Business as an Agent of World Benefit
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3rd Apple Solar Farm shows Apple Leadership and Vision

3rd Apple Solar Farm shows Apple Leadership and Vision | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
“Apple, the electronics wizard, has permission to establish its third solar farm in North Carolina. Apple plans to spend $55 million, to create this 17.5 MW new solar farm.”
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
As many of you know, Apple was hounded by Greenpeace for years because it lagged behind tech colleagues in transitioning to a clean energy future. But then it started announcing solar farms to cover 75% its electricity use, it hired former EPA Chief Lisa Jackson to act as Vice President of Environmental Initiatives, it announced plans to become 100% powered by renewables, and it became known as more of a clean energy leader than a clean energy laggard. That trend continues.
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Business as an Agent of World Benefit
Sustainable design; green economy; csr; sustainable development; Business as an Agent of World Benefit; Appreciative Inquiry; David Cooperrider; CSR
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Ideo Studied Innovation In 100+ Companies–Here’s What It Found

Ideo Studied Innovation In 100+ Companies–Here’s What It Found | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Innovation is hard to pin down, but with these six insights Ideo says it’s cracking the code.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
We know that high purpose companies--with a purpose beyond profit-- have higher engagement scores. Now a new study shows high purpose is an innovation engine.  Ideo’s data shows that having a meaningful purpose beyond profit is important for businesses that  need to adapt quickly and successfully. Based on the companies that have used Ideo's new index to measure innovation--it is called "Creative Difference"-- projects and strategic solutions succeed 20.40% more often when leaders articulate the company’s mission in high purpose terms clearly and then reliably practice what they preach.
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Positive organization development: A new change equation that’s changing everything – Center for Positive Organizations

Positive organization development: A new change equation that’s changing everything – Center for Positive Organizations | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Drawing from his forthcoming book, David Cooperrider, will explore the proposition that the quest for a flourishing earth is the most significant organization development opportunity (OD) of the 21st century. When people in organizations work toward building a more flourishing world, they are poised to thrive in ways that ignite innovation, leadership development, and inspired workplace performance. Cooperrider calls this dynamic “mirror flourishing.” He will show how the design of positive institutions—institutions that magnify and refract our highest human strengths outward into the world—is OD’s ultimate North Star. Cooperrider envisions a watershed moment in OD research and practice where our field moves from micro-OD to macro-OD, and then back again.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
I am excited to be joining my colleagues at University of Michigan's Center for Positive Organizational Scholarship on April 24th, 2017. I will be doing talks on a major movement to Accelerate Positive Education in America as well as to speak to a new book I'm working on with Lindsey Godwin, where i will explore the proposition that the quest for a flourishing earth is the most significant organization development opportunity (OD) of the 21st century. When people in organizations work toward building a more flourishing world, they to are poised to thrive in ways that ignite innovation, leadership development, and inspired workplace performance. My colleagues and I call this dynamic “mirror flourishing.” I will then show how the design of positive institutions—institutions that magnify and refract our highest human strengths outward into the world—is OD’s ultimate North Star. What I am envisioning is a watershed moment in OD research and practice where our field moves from micro-OD to macro-OD, and then back again.
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This invention lets rural Hondurans clean their water – and own the treatment plants

This invention lets rural Hondurans clean their water – and own the treatment plants | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Doña Reina remembers the water that ran from the tap at her home in rural Honduras. It was yellowish, opaque, she said in Spanish, and “y sucia,” which means dirty. Then, in 2008, her small village of Tamara received its first water treatment plant, a gravity-fed system made of locally sourced materials that was designed by engineering students in the US. Today, Reina’s water is clean enough to drink from the tap.

The students were part of a Cornell University programme called AguaClara, which focuses on treating water affordably in infrastructure-poor communities, and without using electricity. Since 2005, AguaClara, which means clear water, has helped complete 14 plants in partnership with Hondurans who planned and built the structures. Now locals own and operate these plants, which serve around 65,000 people.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
In www.aim2flourish.com terms this is an inspiring "sighting" of what can happen when you engage universities, innovative and entrepreneurial students and a global problem/opportunity. What emerges is a win-win-win "business as an agent of world benefit" innovation. 

Doña Reina remembers the water that ran from the tap at her home in rural Honduras. It was yellowish, opaque, she said in Spanish, and “y sucia,” which means dirty. Then, in 2008, her small village of Tamara received its first water treatment plant, a gravity-fed system made of locally sourced materials that was designed by engineering students in the US. Today, Reina’s water is clean enough to drink from the tap. The students were part of a Cornell University programme called AguaClara, which focuses on treating water affordably in infrastructure-poor communities, and without using electricity. Since 2005, AguaClara, which means clear water, has helped complete 14 plants in partnership with Hondurans who planned and built the structures. Now locals own and operate these plants, which serve around 65,000 people. 
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L’Oreal, Ben and Jerry’s, and more see benefit in “carbon insetting” | Ensia

L’Oreal, Ben and Jerry’s, and more see benefit in “carbon insetting” | Ensia | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Insetting does more than just offset carbon emissions—it helps companies boost resilience and care for the ecosystems that provide their raw materials.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
“Carbon insetting” is a new trend that enables companies to offset a portion of their carbon emissions through agroforestry efforts within their own supply chains. The technique is also helping to sequester carbon and help companies enhance their supply chain resiliency, while restoring the ecosystems on which their raw material growers depend. 

Andrea Asch, manager of natural resources at Ben and Jerry’s, which is working with PUR Projet on initiatives involving coconut and vanilla growers in Peru and Uganda, respectively, says: “Insetting looks at the total needs of the community. It’s not so much about the carbon sequestration reductions we’re trying to achieve; it’s about helping communities adapt to the impacts from the emissions all of us in the global north have dumped into the atmosphere.”
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Customer Orientation Drives Environmental Innovation

Customer Orientation Drives Environmental Innovation | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Firms adopting environmental management practices are customer-oriented.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
True to AI’s 360-degree approach, customers should be essential contributors to creating retail products or services. In this article, the author considers the vital role customers play in developing environmental innovations. He advises that businesses can benefit by an increased likelihood of success of the innovation by directly recruiting customer input in their innovation process. 

“Customers increasingly like being included in the development of firms and their products, but these days there is a sustainability dimension to this inclusion,” writes Hubert Gatignon. “Customers feel a responsibility to make sustainable decisions when it comes to their relationships with firms and what they buy from them. Several studies have shown that customers are willing to pay a premium for environmental benefits, while they also take the firm’s socially responsible activities into account when making purchase decisions.”
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GM Has Committed to 100% Renewable Energy by 2050

GM Has Committed to 100% Renewable Energy by 2050 | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
“Establishing a 100 percent renewable energy goal helps us better serve society by reducing environmental impact,” said GM Chairman and CEO Mary Barra. “This pursuit of renewable energy benefits our customers and communities through cleaner air while strengthening our business through lower and more stable energy costs.”
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
I love the phrase "we are going 100% renewable energy" -- and I am hearing these words over and over now. I think we are reaching a tipping point. Never before have we experienced such an exciting time for clean energy innovation. In 2015, venture capitalists and private equity investors funneled a little over $6 billion into clean energy companies globally, 27 percent more than in 2014. And according to Standard & Poor’s, the Paris Agreement will unleash over $16 trillion in investment in cleantech over the next 15 years.
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Indian firm leads in a race to turn carbon into clean profit

Indian firm leads in a race to turn carbon into clean profit | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Carbonclean is turning planet-heating emissions into profit by converting CO2 into baking powder – and could lock up 60,000 tonnes of CO2 a year
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
The race to turn carbon into clean profit is on! A story from the Optimist is inspiring. In southern India, a carbon capture plant at the industrial port of Tuticorin has figured out how to successfully use CO2 emissions to make baking soda. Unlike carbon capture and storage, in which emissions are forced into underground rocks at great cost and no economic benefit, the Tuticorin plant is said to be the first economically viable industrial scale example of carbon capture. The firm behind the process says its chemical will lock up 60,000 tons of CO2 a year and the technology is attracting interest from around the world.
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Peter Diamandis

Peter Diamandis | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
The graph below shows that, if solar electricity continues on its current demonetization trajectory, by the time solar capacity triples to 600GW (by 2020 or 2021, as a rough estimate), we could see global unsubsidized solar prices that are roughly half the cost of coal and natural gas.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
These are the kinds of things I wish were being splashed all over the news--because it's big news. That things are getting better and better is not a common understanding. But more important than good news today is the good news we can make happen in the future. In 88 minutes, 470 exajoules of energy from the sun hits the Earth’s surface, as much energy as humanity consumes in a year. In 112 hours – less than five days – it provides 36 zettajoules of energy. That’s as much energy as is contained in all proven reserves of oil, coal and natural gas on the planet. And the price of solar electricity: by 2021 we could see global unsubsidized solar prices that are roughly half the cost of coal and natural gas.
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COP22: Reactions from Social Entrepreneurs

COP22: Reactions from Social Entrepreneurs | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it

With 2016 on track to be the hottest year on record and temperatures 20°C higher than expected in the Artic this month, addressing climate change though a coordinated, multi-sector approach is becoming increasingly urgent.

Last year’s Paris Agreement was a historic milestone in the climate movement, with a global consensus reached around targets to limit global temperature increase to well below 2°C, reach zero net greenhouse gas emissions in the second half of the century, and re-visit and strengthen the national climate plans (NDCs) of participating countries every five years. The Paris Agreement also entered into force at unprecedented speed, less than a year after its adoption at COP21, compared to eight years for the Kyoto Protocol.

This month’s COP22 talks in Marrakesh demonstrated a continued spirit of global unity to tackle climate change, despite the results of the US election. Leading US businesses left no doubt about their commitment to the low-carbon future, issuing a public statement signed by 365 companies and investors reiterating their support for the Paris Climate Agreement and supportive low-carbon policies. The “Business Backs Low-Carbon USA” statement, signed by DuPont, General Mills, Kellogg’s, Mars, and other iconic brands, was addressed to President-elect Trump and other US leaders.

David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
I love the insights and reflections of our young social entrepreneurs and more seasoned leaders. The Skoll Foundation put together their observations from the transition from Paris agreements to this month's talks in Marrakesh. For example Cindy Lubbers commented:  "Despite the long shadow from the US election, the climate negotiations in Morocco, which wrapped up last weekend, were a remarkable feat of global optimism, resolve, and concrete action by countries and the business community alike. Leading US businesses left no doubt about their commitment to the low-carbon future, issuing a public statement signed by 365 companies and investors reiterating their support for the Paris Climate Agreement and supportive low-carbon policies. The “Business Backs Low-Carbon USA” statement, signed by DuPont, General Mills, Kellogg’s, Mars, and other iconic brands, was addressed to President-elect Trump and other US leaders. 
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The scientists with reasons to be cheerful

The scientists with reasons to be cheerful | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it

"Not every problem has an obvious solution, which is why during the 1850s Britain bought 300,000 tons of bird poo a year from Peru. This was guano, the wonder fertiliser that had been discovered by Europeans at the start of that century. It was shipped back to the motherland, where it helped to feed the burgeoning and rapidly industrialising population, mainly through the medium of turnips.

In a modern globalised world, the idea of transporting large quantities of avian dung thousands of miles in wooden sailing boats to grow turnips seems less incongruous. For Ruth DeFries, a professor of ecology and sustainable development at Columbia University in New York, the guano craze is one example of how over the centuries human ingenuity has risen to the challenge of feeding ourselves.

David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
We’re older, wiser, healthier: Max Roser, who runs Our World in Data, uses statistics to tell the real stories about our world.
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Google just notched a big victory in the fight against climate change

Google just notched a big victory in the fight against climate change | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Google will soon purchase enough renewable energy for all of its global operations
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
In 2015 alone, Google consumed 5.2 terawatt hours of electricity, almost as much as the entire city of San Francisco. Soon, in 2017, it will power 100% of its global operations with renewable energy. This obviously is a big victory in a world of political uncertainty that could easily start backtracking from Paris agreements, etc. But every company should be inspired by steps forward like this that are win-win, being both good for business and better for our sustainable value future. 
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The best way for power companies to position themselves for a bright future in tomorrow’s clean energy economy is to break the common solar-versus-utility narrative.

The best way for power companies to position themselves for a bright future in tomorrow’s clean energy economy is to break the common solar-versus-utility narrative. | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Power companies that take initiative now and work with distributed energy resources can position themselves well in tomorrow’s clean energy economy
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Utility companies are at a crossroads and have some critical decisions to make fairly quickly, regarding whether or not and how they incorporate renewable energy as part of their power grids. First and foremost, they need to change the typical solar-versus-utility perspective. As this writer points out, there will be increasing consequences for those utility companies that choose not to pursue clean energy options. They must, she says, make the choice whether to be “leaders or laggards.” 

 “In order to stay competitive, utility companies, grid operators and the people who regulate them need to do what’s right for people and planet — incorporate renewable energy, storage and software to modernize the grid,” Gavriella Keyles states. “The momentum for renewable energy builds as prices fall and emissions regulations tighten. Supporting this trend doesn’t stop at pro-solar policies. Innovating to keep up with the technology is essential for both wider adoption of renewables and a better, more resilient grid.”
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Lady Scotland Says We Need a Quantum Shift: The Agenda is Not Sustainability as Less Harm But Regenerative Reversal 

Lady Scotland Says We Need a Quantum Shift: The Agenda is Not Sustainability as Less Harm But Regenerative Reversal  | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Cities that mimic forests, bricks made from converted carbon dioxide and highways lined with wind turbines powered by traffic. These are ideas that, for now, still belong to a distant, brighter future – when the world’s focus can be turned from halting runaway climate change to actually reversing it.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Lady Scotland Secretary-General of the Commonwealth of 52 Nations says we need a quantum shift:  “I am offering myself as the advocate for climate regenerative change,” she told the workshop, calling on participants to come up with the solutions that could deliver a “quantum shift” in each of the Commonwealth’s member states when it came to climate change policy. Sustainability as less harm is simply not bold enough or inspiring enough to engender the heroic energy we need. Thank you Lady Scotland!
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Tesla is now bigger than Ford despite selling a fraction of the cars — and a threat is looming over the future

Tesla is now bigger than Ford despite selling a fraction of the cars — and a threat is looming over the future | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Tesla is having a big week.

The automaker is now bigger than Ford in market cap.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Tesla is now bigger than Ford in market cap. Tesla was even on the verge of surpassing GM in market cap on Tuesday. This is a big deal for a company that has sought to contend with fossil fuel car manufacturers. Not too long ago, many doubted Tesla could survive just producing electric vehicles. Fast forward to 2017 and Tesla is selling commercial batteries capable of storing solar, on a mass scale, and is wanting to create a solar energy revolution by uniting zero emissions cars and homes with renewables—that is, cars and homes running on sunshine. But the real story here is how much management skill “doing good and doing well” actually takes. Sustainable value creation is innovation’s new frontier, but it takes management skill, boldness, and tremendous business vision. So often we focus on the “doing good” part of the equation, and gloss over the management acumen. There is so much to learn. "We were in production hell," Musk said during the company's second-quarter earnings call. "We climbed out of hell in June." But Musk is preparing accordingly to ensure the Model 3 launch goes off without any hiccups. In November, Tesla bought a German automation company to help speed up assembly line production. Tesla also shut down its Fremont factory temporarily in February to prepare it for Model 3 production. This has to be one of the most dramatic, high stakes, and exciting business stories of our time on both the “do good and do well” sides of the equation.Maybe some day we will not need cars any longer and will have even better forms of mobility, so for me the more interesting side of Tesla is how it's going to be a major force in the larger energy transition to 100% renewables and a post fossil fuel economy. 
 
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Reverse Innovation Seminar w/Vijay Govindarajan will be available via WebEx! - dlc6@case.edu - Case Western Reserve University Mail

Reverse Innovation Seminar w/Vijay Govindarajan will be available via WebEx! - dlc6@case.edu - Case Western Reserve University Mail | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Weatherhead School of Management's
Department of Design & Innovation
cordially invites you to a research seminar
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Reverse innovation is one powerful design thinkers tool that can help companies stay ahead of the curve and capture the magic of the "high purpose economy."  
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It’s time for apparel brands to pursue sustainability at the industry level

It’s time for apparel brands to pursue sustainability at the industry level | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
After five years as a corporate sustainability professional, I concluded current incentives aren’t working. Here’s what could.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Written by a young professional within the apparel industry, this article offers strong suggestions for improved and increased sustainability practices. The industry has continued to struggle with these issues, from water pollution caused by the discharge of hazardous chemicals to the need for cost-effective ways to clean up their factories. The companies, she says, are not addressing these issues individually, so she suggests investment in industry-level R&D to give consumers a meaningful metric of sustainability that would enable them, for example, to support more eco-friendly brands. 

“My view is that the more effective role for brands is to invest in external industry-wide sustainability research and technology aimed at developing those systemic solutions,” says writer Mary Hable, who has worked as a corporate sustainability expert for a major apparel retailer for the past five years. “To drive investment, industry should track contributions from each company and share the information with consumers. Consumers could then use this information to judge — and reward — brands’ commitment to sustainability.”
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Renewable energy accounts for almost 90% of new power 

Renewable energy accounts for almost 90% of new power  | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Wind overtakes coal and Germany is responsible for 44 per cent of all the wind farms installed in Europe last year. But progress is in danger of stalling, say experts
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Renewable energy accounts for almost 90% of new power--in Europe. For example, wind energy is now a mainstream and essential part of Europe’s electricity supply. It is also a mature and significant industry in its own right, providing 330,000 jobs and billions of euros of European exports. This narrative is an important one--and it is a surprise to many!
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Consumer goods giant Unilever to make all of its plastic fully reusable or recyclable by 2025

Consumer goods giant Unilever to make all of its plastic fully reusable or recyclable by 2025 | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
According to the Ellen MacArthur Foundation (EMF), which campaigns for the wider adoption of so-called circular economy models, just 14 per cent of the plastic packaging used globally makes its way to recycling plants, while 40 per cent ends up in landfill.

By 2050, the EMF estimates there will be more plastic than fish in the world’s oceans.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
When the EMF estimates that there will be more plastic in than fish in the oceans by 2050, its a big deal when companies such as Unilever commit to 100% recyclable by 2025.  According to Optimist news, Unilever, the consumer goods giant behind brands such as Dove, Ben & Jerry’s and Marmite, has pledged to ensure that all of the plastic packaging from its product “is fully reusable, recyclable or compostable by 2025”.
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UN Global Compact Searching for Local SDG Pioneers

UN Global Compact Executive Director Lise Kingo announces search for local entrepreneurs and change-makers who are making the global goals local business
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
So happy to be working www.aim2flourish.com and it's support with the PRME and Global Compact (some 8,000 corporations)...UN Global Compact Executive Director Lise Kingo announces search for local entrepreneurs and change-makers who are making the global goals local business. If you are a business leader or change-maker advancing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) on a local level, visit the website to submit your story today: http://unglobalcompact.org/sdgpioneers.
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Best of Green Schools 2016

Best of Green Schools 2016
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Solar gardens. Building green walls with waste. Creating a solar campus while learning physics. This is a huge opportunity to link positive psychology (individual flourishing) with sustainability-as-flourishing (full spectrum flourishing.) This might be the biggest positive education opportunity of the 21st century. It's what we've written about as "mirror flourishing": when we work together to build a better world "out there" guess where the flourishing also happens--yes, it's the "in-here." That's why these awards are so important.    The Best of Green Schools awards recognize the people, schools, campuses and organizations instigating positive change to the status quo by creating healthier, more sustainable and more efficient learning environments. This video highlights the winners of Best of Green Schools 2016 and showcases the diversity and effort of the various recipients in amplifying students’ role in the green schools movement; serving as conduits for collaboration and facilitating partnerships between businesses, school districts and local agencies; and developing and implementing plans to improve eco-literacy, building performance, and health and well-being, among others.
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Stiller Family Foundation Makes $1M Gift to Champlain College’s David L. Cooperrider Center For Appreciative Inquiry

Stiller Family Foundation Makes $1M Gift to Champlain College’s David L. Cooperrider Center For Appreciative Inquiry | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it

Dr. Lindsey Godwin, Professor of Management in the Stiller School of Business and Director of the Cooperrider Center, said the Stiller Family Foundation gift will fund the planning and implementation of a Positive Education Summit in 2018 which is expected to attract a wide array of stakeholders, including teachers, administrators, parents, students, scholars, government and business leaders, and international thought-leaders from around the world.

The Positive Education Summit's goal will be to unite the best in the field of education with the best in the field of positive psychology to accelerate the impacts of positive education for some 23 million preschool children, 50 million students in K-12 classrooms and 20+ million students in higher education, and also help further support schools as positive institutions that are also great places to work for all employees, Godwin said.


http://www.champlain.edu/about-champlain/news-and-events/copperrider-gift

David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:

BURLINGTON, Vt. -- Champlain College's David L. Cooperrider Center for Appreciative Inquiry in the Stiller School of Business has received a $1 million gift from the Stiller Family Foundation to plan and convene a national Positive Education Summit with the Mayerson Academy and others that will use Appreciative Inquiry to accelerate positive education from early childhood on up. see http://www.champlain.edu/about-champlain/news-and-events/copperrider-gift
  
I was so lucky to learn with and work with Bob Stiller starting in the early 2000's when he was the the CEO of Green Mountain Coffee Roasters. The Stiller Family’s catalytic gift has the potential to touch the lives of tens of millions of kids. The fact is we have an unprecedented opportunity in human history to help every child and young person fulfill their potential and achieve both well-being and success. From breakthroughs in the positive psychology of human strengths to the untold story of the greatest educational innovations most people have never heard about, this initiative will create action that is a generation ahead of current thinking.  Yes it will take hundreds and even thousands of organizations and partners to do it. That’s the gift of the Appreciative Inquiry Summit. And in the end here is my prediction: everyone who becomes a partner in this will say at the end of their lives: “my life had meaning because I was part of a positive revolution”—for our kids, our society, and our common future.

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Cartography of the Anthropocene - Globaïa--Big Data Visualization

Cartography of the Anthropocene - Globaïa--Big Data Visualization | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
It's amazing what happens to us when we put things into geological time--see these charts at project Globaia. We’re such a very young species in geological terms. Earth is about 4.5 billion years old. Homo sapiens didn’t show up until 2 million years ago. But in our short stint so far—and especially since the industrial revolution—humans have changed the planet’s ecosystem in profound ways. We’ve built sprawling megacities and transportation networks to connect them, altered the composition of the atmosphere and the ocean, and even—gulp—changed the climate (see Fast Company). Many scientists think this epoch of human influence deserves its own geologic name, like the Pliestocene or the Pliocene. In 2000, the Nobel Laureate Paul Crutzen proposed calling it the Anthropocene. The International Commission on Stratigraphy may make that label official. 
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Warren Buffett: Why Wind Power Isn't Going Away

Warren Buffett: Why Wind Power Isn't Going Away | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
But wind will continue to have at least one powerful backer: Warren Buffett, whose Berkshire Hathaway Energy division is on track to become the country’s largest producer of wind power.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
I love following the wind energy successes, as my son Matt works in the financing domain in this industry. And the prices keep dropping. As Stephen Gandel and Katie Fehrenbacher report this week in Fortune, the average cost of wind energy dropped by about a third between 2008 and 2013; in some parts of the country, it’s the cheapest electricity source available. Not coincidentally, as the chart below shows, wind’s share of renewable-energy output has soared. The Department of Energy expects wind to generate 10% of America’s electricity by 2020, up from about 7% today. (By comparison, coal and natural gas today each account for about a third.)
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The Factory as Forest

The Factory as Forest | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
"Our goal is to achieve zero negative environmental impacts by 2020," said Erin Meezan, vice president at Interface, an innovative producer of carpets and textiles, at Greenbuild in Los Angeles.
Via Janine Benyus
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Restoration. Regeneration. Renewal. Net positive design. These are the goals of an increasing number of companies. “Our goal is to achieve zero negative environmental impacts by 2020,” said Erin Meezan, vice president at Interface, an innovative producer of carpets and textiles. But as the firm nears its goal, it’s now pursuing an even more ambitious vision — the “factory as forest,” in which their manufacturing facilities become positive contributors to the environment, providing as much ecosystem service benefits as their surrounding landscape. This astonishing vision comes from Interface’s deceased founder Ray Anderson and Janine Benyus, whose firm, Biomimicry 3.8, is advising them. Benyus’ guiding idea: “When the forest and the city are functionally indistinguishable, then we know we’ve embedded sustainability.” To achieve this, she calls for using biomimetic design strategies that “consciously emulate nature’s designs.” This is because nature, with 3.8 billion years of evolution, has “already solved most challenges.”
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Could Nanotechnology End Hunger?

Could Nanotechnology End Hunger? | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Increasing numbers of scientists are investigating how nanotechnology could help us grow more food with less.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Thinking nano small could be the solution to a mega issue. This article details how nanotechnology could revolutionize our ability to grow enough food to feed the hungry and prepare for our rather daunting future food production demands. Between the expected disruptions to agriculture from climate change and the projected surge in our global population – 9 billion people by 2050 – this is an essential issue that needs to be addressed now.  
“Scientists are racing to boost food production while minimizing collateral damage to the environment,” writes Melissa Pandika. “To tackle this huge problem, they’re thinking small — very small, as in nanoparticles a fraction of the diameter of a human hair. Three of the most promising developments deploy nanoparticles that boost the ability of plants to absorb nutrients in the soil, nanocapsules that release a steady supply of pesticides and nanosensors that measure and adjust moisture levels in the soil via automated irrigation systems.”
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