planet," DiCaprio said. "Again 3% of all philanthropic giving goes towards the protection of our ONLY home, planet earth."
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

Speaking to CEO's around the world Leonardo DiCaprio spoke about the elevated business focus and philanthropy needed to move the world toward 100% renewable clean energy.  He is shocked that only 3% of all philanthropic giving if focused on the state of our planet.

 

"The challenge before us requires each and every one of us to take action," DiCaprio concluded yesterday's speech. "We owe this to ourselves, but more importantly to the future generations who are counting on us."

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Business Can Exponentially Spread Micro-Practices for Peace: A Nobel Peace Prize for Airbnb?

Business Can Exponentially Spread Micro-Practices for Peace: A   Nobel Peace Prize for Airbnb? | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
AFTER THE ATTACKS IN PARIS, AIRBNB CEO BRIAN CHESKY IS REDOUBLING HIS EFFORTS TO EXPAND HIS BUSINESS—AND CLOSE THE CULTURAL GAPS BETWEEN US.
BY MAX CHAFKIN

They’d come from 110 countries, including Cuba, New Zealand, Kenya, and even Greenland. They’d spent $295 for three days of talks, parties, and sightseeing as part of the second annual Airbnb Open. On an unseasonably warm November afternoon, they gathered in a tented, football-field-size arena in Paris’s Parc de la Villette, 5,000 wildly enthusiastic hosts who offer apartments and bedrooms for rent on Airbnb. The company’s CEO, Brian Chesky—a compact and well-built 34-year-old with an aquiline face, muscular neck, and square jaw—spoke to them. "Share your homes, but also share your world," he said,

David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

Business as a peacemaking enterprise? In this article Airbnb's CEO, Brian Chesky shares how the collaborative economy creates conditions for peace through the concept of what I will call the power of "sheer interaction" fueled by the most important micro-practice of peace the world has ever known: hospitality. Hospitality--inviting the Other into our home, our neighborhood, and our local culture--might well be on an exponential curve upward. 


The only way--at least the most powerful way according to all the research on the power of small group dynamics-- to break down barriers and end stereotypes is is through 1st hand connections, and Airbnb's business model brings guests into hospitality zones right in the heart of where people live--so if you go to Paris you live not in the same old commercialized zones but in neighborhoods with all the local culture and people.


Today when it comes to total number of rooms for rent, Airbnb dwarfs the world’s biggest hotel chains.  Airbnb's 2,,000,000 rooms dwarfs all the Hilton and Intercontinental Hotels rooms combined! 


Airbnb, which offers travelers an experience that is more unique and localized than the cookie-cutter offerings of most hotels, has benefited from the shift in consumer preferences to smaller, more localized ideas and products. All Airbnbs are emphatically not the same, and they’re not even all good—hence the need for hosts and guests to review one another. But that texture, Chesky argues, makes travel better, and maybe makes us better, too. His message is that by experiencing distinctly local norms and ideas, by coming to the understanding that the world is varied and rough and interesting, we will learn to see ourselves and others with more humility. "I don’t want to suggest that people living together creates world peace," Chesky tells me, a few weeks after returning from Paris after the terrorist attacks . "But I will say that [living in close proximity to people from other cultures] does make people understand each other a lot more. And I think a lot of conflicts in the world are between groups that don’t understand each other."


Imagine now the Airbnb model applied to everything: people's cars; computing power; gardens; artwork; shop tools; etc. The Airbnb economy = exponential interactivity increases. One of the positive features of business and the exchange of value is that it is bridge or walkway across political boundaries, ethnic and racial boundaries, geographic boundaries, and ideological boundaries. Its modus operandi is not xenophobic but uniting, and its market impulse is mutual exchange of value. And this leads to micro-moments of peace practice. How might we spread micro-moments and micro-practice arenas for the spread of hospitality--especially boundary crossing hospitality? Viewed in this way could it be that Airbnb is one of the most important forces for peace in the world today. 

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Tesla is Wanting the Idea of Competition Reversed: Its Mission Requires Them to Create More Competitors, Not Less

Tesla is Wanting the Idea of Competition Reversed: Its Mission Requires Them to Create More Competitors, Not Less | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Michael Rundle, Wired’s UK editor, got a tour of the Tesla factory recently conducted by none other than Diarmuid O’Connell, Tesla’s vice president of business development. Variously described as committed or combative, it is fair to say O’Connell has drunk deeply of the Tesla Kool Aid and is a firm believer in the gospel according to Musk. If you think Tesla is about building very cool electric cars, you need to delve deeper to understand what is going on below the surface.
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

Tesla's mission--to electrify the post fossil fuel transition--calls them to reframe the basic idea of business strategy, that is to knock off all would be competition where winning and keeping others away from the prize represents the aim. They are reversing the idea. Could it be that working on grand global challenges opens blue ocean opportunities to the point where high purpose companies ignite their success when they inspire other's higher success?  In Tesla's case they see it clearly: they will be a success argues their VP of business development, when they've "inspired the competition." This is the most interesting part of this Clean Technica article: 

 

“Tesla is in the business of inspiring competition,”  Diarmuid O’Connell Tesla's VP said. “The more electric vehicles the better. It would be a fulfillment of our mission if the biggest manufacturer in the US put a mass-market EV on the road. We’re hopeful that they will and frankly that everyone else does.” O’Connell may believe deeply in the Tesla sense of mission, but he is hardly the only one. Rundle heard another Tesla staffer say during the tour that the company is out to save the Earth from “petro-dictators.”

 

Tesla has been criticized for always being late to market with its cars. Both its Model S sedan and Model X SUV were two years behind schedule by the time they finally went on sale. O’Connell is unapologetic. “If we had been able to produce [the Model S] out of the box 12 years ago we would have done so. We had no brand, no capital, no manufacturing base and no developed technology,” he says. “This is the classic technology introduction model that has led to the mass market for everything from air travel to cell phones. This is how you do it if you’re starting from zero.”

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Millenials React To Whole Foods' Millennial-Focused Store Concept Vastly Expanding Beyond Food

Millenials React To Whole Foods' Millennial-Focused Store Concept Vastly Expanding Beyond Food | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Whole Foods' spin-off chain 365 will offer more affordable natural and organic products with the same quality standards, along with other businesses, such as record shops and tattoo parlors.
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

Imagine record shops, digital health electronics,  and sustainable clothing shops--everything that might empathize with the values of the millennial generation-- inside a Whole Foods store. It's underway. 

 

Walter Robb explains:

 

“Today, we are excited to announce the launch of a new, uniquely-branded store concept unlike anything that currently exists in the marketplace,” said Walter Robb, co-chief executive officer of Whole Foods Market. “Offering our industry leading standards at value prices, this new format will feature a modern, streamlined design, innovative technology and a curated selection. It will deliver a convenient, transparent, and values-oriented experience geared toward millennial shoppers, while appealing to anyone looking for high-quality fresh food at great prices.”

 

The Company is building a team to focus exclusively on this new concept and is currently negotiating leases. The plan is to begin opening stores next year, and given the more standardized design and product assortment, the Company expects a fairly rapid expansion from there. “We believe the growth potential for this new and complementary brand to be as great as it is for our highly successful Whole Foods Market brand,” added Robb. 

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Build a Company for the Next 100 Years

Build a Company for the Next 100 Years - Skillshare Writings - Medium
This is “The Law of the Internet”: Everything that can be decentralized will be decentralized.
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

Build a company for the next 100 years by providing, counterintuitively, better value for less. In every industry, there are two kinds of companies: companies that create arbitrary value or companies that create real value for the world. The formula for creating real value in an industry is simple: leverage decentralization to offer products and services that are 10x more affordable + 10x better. Centralized institutions acquire and retain their power by making what they offer inaccessible to most. This drives up costs and makes participation highly exclusive. Decentralized institutions create value by making their offering accessible to all. This drives down costs and makes participation highly inclusive. Once that value is accessible to everyone then that centralized institution is displaced and loses its power.  It's already happening with UBER; Tesla; Skillshare; and more. Read more in this post by Michael Karnjanaprakorn and Kyle Westway's weekend briefing no. 105. 

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Why Elon Musk Is At a Whole Different Level: He is Loved Because He Cares

Why Elon Musk Is At a Whole Different Level: He is Loved Because He Cares | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Originally published EV Obsession. This is an article I’ve been planning to write for approximately half a year. Alas, so many other hot news stories, EV reports, conferences, and the daily t…
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:
Elon cares. This article attempts to unravel the reasons for Elon Musks superstar status, and why so many people respond to his leadership. The conclusion: Elon cares. He is a model of the purpose economy, that part of the business world that succeeds because it's purpose involves the greater good. Pictured with his wife, Elon is family oriented, genuine or authentic, and open--for example about being bullied and humiliated as a child. But this article, again, zeros in on Elons caring to the point of risking everything and here is the part of the article by Clean technica that best summed it up: Speaking of caring… we are repeatedly impressed with this very important point. Elon cares. He cares about others, doesn’t want “jerks” on his teams messing up people’s work atmosphere, wants the customer to be happy (and sometimes goes to absurd lengths to make them so), and wants to spend his life helping society. At least since he “hit it big” with PayPal, Elon has dedicated an absurd amount of his breathing life, and his cash, to helping society. Tesla Motors is about combatting global warming, cleaning the air, building the safest cars on the planet, and making products that excite and inspire people. SpaceX is about helping to make the human species interplanetary,for bringing unprecedented adventure and exploration to another generation. SolarCity is about transitioning to a clean, abundant, and socioeconomically decentralized source of electricity generation, where power moves from vertical to horizontal...every home can be a power producer.
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Can We Create a Flourishing World?

Can We Create a Flourishing World? | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
For tested, practical ways you can apply appreciative inquiry in your own life, in teams or across whole systems click here for a free eBook (link is external).
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

This article is about moving from functioning to flourishing. Michelle McQuaid did an interview with me for Psychology Today, and I want to say that she is doing inspiring work with appreciative inquiry and summing up and making sense of the explosion of research in positive psychology. For tested, practical ways you can apply appreciative inquiry in your own life and for building and designing more positive institutions, in teams or across whole systems click here for a free eBook(link is external).

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Solar Rooftops Can Save Californian Grid & Residents $1.4 Billion Annually

Solar Rooftops Can Save Californian Grid & Residents $1.4 Billion Annually | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Solar rooftops could go a long way to strengthening California's aging power grid, and save its residents more than $1.4 billion annually.
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:
It's important that we do good economic analysis in conjunction with the moral imperative of sustainable design, and the analysts need to accurately think systemically and holistically. . An important new white paper, A Pathway to the Distributed Grid (PDF), aims to evaluate “the economics of distributed energy resources” and outline “a pathway to capturing their potential value.”
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Pentagon orders commanders to prioritize climate change in all military actions

Pentagon orders commanders to prioritize climate change in all military actions | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
The Pentagon is ordering the top brass to incorporate climate change into virtually everything they do, from testing weapons to training troops to war planning to joint exercises with allies.
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:
The pentagon is building climate change awareness into a multipoint strategy, as reported in the Washington Post. The economic implications involve billions in lost opportunity if we fail to appreciate the disruptions, risks, and implications for national security. It's not without critique, but it's a call to respect "actionable science"...according to the article. The directive originated in the office of Frank Kendall, undersecretary of defense for acquisition, technology and logistics. Final approval came from Deputy Defense Secretary Robert O. Work. The directive is loaded with orders to civilian leaders and officers on specifically how counter-climate change strategy is to permeate planning. “This involves deliberate preparation, close cooperation, and coordinated planing by DoD to provide for the continuity of DoD operations, services and programs,” it states. “The DoD must be able to adapt current and future operations to address the impacts of climate change in order to maintain an effective and efficient U.S. military,” it adds. “Mission planning and execution must include anticipating and managing any risks that develop as a result of climate change to build resilience.” Climate change must be integrated in: • Weapons buying and testing “across the life cycle of weapons systems, platforms and equipment.” • Training ranges and capabilities. • Defense intelligence surveillance and reconnaissance. • Defense education and training. • Combatant commander joint training with allies to “assess the risks to U.S. security interests posed by climate change.” • Joint Chiefs of Staff collaboration “with allies and partners to optimize joint exercises and war games including factors contributing to geopolitical and socioeconomic instability.”
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My architectural philosophy? Bring the community into the process

My architectural philosophy? Bring the community into the process | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
When asked to build housing for 100 families in Chile ten years ago, Alejandro Aravena looked to an unusual inspiration: the wisdom of favelas and slums. Rather than building a large building with small units, he built flexible half-homes that each family could expand on. It was a complex problem, but with a simple solution — one that he arrived at by working with the families themselves. With a chalkboard and beautiful images of his designs, Aravena walks us through three projects where clever rethinking led to beautiful design with great benefit.
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:
If you were a designer where would you look for inspiration for socially and ecologically sustainable housing for our overgrown cities? Alejandro Aravena works inside paradoxes, seeing space and flexibility in public housing, clarity in economic scarcity, and the keys to rebuilding in the causes of natural disasters. Where others see disaster, he sees possibilities. Imagine modeling and using the best in slums to see new designs? It's been said that the real challenge in discovery is not finding new lands but seeing with new eyes. Apple used to say Think Different. Alejandro says See Different. How many of us would see good things--to actually inspire us--in a favela or slum community. What a perfect example of appreciative intelligence!
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AIM2Flourish's curator insight, February 2, 9:48 AM

Welcome to AIM2Flourish! We are a UN-supported global learning initiative where business students discover untold stories of businesses that are doing good *and* doing well. What makes AIM2Flourish special is a one-to-one positive interview between a business student and a business leader, that is based on Appreciative Inquiry.


Appreciative Inquiry has many definitions, but at its core, it’s based on the simple idea that organizations – and even individuals -- move in the direction of what we most frequently ask about.   In our lives, our organizations and even in our societies, we tend to focus on identifying all the problems we have.  Instead Appreciative Inquiry asks us to discover what is already working and build on it.  Whether in our personal lives with family and friends, to our teams at work, to our broader communities, Appreciative Inquiry is an invitation to uncover the BEST in ourselves and others, and to envision and live into the best images of the future.   And it works! Appreciative Inquiry is used by organizations of all sizes around the world to create and achieve extraordinary results.


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The Growing Business Case For Compassionate Leaders

The Growing Business Case For Compassionate Leaders | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Is compassionate leadership becoming a trend? Garner believes we’re seeing the birth of a new tier of compassionate leaders who value the welfare of their employees, customers and the communities they serve alongside their traditional metrics.
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

Jane Dutton and her colleagues at University of Michigan have gathered a tremendous data-base on compassion as a source of positive organizational performance...check out their workshop. Jane is not just a top scholar and pioneering thought leader, but an amazing exec ed teacher...

 

Leaders, managers, and change agents regularly face the challenge of demoralizing organizations and dehumanizing institutions that drive out engagement and undermine our community’s capabilities to innovate, serve each other well, or achieve excellence. This interactive and enlivening workshop will invite you to focus on the surprising power of compassion to renew the human capacity for innovation, service, and excellence in our organizations. We will help you see and adapt an evidence-based case for links between compassion and outcomes that matter for your organization, such as employee and client engagement, recruitment and retention, adaptability, and strategic advantages in service delivery and innovation. You will walk away with new ideas and new techniques for awakening compassion in your organization, group, or team, as well as with the answers to three key questions:

 

1. What is the evidence that compassion matters for organizations and human communities?

2. How do I unleash and magnify compassion in my organization?

3. How do we work with the obstacles to compassion that inevitably arise in any organization?

 

Professors Jane Dutton and Monica Worline of the Ross School of Business and the Center for Positive Organizations will share a summary of over 15 years of compassion research in a lively, interactive format that will engage you in sharing stories, trying out new techniques, and applying what we’ve learned about how compassion improves organizations to your specific area of interest.

 

Free and open to the public. For more information, contact Genel Frye at the Center for Positive Organizations at gfrye@umich.edu or at 734/764-0544.

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Jacqueline Wong's curator insight, February 5, 7:08 PM

"Love is the only emotion that expands intelligence." - Humberto Maturana, Chilean Biologist.   Too many business leaders shun the word love as a taboo topic in meeting rooms. It is perhaps the limited or somewhat childish interpretation of love that led to this avoidance.   Therefore our understanding and  experience of love as an emotion at the workplace is also limited as a consequence.  Understanding how these micro moments of positive resonance are experienced at work may help to yield important insights to counter the epidemic of burnout at workplaces.  #valueofpositivebehavior

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Companies with a purpose beyond profit tend to make more money: But why?

Companies with a purpose beyond profit tend to make more money: But why? | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
While 90 per cent of respondents in the new study said their company understood the importance of purpose, less than half thought it ran in a purpose-driven way. Why the discrepancy?
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

One of the paradoxes of business is that the most profitable companies are NOT those that are most profit-focused. But is it a paradox, really? 

 

In a survey titled “The Business Case for Purpose”, a team from Harvard Business Review Analytics and professional services firm EY’s Beacon institute declares “a new leading edge: those companies able to harness the power of purpose to drive performance and profitability enjoy a distinct competitive advantage”. This is a support for the book by Raj Sisodia et al on "Firms of Endearment" and it's also consistent with the findings of Jim Collins and Jerry Porras, who in 1994’s Built to Last found that between 1926 and 1990 a group of “visionary” companies — those guided by a purpose beyond making money — returned six times more to shareholders than explicitly profit-driven rivals. And Peter Drucker was clear about it a long time ago...profit is a measure that you are excelling at your purpose, it's not the goal.

 

Why are young people with amazing talent flocking to Tesla? It's the opportunity to advance something greater than the self, in this case to electrify the clean energy revolution and accelerate sustainable transport.  


This new survey defines purpose as “an aspirational reason for being which inspires and provides a call to action for an organisation and its partners and stakeholders and provides benefit to local and global society” — and others, like founder of Visa and former CEO Dee Hock define it like this: "a powerful purpose is something where at the end of my life I say to myself, My life had meaning, value and significance because I was a part of that enterprise."  How many companies aspire to this standard? 


The data says they should!

 

 

 
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Let Them Eat Bulk: The Rapid Success of France’s Cheap, Zero-Waste Food Chain

Let Them Eat Bulk: The Rapid Success of France’s Cheap, Zero-Waste Food Chain | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
VERSAILLES, France—Burlap bags line the storefront windows of Day by Day, a fast-growing chain of bulk stores that are popping up all over France. Decorative tin cans mingle with glass jars in all sorts of shapes and sizes on the shelves, loose bars of soap release a pleasant aroma—all reminiscent of the grocery store that I could have dreamed up trying to reproduce Oleson’s Mercantile as depicted in the Little House on the Prairie TV show.
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

Going packaging-free for food purchases by frequenting bulk foods sections in grocery stores is a high-impact way to shrink your waste: In the U.S., about 30 percent of total waste is food containers and packaging, such as cereal boxes, milk cartons, and potato chip bags. One of the fastest growing grocery chains in France--Day by Day--is showing the way. The chain now counts nine locations spread out through northern and western France and the Paris suburbs. It received 1,000 franchise requests in 2015. It plans to open 25 more stores by the end of 2016 and aims to have 100 locations by 2018.  


“They (our customers) want to consume more responsibly, pollute less, and limit waste. All these factors made us want to launch a store concept that would be close, sell quality products in just the right quantity and without packaging.” -

--Day by Day Co-owner Didier Onraita

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When Business Solves a Grand Challenge It Makes a Profit--Which Lets That Solution to Grow

When Business Solves a Grand Challenge It Makes a Profit--Which Lets That Solution to Grow | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Michael E. Porter wrote the books on modern competitive strategy for business. Now he is thinking deeply about the intersection between society and corporate interests
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

How do we let solutions grow? Is it more government aid? Is it relying on good intentions and good charity? Is some areas the answer is "yes" to both of those but in an estimated 90% of the cases--like creating a viral push toward 100% renewable energy; or eradicating extreme poverty; or creating millions of opportunities for dignified work that gives meaning and significance and self esteem--the answer is good business. 


Why do we turn to nonprofits, NGOs and governments to solve society's biggest problems? Michael Porter admits he's biased, as a business school professor, but he wants you to hear his case for letting business try to solve massive problems like climate change and access to water. Why? Because when business solves a problem, it makes a profit — which lets that solution grow. Scaling up excellence in the form of what Chris Laszlo calls sustainable value, is the sweet spot of business, and the scaling up excellence is the call of our times.  

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Approaching 100% Renewable Projects in 2016 with a Fresh Strategy

Approaching 100% Renewable Projects in 2016 with a Fresh Strategy | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Public opposition is not uncommon for renewable energy proposals, and in order to see projects through to approval, efforts must be taken to build public support. Too often, a silent but supportive majority exists in communities where a new project is proposed. By incentivizing the issue as “something to lose,” (i.e. tax revenue, jobs, clean energy production) residents will be more apt to speak out in support. There is no magic word to urge people to get involved in support, but through proper education and advocacy techniques, the kinds of defeated proposals of yester-year can have a shot in 2016.
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

In 2015, the United States experienced its third city’s attempt to move to 100 percent renewables. Aspen, Colorado, now joins Burlington, Vermont, and Greensburg, Kansas, as the only cities to achieve 100 percent renewable energy generation in the nation. It's clear where the future is heading, yet it's not always easy. Stories abound of public opposition because a silent majority of passionate supporters are not engaged and called to collaborate, lead, and help make each change step as strong as it could be. In this age of collaboration the tools and methods are there and this article in Environmental Leaders shares a few insights on how to lift up the positive resources for change that exist in any community.  

Read more: http://www.environmentalleader.com/2016/01/04/approaching-renewable-projects-in-2016-with-a-fresh-strategy/#ixzz3xKe4mNMp


See also Cooperrider's "The Concentration Effect of Strengths" article available at the top of http://www.davidcooperrider.com/


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