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When sidewalks and dance floors become energy sources: Sustainability as Enchanting Enrichment

When sidewalks and dance floors become energy sources: Sustainability as Enchanting Enrichment | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
“ The average person takes about 150 millions steps in a lifetime. What if we could turn all that movement into energy?”
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:
I love it when sustainability is approached as fun, esthetic and entirely imaginative--I call it sustainability as enchanting enrichment. “Imagine if your walk to work in the morning would power the lights for your walk home in the evening.”
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Business as an Agent of World Benefit
Sustainable design; green economy; csr; sustainable development; Business as an Agent of World Benefit; Appreciative Inquiry; David Cooperrider; CSR
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Goldman Sachs Might Be Our Best Bet Against Climate Change: Doing Good is Good Business

Goldman Sachs Might Be Our Best Bet Against Climate Change: Doing Good is Good Business | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
In its 2014 Annual Report, Goldman compares the potential of the renewables market to that of the Internet, “Mass market adoption of any new, disruptive industry often takes a path of early enthusiasm followed by market rejection, volatility and ultimately, acceptance. This was true of the Internet, and evidence suggests a similar course when it comes to clean technology and renewable energy.”
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

The investments going into our transition from a fossil fuel economy to a renewable energy future are growing exponentially. Right now there are (metaphorical) thick clouds of smoke billowing from the financial sector. Goldman Sachs is investing $40 billion in renewables by 2021. Citi has committed $100 billion to the facilitation of clean energy by 2025, and Berkshire Hathaway is investing $15 billion into solar and wind projects at Warren Buffet’s personal behest. Within investment banks, new groups have been created to focus on clean energy development and businesses, such as Morgan Stanley’s Institute for Sustainable Investing and JPMorgan’s Environmental and Social Risk Management division.

 

These decisions weren’t made because they are the right things to do (although they are), but because they make economic sense. Renewables must deliver strong returns first, and the double bottom line impact of benefiting the environment second.

 

This may seem calculated but tapping capital markets is absolutely crucial to the health of the planet. Investing in clean energy is a smart decision — not just a personal passion — and that’s what will allow renewables to achieve global scale.

 

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Keepod: Can a $7 stick provide billions computer access?

Keepod: Can a $7 stick provide billions computer access? | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it

But Mr Bahar and Mr Imbesi want to change that with their Keepod USB stick.


It will allow old, discarded and potentially non-functional PCs to be revived, while allowing each user to have ownership of their own "personal computer" experience - with their chosen desktop layout, programs and data - at a fraction of the cost of providing a unique laptop, tablet or other machine to each person.
In addition, the project avoids a problem experienced by some other recycled PC schemes that resulted in machines becoming "clogged up" and running at a snail's pace after multiple users had saved different things to a single hard drive.

David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

The USB flash drive is one of the most simple, everyday pieces of technology that many people take for granted.

 

Now it's being eyed as a possible solution to bridging the digital divide, by two colourful entrepreneurs behind the start-up Keepod.

Nissan Bahar and Franky Imbesi aim to combat the lack of access to computers by providing what amounts to an operating-system-on-a-stick.

 

In schools in some of the poorest regions of the world the children are totally excited. The amazement at seeing these old laptops come to life was palpable inside the classroom. And the children stayed long after classes had ended to explore and set up their new devices.

 

In six weeks, their idea managed to raise more than $40,000 (£23,750) on fundraising site Indiegogo, providing the cash to begin a campaign to offer low-cost computing to the two-thirds of the globe's population that currently has little or no access.

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Hawaii Will Soon Get 100% of Its Electricity From Renewable Sources: So Can We

Hawaii Will Soon Get 100% of Its Electricity From Renewable Sources: So Can We | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
“We’ll now be the most populated set of islands in the world with an independent grid to establish a 100 percent renewable electricity goal,” State Senator Mike Gabbard (D) told ThinkProgress in an email. “Through this process of transformation we can be the model that other states and even nations follow. And we’ll achieve the biggest energy turnaround in the country, going from 90 percent dependence on fossil fuels to 100 percent clean energy.”
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

Hawaii's state legislature just sent a bill to the governor’s desk this week that moves the renewable portfolio standard (RPS) up to 100 percent by 2045 — which means that all electricity provided by the electric companies will have to come from renewable sources like solar and wind. Nationwide, electricity generation makes up about a third of all carbon emissions. Imagine the opportunity. Well Tesla, Solar City, and NextEra are companies approaching this both as a massive business opportunity but also moral opportunity. Thats what moral imagination does: it figures out how to do good and do well at the same time. Moral imagination is to sustainable value creation what design thinking is to any design opportunity: its about intention. And we can intend both/and. See for example, Stanford's  Mark Jacobsen's well engineered totally positive win-win scenario for all 50 states:


http://news.stanford.edu/news/2014/february/fifty-states-renewables-022414.html



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Entrepreneurs Eager to Dent History

Entrepreneurs Eager to Dent History | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
A multimedia blog and video portal for entrepreneurs & innovators looking to solve problems at scale.
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

"The reasonable man adapts himself to the conditions that surround him... The unreasonable man adapts surrounding conditions to himself... All progress depends on the unreasonable man."

--George Bernard Shaw


***

I love this web-site called "unreasonable." For example one of their posts is all about the innovation that will happen in emerging markets--where necessity and difficult conditions cultivate the innovators imagination.


In places around the world where the grid hasn’t been extended,  for example on one of the blog posts, they’re still figuring out ways to power phones, lights, and other gadgets requiring an electric charge.

 

We can learn a thing or two.

 

Globally, the 6.8 billion mobile phone subscribers number almost as high as the number of people on the planet, butaccording to Green Power For Mobile by The GSMA Development Fund, nearly 500 million people worldwide do not have the means of charging a mobile phone at home. These statistics demonstrate how traditional infrastructure models have not kept up with the technology of the future. Providing a place for the 500 million under-electrified to charge their phones is an enormous wealth-generating opportunity for ambitious entrepreneurs. It will also produce new innovations in electricity infrastructure.

 

Some entrepreneurs are already capitalizing on this opportunity. Juabar is leasing wheeled, solar-powered phone-charging kiosks across Tanzania. While the engineering design is creative, the most important aspect of Juabar’s business model is the financing. Many people in the developing world pay far more to use diesel or other fossil fuel generators than they would spend over the lifetime of a solar system. However, they do not have enough savings to pay for the upfront investment in a solar system. Through financed products like Juabar’s mobile kiosk, entrepreneurs are finding ways to deploy electricity infrastructure that works for the under-electrified.

To service the 500 million cell phone users without access to electricity, entrepreneurs are shunning the large, centralized models of the past and embracing small, distributed technology.

 

In the developed world, when we think about charging a mobile phone, most of us picture a plug-in. Yet, as we move from landlines to mobile phones, the cost of extending the grid to all of the citizens in emerging markets will never be cost effective. Mobiles phones connect rural people in a way landlines never could; the same story is playing out as new energy sources like solar are triumphing over the traditional grid.

Innovating upon the traditional grid model is challenging for developed countries because it is so easy to settle for the existing status quo. The grid works well enough and so there is little incentive to experiment with something better. This is not the case in many developing countries. Distributed micro-grids powered by renewables like wind and solar are the only way for many rural villages to receive cheap power.

 

Large solar companies from SunEdison to Solar City have already created micro-grid solutions for these markets, but the 1.3 billion people across the world without access to electricity is a market too big for just a few companies to capture.

 

Small-scale solutions like solar phones, mobile charging kiosks, and village micro-grids are real and viable—in fact, they are cheaper than both the grid and the diesel power that feeds it.

 

In the developed world, we like to think big. But we might be better off thinking small and asking these questions: Can we find cost-effective solutions to charge mobile phones with no grid? Can we provide electricity to a new home subdivision without extending the existing grid? Can we tap electricity stored in electric vehicles and stationary battery banks to help light a city? The answer to every one of these questions is “yes.”

 

Living laboratories like Africa and Southeast Asia are developing new innovations in distributed and renewable electrical infrastructure. The website Unreasonable features their stories and it is a site i love to visit!

  

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Unilever's CEO is a leader.

Unilever's CEO is a leader. | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
“Floods, wildfires, droughts, heat waves, and other disasters pose a direct risk to our families, friends, and neighbors both near and far.”
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:
There are CEOs and then there are leader CEOs. Some see the larger meaning of preparing for the future... The news today is that the Level of CO2 in the Earth's atmosphere has hit a worrying milestone. Not to ring the alarm bells on global warming or anything, but you should know that the worldwide reading on carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere has hit a significant milestone. CO2 levels surpassed 400 parts per million for the month of March, NOAA scientists said today. There have been readings this high before, but this is the first time that concentrations of the gas have averaged 400 ppm for an entire month. Carbon dioxide is invisible, odorless and colorless, yet it's responsible for 63% of the warming attributable to all greenhouse gases, according to NOAA. Research seems to show that the last time carbon dioxide reached 400 ppm was millions of years ago. It's with this kind of contemporary backdrop that we need to understand the leadership of CEOs like Unilevers Paul Polman. He writes: "So if we are still to create a more sustainable and equitable world for all, we must act quickly and boldly. To stave off economic and environmental catastrophe, companies and policymakers need to come together in order to protect our investments and the public’s wellbeing. That is why, along with other B Team business leaders, we are calling on international negotiators to set a goal of net-zero greenhouse-gas emissions by 2050 in this year’s international climate agreement. The UN Environment Programme (UNEP) found that global greenhouse gas emissions would need to reach net zero by the end of this century to avoid catastrophe, but we can and must do better. An ambitious long-term global goal is a critically important complement to the individual short-term offers that countries will bring to Paris." What about the business case? Is Pplmans sustainability agenda good for the business? Recent analysis is unequivocal. Consumer goods maker Unilever says its brands that most fully embrace its CEO's passion for sustainability perform the best, adding fuel to its oft-repeated argument that social responsibility is good for business. Of the more than 400 brands Unilever sells, those with the strongest sustainability credentials – such as Dove, Lifebuoy, Ben & Jerry’s and Comfort – have seen sales grow at a high single-digit or double-digit rate over the past three years, Unilever said on Tuesday. The company doesn't normally break out sales for individual brands. "These brands accounted for half the company's growth in 2014 and grew at twice the rate of the rest of the business," said Unilever CEO Paul Polman in a statement. Consumers are "increasingly demanding responsible business and responsible brands".
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15 Women Entrepreneurs to Watch in 2015

15 Women Entrepreneurs to Watch in 2015 | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Angelia Trinidad, founder, CEO and designer at Passion Planner.
It’s no surprise that a woman who dedicates her time to helping people pursue “that thing that makes them excited to get up everyday” has caught our attention. Angelia Trindad initially created Passion Planner – a portable life coach, organizer and daily dose of inspiration, all within the pages of a planner – in 2013. Two wildly successful Kickstarter campaigns later, she shipped more than 2,000 Passion Planners in just 20 days and will continue to help transform the habits of thousands in years to come.
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

So many of the award winning entrepreneurs are working with exponential technologies intended to change the world for the better.

 

For example: Vivienne Harr, chief inspiration officer at Stand.

 

When a 10-year-old entrepreneur partners with Biz Stone to launch a mobile platform designed to spur social change, you watch. Vivienne Harr has come a long way since selling lemonade to fight human trafficking; and if she’s already accomplished so much, who knows what’s possible next.

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How Tesla's new battery will revolutionize energy consumption

How Tesla's new battery will revolutionize energy consumption | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Tesla is expanding its business beyond luxury electric cars and looking to power homes and businesses with renewable energy stored in batteries. Will Tesla's experiment prove successful?
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

Elon Musk shows how moonshot thinking, successful entrepreneurship, and a mission to harness the best in business to benefit the world is today's most important leadership formula. And yes there are the basics too: ability to inspire others; insanely great products; ability to execute and attract investments of all kinds. But all of this pales in comparison to boldness built around a purpose so powerful that it fires an internal passion, what I've called an epic positive attractor. I love how he uses very few words:   “Our goal here is to fundamentally change the way the world uses energy,”Musk said during Thursday’s Tesla Energy event. “At the extreme scale.” 

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Movement Mortgage is a Business and Society Innovation Worth Watching

Movement Mortgage is a Business and Society Innovation Worth Watching | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Casey Crawford, a charisma-filled former football star, stands in a dilapidated brick building less than two miles from the stadium where he once played in front of thousands. Today, no one is watching or cheering. And he’s not smiling. The only sound is the echo of his black dress shoes tapping across the empty concrete floor of a cavernous room once used for hydraulic-equipment repairs. There’s a determined look on his face, a focused cadence to his words.

He’s in charge of a multibillion-dollar mortgage business, but today he talks about the homeless. He talks about kids who sleep in cars before going to nearby Ashley Park Elementary School. He talks about immigrants who arrive in Charlotte unable to land good-paying jobs and the generational curse of poverty in the west side.
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

Casey Crawford, 37, is chief executive of the nation’s fastest-growing private mortgage bank. He’s on track to oversee $7 billion in new home loans this year. And over the next decade, he wants to give it away. All of it--and have it generate social impact funds for years to come. How? Transfer 100% of movements shares to the nonprofit arm, yet still have the company aiming for industry-wide leadership in growth and impact.

 

After providing superior value for customers and employees, they intend for all dividends to be paid to The Movement Foundation, where it will be used to invest in community centers and charter schools.

 

“The vision is that everything beyond our capital requirements would be reinvested back into communities across the U.S.,” Crawford says in an interview. “People will come to us because we give them great service and great rates. But how cool would it be for people to know that because they patronize our organization they’re helping reinvest in the community, doing good and loving others. That’s the story I want to tell.”

 

Think about that for a moment. A rising star CEO, running an Inc. 500 success story, with no debt or outside equity, instead of plotting a big exit or an IPO while the market is hot, is preparing to gift his company to nonprofit work.

 

“I think we are cashing out — into other people’s lives,” Harris says. “If all you accomplish is making money, that’s a pretty empty life.”

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The best tech keynote I've ever seen: Elon Musk's Appreciative Intelligence

I've watched a lot of handsomely paid CEOs get on stages for keynote presentations over the past decade, and none were as good as the one I saw Elon Musk give Thursday night in California as he...
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

How do you cultivate appreciative intelligence? You learn from people who see the future in the tiniest successes, progress moments, and strengths of today. For example Xerox could have been Apple. However it could not see what was precious right in front of them. Remember what Steve Jobs said in 1978 when he visited the Xerox research labs to look at what everyone else called a very flawed new computer interface. He looked at it, this ugly and very flawed display, and said something like, "“I thought it was the best thing I’d ever seen in my life…it was very flawed…still, the germ of the idea was there and within, you know ten minutes, it was obvious to me that all computers would work like this some day.” 


The other night, in Hawthorne, California, Elon Musk unveiled “the missing piece” in the transition over to clean energy. The Tesla Powerwall, a large household battery (with industrial applications as well), was that piece.

 

"Our goal is to fundamentally change the way the world uses energy," Musk told a press conference at the Tesla Design Center on Thursday night.

 

"It sounds crazy, but we want to change the entire energy infrastructure of the world to zero carbon." 

 

In Musk’s mind, we orbit the key to weening the world off of fossil fuels. “We have this handy fusion reactor in the sky called the Sun,” he said to the crowd as his keynote. Solar energy then, relying on commercially available solar panels, is the first step in the weening process.

 

We’ve long heard the promise of solar power, but the public hasn’t viewed it as a real competitor to fossil fuels (at least the American public). However, the math is all there. Musk referred to a striking graph to make his point (shown in the video). The blue square is the total amount of surface area that would need to be covered by solar panels to take the US off the grid—and the area is miniscule—like placing a dot on a basketball—a very small dot, from the tip of a felt pen.

 

Why is it so hard to think like an Elon Musk-- someone seeing so much possibility for world transformation in just a tiny battery and the ability to harness the best in business to create value and build a better world? I think, in Tojo Thatchenkery's words its an ability to "see the mighty oak in the acorn"--an appreciative intelligence that comes from disciplined inquiry (look up Tojo's book Appreciative Intelligence.)

 

Leadership = affirmation: its the ability to see the future in the tiniest signs of what works, what's best, and what's possible-- and then to unite all of that with a businessworthy purpose. Appreciative inquiry, together with meaning and purpose, is such a powerful combination.  Changing the entire fossil fuel basis of our economy is bold, for sure, and it's not often you hear CEO's give speeches like this. But its certainly a precious glimpse into appreciative intelligence. You deserve to take a look:

 

http://www.theverge.com/2015/5/1/8527543/elon-musk-tesla-battery-feels

 

But beware its not this leader's flawless oratory skills that make this so powerful: its the authenticity of his vision. Leadership is about seeing; its about the appreciative knowing and the ability to read the world for its intimations of something more.  

 

http://www.theverge.com/2015/5/1/8527543/elon-musk-tesla-battery-feels

 

 

 

 

 

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Tesla's Elon Musk...

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The $5 Billion Race to Build a Better Battery

The $5 Billion Race to Build a Better Battery | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Phil Guidice, the CEO who’s running Sadoway’s Ambri, says new batteries emerging with the help of big backers will finally enable renewables to compete with fossil fuels. “Khosla, Gates, Musk, and the Pritzkers are all excited about changing the world in a better way, and they’re swinging for the fences,” Guidice says. “We’re getting closer every day.”
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

We are in one of those once in a civilization opportunity moments: re-creating the energy basis of an entire economy. The shift to 100% renewable energy is the vision of some of the top business leaders of our times: Gates, Khosla, and Elon Musk among many others. One venture that demonstrates the huge business logic is a relatively new company called Ambri...based on the work of MIT engineers and scientists bent on providing solutions to the battery storage question. Phil Guidice, the CEO who’s running Ambri, says new batteries emerging with the help of big backers will finally enable renewables to compete with fossil fuels. “Khosla, Gates, Musk, and the Pritzkers are all excited about changing the world in a better way, and they’re swinging for the fences,” Guidice says. “We’re getting closer every day.”

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Companies proactive on sustainability have competitive edge

Companies proactive on sustainability have competitive edge | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Corporate sustainability has come a long way in recent decades, morphing from a mere adherence to regulations set down by governments in the 1970s to the integration of environmental and social responsibility principles into core business practices by many companies today. 

But to achieve sustainable development - that is, ensuring that the needs of future generations are not compromised by the present - companies must take an even more proactive approach in their practices, said Dutch professor, author, and former minister Pieter Winsemius at a conference on Tuesday. 

In a keynote address to 200 business and government leaders at Singapore’s Grand Hyatt Hotel, Winsemius shared that in recent decades, business attitudes towards sustainability have evolved through four stages; reactive, functional, integrated and proactive.

In the first ‘reactive’ stage, companies merely abide by government regulations on environmental performance; as they progress to the ‘functional’ stage, they start to explore ways to implement compulsory sustainability measures as efficiently as possible.

The third ‘integrated’ stage sees companies recognising that there are business opportunities in addressing environmental and social challenges, and they begin to integrate sustainability concerns into their operations.

In the final ‘proactive’ approach, businesses take responsibility for meeting the needs of future generations, and adopt long-term thinking to anticipate and fulfil these needs.
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

In a keynote address to 200 business and government leaders at Singapore’s Grand Hyatt Hotel, Dutch former Mckinsey partner and Minister Pieter Winsemius shared that in recent decades, business attitudes towards sustainability have evolved through four stages; reactive, functional, integrated and proactive.

 

In the first ‘reactive’ stage, companies merely abide by government regulations on environmental performance; as they progress to the ‘functional’ stage, they start to explore ways to implement compulsory sustainability measures as efficiently as possible.

 

The third ‘integrated’ stage sees companies recognising that there are business opportunities in addressing environmental and social challenges, and they begin to integrate sustainability concerns into their operations.

 

In the final ‘proactive’ approach, businesses take responsibility for meeting the needs of future generations, and adopt long-term thinking to anticipate and fulfil these needs.

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Walmart Sustainability Index Goes Live With Over 100,000 Suppliers

Walmart Sustainability Index Goes Live With Over 100,000 Suppliers | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
The Sustainability Leaders badge does not make representations about the environmental or social impact of an individual product, only that the manufacturer has scored well enough to earn a badge across all of the products they make in that category. For example, a television identified with a Sustainability Leaders badge indicates that the manufacturer has been identified as a Sustainability Leader among its peers in the television category for its sustainability management practices.
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

Imagine someday being able to scan a product and hear the story of the life cycle/sustainability of the product--from toxins to transportation fallout. And imagine if you could then see a "sustainability leadership badge" that helps you find sustainability leadership quickly in any category--for example the most sustainably designed TV on the shelf. Well this is soon going to be a reality and soon thousands and thousand of products, companies, and industries will be made more comparable, more transparent, and help make us all more intelligent about sustainable value. And Walmart has set it in motion, already in a big way, with its new "sustainability leaders badge." And I cant wait until it matures to the point where we can sweep our i-Phones over a code and hear the whole story narrated as part of our purchasing experience. It could be revolutionary. 

 

The Sustainability Leaders badge, at this stage of development, does not make representations about the environmental or social impact of an individual product, only that the manufacturer has scored well enough to earn a badge across all of the products they make in that category. For example, a television identified with a Sustainability Leaders badge indicates that the manufacturer has been identified as a Sustainability Leader among its peers in the television category for its sustainability management practices. But this is just the beginning of something that can be remarkable and exactly what all of us need to be more conscious, informed, and inspired about products getting better and better. 

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Morgan Stanley Survey Finds Sustainable Investing Poised for Growth.

Morgan Stanley Survey Finds Sustainable Investing Poised for Growth. | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Over seventy percent of active individual investors (71%) describe themselves as interested in sustainable investing, and nearly two in three (65%) believe sustainable investing will become more prevalent over the next five years, according to a new survey published today by the Morgan Stanley Institute for Sustainable Investing. 
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

“The trajectory for sustainable investing continues to point upward.  What used to be a bifurcated decision – one between investing to make money and giving to do good – is increasingly becoming a blended conversation as investors look to harness the power of the capital markets as a force for positive impact,” said Audrey Choi, Managing Director and CEO of the Institute for Sustainable Investing at Morgan Stanley.  “As sustainable business practices and investment options become more important to investors, the Morgan Stanley Institute for Sustainable Investing is working to drive scalable investment solutions that seek to achieve market-returns that beat the market

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How a Cow Can Help the Climate: Design Inspired Farming Good for Business and Better for the World

How a Cow Can Help the Climate: Design Inspired Farming Good for Business and Better for the World | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Help has arrived in the unlikely form of a dairy farmer from New Zealand named Simon Wallace. Using a technique imported from his homeland, Wallace aims to reverse the process of deforestation and high-carbon cattle rearing that’s prevalent in Brazil and develop island farms amid a sea of wilderness. The technique leverages increased efficiency so that more dairy can be produced from significantly less pasture, reducing pressure to clear wilderness and allowing more native habitat to stand.
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

Design can inspire dairy farming, improve yields, and reverse deforestation. This is the concept of sustainable value creation at its best. Simon Wallace is a CEO creating massive innovation and all of his ideas are open to the world.  What's more, as this article shows, is that his work demonstrates the vast potentials of countries learning and accelerating stories of what works--in this case from New Zealand to Brazil. 

 

According to his company’s rough calculations, if all 32.1 billion liters per year of Brazilian milk were produced with Wallace’s methods, the industry could reduce its land use by 24.5 million hectares—an area the size of Italy. If that land were allowed to return to its native state, it could absorb between 6 billion and 10 billion metric tons of our carbon dioxide emissions. With all of humanity emitting about 40 billion tons per year, and about 15 percent of greenhouse gases worldwide coming from the meat and dairy industry, what happens on this dairy farm could affect all of us.

 

So far, observers are impressed. “If more people follow this model in tropical countries, it can reduce the dairy industry’s impact on the environment,” says Victor Cabrera, a Peruvian-born dairy scientist at the University of Wisconsin who has reviewed Leitíssimo’s numbers. “This is great work; there’s no doubt about it.”

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Dairy changing the equation for sustainable business practices: how one industry is getting it right

Dairy changing the equation for sustainable business practices: how one industry is getting it right | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
The dairy industry’s efforts to implement sustainable business practices – from the farm to the table – were showcased during presentation of the fourth annual U.S. Dairy Sustainability Awards, May 7, in Washington, D.C.
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

I loved the Appreciative Inquiry Summit we did with the entire dairy industry a few years ago. We had 500 farms, universities, food chains and story, and stakeholders of every kind. Shortly after the summit some 15 major initiatives were born and $258 million dollars in support for those initiatives happened. Farms all across the US soon learned that when done with innovation and design thinking, sustainability could create not just less harm for the planet but also new sources of business value. This is when sustainability becomes embedded and when a whole industry participates big shifts are possible. The project was singled out by the White House as one of the most positive industry shifts.  One outcome was the creation of an awards program as spotlighted in this article.  The awards program is part of the U.S. Dairy Sustainability Commitment, an industrywide effort to measure and improve the economic, environmental and social sustainability of the dairy industry. To learn more about the U.S. Dairy Sustainability Awards, the winners and the best practices in place at their operations, visit DairyGood.org.

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Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy® is a forum for the dairy industry to work together pre-competitively to address barriers and opportunities to foster innovation and increase sales. The Innovation Center aligns the collective resources of the industry to offer consumers nutritious dairy products and ingredients, and promote the health of people, communities, the planet and the industry. The Board of Directors for the Innovation Center includes dairy industry leaders representing key farmer organizations, dairy cooperatives, companies, manufacturers and brands. The Innovation Center is staffed by Dairy Management Inc™. VisitUSDairy.com for more information about the Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy.

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Tesla's 38,000 pre-orders for Powerwall: people are hungry for renewables--for hope

Tesla announces 38,000 pre-orders for Powerwall home battery
Elon Musk says response has been "off the hook"
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

People are ready. They want to participate--right from their homes--in the renewable energy transformation. Tesla is getting ready for next year's roll-out of their $30K all electric car--one that will sell like the Toyota Camry. With the model S the majority of new owners also purchase solar panels or other renewable sources--they love putting sunshine in their cars. Zero emissions and economic value to boot. With the powerwall they will also be able to go off grid, if they wish. The excitement is palpable and during Tesla's recent earnings call, CEO Elon Musk just announced that the company has so far taken 38,000 reservations for its Powerwall home battery.


"The response has been overwhelming. Like, crazy," Musk said.


He went on to describe the reception to Tesla Energy's introduction as "crazy off the hook." Tesla has also tallied 2,500 reservations for the PowerPack. Musk said this actually equates to more like 25,000 since reservations averaged around 10 Powerpacks each. "The volume of demand here has just been staggering," he said. "It really feels like, man, the stationary storage demand is just nutty. Like, worldwide, it’s just crazy."


A market analyst recently did an analysis of Tesla's soaring stock value. And his conclusion: Tesla is selling "hope in our future." 


He writes:


"Elon Musk is selling hope.

 

To the vast majority of people today, the future of the world seems bleak. Climate change is real, yet atmospheric carbon levels continue to rise.

 

There are two ways to deal with this without giving into despair. One way is to deny it. Climate change denialism is increasing in intensity even as the crisis deepens. Politicians seem incapable of taking decisive action against this well-funded opposition.

 

The other way to deal with the crisis is to hope for solutions. And that is what Tesla (NASDAQ:TSLA) is offering, hope in the form of electric cars powered by solar energy, energy that can be stored for use at night, creating a more stable electric grid in the process.

 

To skeptics, it seems inconceivable. But people are buying it, with real dollars. That's the lesson of Tesla's first quarter report. People are buying it."




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Moolahonly's curator insight, May 20, 4:34 PM

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80% Of New Jersey’s Electricity From Renewables.

80% Of New Jersey’s Electricity From Renewables. | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
“State senators in New Jersey are proposing legislation that would require the state to produce 80% of its electricity from renewables by 80% Of New Jersey’s Electricity From Renewables? was originally published on CleanTechnica.”
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:
I don't often think of New Jersey as a pace setter...but legislators there are calling for new economy thinking: a bight green economic logic is calling for 80% renewables. Who knows if it can be done, but New Jersey is already a solar power leader in the United States. Thirty-five years is a long time, and it appears that the rate of solar adoption will continue to quicken. Solar power is more affordable than it has ever been. However, most Americans may still not be aware of that fact, and remain attached to the idea that is out of reach. When perception catches up with reality, solar might expand in a way that seems explosive.
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Business and society: ceo's like Doug McMillon fully embrace the multistakeholder view of the firm

Business and society: ceo's like Doug McMillon fully embrace the multistakeholder view of the firm | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
“ In the long term, corporate and societal interests converge. Walmart CEO Doug McMillon and SVP of sustainability Kathleen McLaughlin argue companies have an opportunity to use their scale and expertise to reshape global systems and mitigate complex problems.”
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Bold: How to Go Big (new book by Diamandis and Kotler)

Bold: How to Go Big, Create Wealth and Impact the World

~ Steven Kotler (author) More about this product
List Price: $28.00
Price: $19.01
You Save: $8.99 (32%)

From the coauthors of the New York Times bestseller Abundance comes their much anticipated follow-up: Bold: how to go big, create wealth, and impact the world.

David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

 

When a woman or man in Outer Mongolia answers his or her smartphone, they are using a device a million times cheaper and a thousand times more powerful than a supercomputer from the 1970s. That’s what exponential change looks like in the real world. Now when you combine exponential technologies with the idea of “business as an agent of world benefit” you get CEOs such as Elon Musk, Larry Page, and Naveen Jain.

 

This volume calls them exponential entrepreneurs. Exponential entrepreneurs give us the ability to solve many of the

world’s grandest challenges over the next two to three decades. That
is, we will soon have the power to meet and exceed the basic needs of
every man, woman, and child on the planet. For the first time in
history, this volume demonstrates,  humanity holds the potential to significantly and permanently address our grandest challenges on a global scale..

Thousands of years ago, it was only kings, pharaohs, and emperors who had the ability to solve large- scale problems. Hundreds of years ago, this power expanded to the industrialists who built our transportation systems and financial institutions. But today, the ability to solve such problems has been thoroughly democratized. Right now, and for the first time ever, a passionate and committed individual has access to the technology, minds, and capital required to take on any challenge.

 

Even better, that individual has good reason to take on such
challenges. As we will soon see, the world’s biggest problems are now
the world’s biggest business opportunities. This means, for
exponential entrepreneurs, finding a significant challenge is a
meaningful road to wealth.

 

Ultimately, as they teach at Singularity University—an amazing entrepreneurship program based on exponential thinking—the best way to become a billionaire is to solve a billion-person problem.

 

How about a less that $20 iPAD that will bring education, knowledge, and MOOC courses from the Harvard and University of Tokyo and Indian Institute of Management to every young person on earth?

 

Some business person is likely already designing it!

 

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Germany is a Green Superpower and Deserves Nomination for Nobel Peace Prize

Germany is a Green Superpower and Deserves Nomination for Nobel Peace Prize | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
This is a world-saving achievement. And, happily, as the price fell, the subsidies for new installations also dropped. The Germans who installed solar ended up making money, which is why the program remains popular, except in coal-producing regions. Today, more than 1.4 million German households and cooperatives are generating their own solar/wind electricity. “There are now a thousand energy cooperatives operated by private people,” said the energy economist Claudia Kemfert.
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

Thomas Friedman, just in from meetings in Germany, concludes that the Germany's Energiewende (energy transformation) deserves a Nobel Peace Prize. What the Germans have done in converting almost 30 percent of their electric grid to solar and wind energy from near zero in about 15 years has been a great contribution to the stability of our planet and its climate. The centerpiece of the German Energiewende,  was an extremely generous “feed-in tariff” that made it a no-brainer for Germans to install solar power (or wind) at home and receive a predictable high price for the energy generated off their own rooftops.


Friedman's  prediction is also perceptive: "Germany will be Europe’s first green, solar-powered superpower. Can those attributes coexist in one country, you ask? They’re going to have to."

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World’s Largest Solar PV Plant in Motion in India

World’s Largest Solar PV Plant in Motion in India | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
“A cabinet meeting chaired by the Chief Minister of India’s Madhya Pradesh, Mr Shivraj Singh, has approved the proposal for commissioning the world’s largest solar power plant in the Rewa District.”
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:
It is moving forward: the proposed Solar Park would be the world’s largest solar PV power plant, with a total solar installed capacity of 750 MW. Acquisition of 1,500 hectares of land for the Rs45 billion ($750 million) project is said to be close to completion.
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Seattle Business Owner Will Pay $70,000 Minimum Wage to All Employees

Seattle Business Owner Will Pay $70,000 Minimum Wage to All Employees | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
employees will see their salaries double over the next three years, while Price himself will take a pay cut from $1 million down to $70,000 a year, or minimum wage by his standards.
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

Remember when Henry Ford years ago raised everyone's wages dramatically in his belief that a strong middle class and upward pay mobility would be good for business AND society? Well here is a small company in Seattle doing something similar. And even though small, these kinds of innovations can have large impact as they enter our collective imaginations. A significant percentage of employees at Gravity Payment will see their salaries double over the next three years, while the CEO, Price himself, will take a pay cut from $1 million down to $70,000 a year, or minimum wage by his standards. 

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You Can Now Invest In Solar Bonds Through Your Retirement Account

You Can Now Invest In Solar Bonds Through Your Retirement Account | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Major solar provider SolarCity announced Monday that it was partnering with securities and investment firm Incapital to allow Americans to invest in Solar Bonds through their IRAs or financial advisers.
Solar Bonds, which were created by SolarCity in 2014, are a way for Americans to invest in solar through a bond structure, rather than buying stock in a company.
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

Your retirement account can help generate a worldwide transition to renewable clean energy, and “People are learning that…you can earn good economic returns and do good with your money at the same time.”

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How Girl Meets Dress is capitalising on the demise of ownership

How Girl Meets Dress is capitalising on the demise of ownership | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Girl Meets Dress is a disruptive e-commerce business with a mission to democratise luxury – believing that everybody deserves a Cinderella experience. We provide millions of women with the ability to rent designer dresses and accessories for a fraction of the retail price.
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

People don"t need to own products, but they do want the service and the experience the product provides. This idea is powering the collaborative economy, including cloths. How about making it possible for everyone to go luxury when they want and enable easy access, complete recycling, and radical price reductions? Girl Meets Dress is a disruptive e-commerce business with a mission to democratise luxury – believing that everybody deserves a Cinderella experience. We provide millions of women with the ability to rent designer dresses and accessories for a fraction of the retail price.

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World's Largest 'Vegetable Factory' Revolutionizes Indoor Farming » EcoWatch

World's Largest 'Vegetable Factory' Revolutionizes Indoor Farming » EcoWatch | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
World’s Largest ‘Vegetable Factory’ Revolutionizes Indoor Farming
David Cooperrider & Chris Johnston's insight:

Japanese plant physiologist Shigeharu Shimamura, CEO of Mirai Co., has partnered with GE Japan to make his dream of a water, space and energy efficient indoor farming system a reality, with amazing stats and nutrients: 100-fold increase in productivity per square foot;

Wasted produce down 50%; nutrient rich in 2.5 times faster than conventional outdoor farming. 


By controlling temperature, humidity and irrigation, the farm can also cut its water usage to just one percent of the amount needed by conventional outdoor farming. “What we need to do is not just setting up more days and nights. We want to achieve the best combination of photosynthesis during the day and breathing at night by controlling the lighting and the environment,” says Shimamura. The systems allows the farm to grow nutrient-rich lettuce two-and-a-half times faster than an outdoor farm. Wasted produce is also reduced from around 50 percentdown to just 10 percent of the crop. This means a 100-fold increase in productivity per square foot. The LEDs also last longer than fluorescent lights and consume 40 percent less power.


Read more: The World's Largest Indoor Farm Produces 10,000 Heads of Lettuce a Day in Japan | Inhabitat - Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building 

 

 

http://ecowatch.com/2015/01/28/worlds-largest-indoor-farm/

 

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