Business as an Agent of World Benefit
21.4K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston
onto Business as an Agent of World Benefit
Scoop.it!

100% Renewable Electricity Will Be Achieved In This German State This Year. But that's just the beginning.

100% Renewable Electricity Will Be Achieved In This German State This Year. But that's just the beginning. | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
“Germany’s windiest area, Schleswig-Holstein, will probably achieve “100% renewable electricity” sometime this year. That is, its clean energy production will be able to supply all of its electricity consumption.”
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
This state in Germany is so committed to renewables that they have a masters degree in wind energy production. In addition, their goal is not 100% renewables. It's 300%...Schleswig-Holstein has a goal to generate 300% of its electricity consumption with renewables eventually. They expect to reach 100% this year!
more...
No comment yet.
Business as an Agent of World Benefit
Sustainable design; green economy; csr; sustainable development; Business as an Agent of World Benefit; Appreciative Inquiry; David Cooperrider; CSR
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston
Scoop.it!

The US Is Finally Getting Its First Offshore Wind Farm

The US Is Finally Getting Its First Offshore Wind Farm | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Designing and building spinning fans hundreds of feet tall that stay sutured to the ocean floor in the face of currents and wicked winds has taken almost three years of work.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
For the first time in the history of our emerging alternative energy movement, the US can finally boast that we have an offshore wind farm. The timing couldn’t be better, as we need to harness these great sources of renewable power such as the oceans as much as possible. Deepwater Wind has partnered with General Electric Renewable Energy to build the facility off the coast of Block Island, which is part of Rhode Island. Scheduled to be connected to the grid by the end of 2016, the new system is projected to supply 90% of the power for the tourist destination within the next few years. Deepwater has plans already underway to build a larger wind farm father out to sea with 30 times more power. Other companies are in the process of building off-shore wind farms on both coasts. According to the article, “The Department of Energy estimates that about 80 percent of the country’s power demand comes from coastal states, and it’s pledged up to $40 million to help coastal city-dwellers get their power from closer to home.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston
Scoop.it!

33 Corporations Working On Autonomous Vehicles

33 Corporations Working On Autonomous Vehicles | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Google and Tesla might be the biggest names chasing self-driving cars, but a host of auto brands and other tech heavyweights are also investing heavily in driverless R&D.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Last fall, CBInsights.com published a report listing 25 corporations worldwide that are focused on creating autonomous automobiles, so they are investing heavily in driverless R&D. This brief includes an updated list of 33 auto brands and technology companies – some highly recognizable, others less well-known – and other recent developments in the field. “Private companies working in auto tech are on pace to attract record levels of deals and funding in 2016, with autonomous driving startups leading the charge,” the article states. “As expectations around self-driving vehicles have risen, major corporations have ramped up their own initiatives, racing to deploy technology onto public roads.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston
Scoop.it!

Tesla and Exxon agree, it's time for a carbon tax [Video]

Tesla and Exxon agree, it's time for a carbon tax [Video] | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
At the Gigafactory press event in Nevada last week, Tesla Motors CEO Elon Musk explained, "every oil burning activity is subsidized, dramatically. If you believ
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston
Scoop.it!

Elon Musk’s Gigafactory and the rise of the high-tech, robot-run smart factory: more Ecologically Sustainable, Less Jobs.

Elon Musk’s Gigafactory and the rise of the high-tech, robot-run smart factory: more Ecologically Sustainable, Less Jobs. | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Normally, the shiny, streamlined gadgets, not the huge buildings where they’re made, attract our attention. But increasingly, the technology companies use to create, build, assemble, and ship is getting more and more sophisticated.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
A quarter of all manufacturing tasks will be automated by 2025. Disruptive" has become a cliche in the tech world, but the machines and processes changing manufacturing have the potential to make massive impacts, positive and negative, as they become more and more common. With so many new developments, it’s hard to tell what future factories will look like. But it’s likely they’ll make the process of creating new things as exciting and intriguing the final product.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston
Scoop.it!

Tesla’s Done Being an Automaker—It’s Now an Energy Company

Tesla’s Done Being an Automaker—It’s Now an Energy Company | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Forget "well to wheels." Tesla's talking generation to acceleration.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
'The world does not lack for automotive companies,” Musk said Tuesday. “The world lacks for sustainable energy companies.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston
Scoop.it!

Solar Energy Is Now as Cheap as Fossil Fuels

Solar Energy Is Now as Cheap as Fossil Fuels | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Exponential Finance celebrates the incredible opportunity at the intersection of technology and finance. Apply here to join Singularity University, CNBC, and hundreds of the world’s... read more
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
What if we unite exponential finance with exponential collective action? progress in technology has caused solar prices to drop two hundred times since the 1970s and five times in the last five years alone. Imagine now if our cooperative capacities and collective willpower increased at this kind of exponential rate. We need a Socio-technical science that puts this exponential thinking and practice together.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston
Scoop.it!

It's the end of the fossil fuel era as we know it

It's the end of the fossil fuel era as we know it | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Expect a massive deployment of renewable energy worldwide through 2040, a new report finds.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
A Bloomberg report forecasts a renewable energy rush. The "New Energy Outlook" report, released Monday by Bloomberg, finds that at least $11.4 trillion will be invested in new power-generating capacity over the next 25 years, and 60 percent of that will fund wind and solar power.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston
Scoop.it!

Interface's bold new mission 'Climate Take Back'

Interface's bold new mission 'Climate Take Back' | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Can one company help reverse climate change? The iconoclastic carpet marker's new mission is as audacious as its last mission seemed 22 years ago.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Interface,with a wonderful history, guided by Ray Anderson and Jim Hartzfield, of using the whole system in the room Appreciative Inquiry to create and advance its sustainability initiatives, has now taken a next leap. It's a bold shift, and as this article shows, the call to regeneration of the planet is breathing new life into its innovation agenda--and the vitality of its people. “Climate Take Back,” as the new mission has been named, is the successor to Mission Zero, the name given to a vision articulated in 1997 that, for most outside the company, seemed audacious at the time: “To be the first company that, by its deeds, shows the entire industrial world what sustainability is in all its dimensions: People, process, product, place and profits — by 2020 — and in doing so we will become restorative through the power of influence.” Flourishing enterprise and net positive business has few models. But it's coming...thanks Green Biz for this story.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston
Scoop.it!

What's Next for Toms: the $400 Million Business Built on the Karmic Capital of Giving While Growing Enough to keep Giving

What's Next for Toms: the $400 Million Business Built on the Karmic Capital of Giving While Growing Enough to keep Giving | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
When he founded Toms, Blake Mycoskie reinvented the idea of a company that does well while doing good. So what's next for him? Doing that again.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
When I met with Tom's Shoes founder Blake Mycoskie not too long ago his message to the young students in entrepreneurship was this: start something the matters, and commit to self development, and spiritual retreat. In the 10 years since he founded the Los Angeles-based Toms--whose revenue for the 12 months ending last June 30 was estimated by Moody's to be $392 million--Mycoskie has accumulated enough karmic capital to disappear for a week or two in pursuit of spiritual healing, for example his recent retreat in Fiji. His for-profit company has brightened more than 51 million lives with new shoes, restored vision, clean water, and safe births. Whoever writes the four-decade history of for-profit social ventures will devote a chapter to Toms' pioneering business model.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston
Scoop.it!

Sustainability Is Out, Net Positive Responsible Innovation Is In

Sustainability Is Out, Net Positive Responsible Innovation Is In | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
COPENHAGEN, Denmark — Sustainability is out and responsible innovation is in.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Thanks Chris Laszlo for spotting this one. Again the call for a shift from the idea of "sustainability-as-less-harm" to the concept of net-positive designing for all of life  or  full spectrum "sustainability-as-flourishing"  is the call of the time. This shift is perhaps happening. Consider this commentary from a senior exec at Nike: 

“Whichever way you do the math, incrementalism and efficiency measures won’t get you there. Less bad is not good enough,” said Hannah Jones, Chief Sustainability Officer and VP, Innovation Accelerator of Nike, explaining that the company has set a “moonshot ambition: ‘can we double our business, while halving our impact?’”---well this can't be done unless the system reaches beyond sustainability as less harm to net positive design.  As Jones explained later in an interview: “We have set ourselves some ambitious targets for 2020, but the difference between those targets — what we know we can do — and the moonshot is innovation and system change. Sustainability is an innovation challenge, that creates business model innovation and product innovation. You have to think about different technologies for how you make your products and you have to think about different materials, right the way down to the molecule.” It was a refreshing to hear this point of view from one of the world’s leading apparel companies, and to hear how they are embedding innovation and sustainability right into the design process. “We literally picked up our sustainability team and built it into an advanced innovation function. It became part of the larger advanced innovation effort that Nike has.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston
Scoop.it!

Africa’s economies are growing fast as end of extreme poverty is in sight

Africa’s economies are growing fast as end of extreme poverty is in sight | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
The GDP of 25 African countries is expected to grow 5% annually between now and 2025. How can the continent sustain such high growth?
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
When it comes to big issues like education and poverty, we must all connect and collaborate, with the public and private sector closely working together--in this, the collaborative age. Forward-thinking businesses play a vital role in generating strong economies and building settings that embrace education, technology and innovation. They build the bridge between what students learn in school and the skills that are required in today’s world. Take the example of Africa Code Week, the largest digital literacy initiative ever organized on the African continent. Through this programme, in 2015 alone, 90,000 young people in 17 countries across the continent were introduced to coding. This year, the target is even more ambitious: 150,000 young people across 30 African countries. Without the network of non-profits, governments and corporations working together, this type of programme would not exist. What this demonstrates more than anything is that as with other challenges, this one will only be overcome if everyone is on board. As the African proverb says, “if you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston
Scoop.it!

AeroFarms - An environmental champion, AeroFarms is leading the way to address our global food crisis by growing flavorful, healthy leafy greens in a sustainable and socially responsible way.

AeroFarms - An environmental champion, AeroFarms is leading the way to address our global food crisis by growing flavorful, healthy leafy greens in a sustainable and socially responsible way. | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
An environmental champion, AeroFarms is leading the way to address our global food crisis by growing flavorful, healthy leafy greens in a sustainable and socially responsible way.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Share your insight
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston
Scoop.it!

CEO Adam Lowry on Ripple Effects: Can You Change the World by Changing Breakfast and Business?

CEO Adam Lowry on Ripple Effects: Can You Change the World by Changing Breakfast and Business? | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Adam Lowry, Cofounder of Method and Ripple Foods, discusses how his new non-dairy milk product is made from split yellow peas, how to build a thriving employee culture, and how even the smallest actions (like what you eat for breakfast) can have far reaching impacts.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
The new certified B corporations are fueled by purpose, very skilled entrepreneurship, and the belief that the world is going to be changed by millions of little things --like what you choose to eat for breakfast. So peas for milk? That's what this new company Ripple is doing--building on its concept of ripple effects.   It's creamy, sweet, and—don't worry—tastes nothing like peas--so writes Fast Company.  It's also healthier than some alternatives. While almond milk—which Mother Jones once described as a "jug of filtered water clouded by a handful of ground almonds"—has only a gram of protein, the new pea-based milk has eight grams, the same amount as milk from cows. Ripple's milk also has more potassium and vitamin D... it has a third of the saturated fat and 50% more calcium. Making milk from peas also has a substantially smaller carbon and water footprint. While almonds are grown in California's drought-stricken Central Valley, with heavy doses of both irrigation and fertilizer, peas are mostly grown in the upper Midwest without the need for much of either. Ripple has calculated that its milk takes 96% less water to make than almond milk, 99% less than dairy milk, and 76% less than soy milk. The carbon footprint is 93% smaller than most dairy. But most important part of this taped interview is the CEO Adam Lowry's way of thinking about ripple effects. I love how he is thinking 200 years out. It reminds me of Elise Boulding's concept of the 200 year present, where there are people living today that are over 100 years old, and people being born today that will live to be over 100 years old. 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston
Scoop.it!

This computer will grow your food in the future

This computer will grow your food in the future | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
What if we could grow delicious, nutrient-dense food, indoors anywhere in the world? Caleb Harper, director of the Open Agriculture Initiative at the MIT Media Lab, wants to change the food system by connecting growers with technology. Get to know Harper's "food computers" and catch a glimpse of what the future of farming might look like.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
As Principal Investigator and Director of the Open Agriculture Initiative at MIT’s Media Lab, Caleb Harper leads a group of engineers, architects, urban planners, economists and plant scientists in the exploration and development of high performance urban agricultural systems. In this TED Talk, he details how he plans to enhance our food system by getting growers more closely connected with technology. He discusses his concept of a “food democracy” and how his food computers innovation could reshape the future of farming and what we eat.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston
Scoop.it!

Which is the greenest, happiest country in the world?

Which is the greenest, happiest country in the world? | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
One country is achieving the right balance between well-being and environmental sustainability, according to the Happy Planet Index 2016.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
The greenest happiest country in the world has life expectancy beyond, for example, the US, and it uses less than half the resources per capita, and it has abolished its military and has a national peace academy instead of a military academy. It is Costa Rica. Gallup poll found the Central American nation to have the highest level of well-being in the world. It also has some of the longest-lived people: life expectancy there is 78.5 years – older than in the US. But what places the country time and again at the top of the index is that it delivers all this health and happiness while using a mere quarter of the resources that are typically used in the Western world. How does it do that? Chiefly through a strong commitment to the environment: 99% of the country’s electricity supply is said to come from renewable sources, and the government has pledged to make the country carbon neutral by 2021. Other factors include robust investing in social programmes such as health and education, with public money that has been all the more plentiful since the abolition of the national army in 1949.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston
Scoop.it!

You’ll Never Believe How Cheap New Solar Power Is: In Search of the Miraculous.

You’ll Never Believe How Cheap New Solar Power Is: In Search of the Miraculous. | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
If it surprises you that U.S. solar has jumped 100-fold in the last decade -- and prices are now under 4 cents per kilowatt-hour -- you should read this.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
If you are looking for one chart to sum up the whole solar energy miracle, Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF) Chairman Michael Liebreich has one from his keynote address at BNEF’s annual conference in April titled “In Search of the Miraculous”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston
Scoop.it!

The Desalination Era Is Here

The Desalination Era Is Here | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
One of the driest countries on Earth now makes more freshwater than it needs
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Israel has more water than it needs. The turnaround started in 2007, when low-flow toilets and showerheads were installed nationwide and the national water authority built innovative water treatment systems that recapture 86 percent of the water that goes down the drain and use it for irrigation — vastly more than the second-most-efficient country in the world, Spain, which recycles 19 percent. But even with those measures, Israel still needed about 1.9 billion cubic meters (2.5 billion cubic yards) of freshwater per year and was getting just 1.4 billion cubic meters (1.8 billion cubic yards) from natural sources. That 500-million-cubic-meter (650-million-cubic-yard) shortfall was why the Sea of Galilee was draining like an unplugged tub and why the country was about to lose its farms. Enter desalination. The Ashkelon plant, in 2005, provided 127 million cubic meters (166 million cubic yards) of water. Hadera, in 2009, put out another 140 million cubic meters (183 million cubic yards). And now Sorek, 150 million cubic meters (196 million cubic yards). All told, desal plants can provide some 600 million cubic meters (785 million cubic yards) of water a year, and more are on the way. The Sea of Galilee is fuller. Israel’s farms are thriving. And the country faces a previously unfathomable question: What to do with its extra water?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston
Scoop.it!

Machine Money and People Money?

Machine Money and People Money - What's The Future of Work? - Medium
A Conversation about Universal Basic Income with John Maynard Keynes and Paul Buchheit
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
The numbers of people in extreme poverty continues to fall more quickly than ever before in world history. As Max Roser, creator of Our World in Data, notes: “Even in 1981 more than 50% of the world population lived in absolute poverty — this is now down to about 14%. This is still a large number of people, but the change is happening incredibly fast. For our present world, the data tells us that poverty is now falling more quickly than ever before in world history.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston
Scoop.it!

Hole in ozone layer is closing and will be 'healed' by 2055

Hole in ozone layer is closing and will be 'healed' by 2055 | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
The hole in the Antarctic ozone layer is beginning to close, scientists have discovered.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Welcome to the Age of Regeneration. When humankind cooperates the biosphere heals. New findings, published today in the journal Science, show that the average size of the ozone hole each September has shrunk by more than 1.7 million square miles since 2000 – about 18 times the area of the United Kingdom. This is a global achievement and example of supercooperation.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston
Scoop.it!

Eat Your Spoon. Abandon Plastic.

Eat Your Spoon. Abandon Plastic. | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
An Indian startup sells edible spoons that taste just like crackers, made out of millet, rice and wheat. The company's founder says it's a fun way to encourage people to reduce their plastic waste.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Bakey's, a new startup in India, wants to end the practice of plastic spoons. Instead of landfill, why not fill your stomach. The edible utensils come in three flavors — plain, sweet (baked with a bit of sugar) and savory (seasoned rock salt, black pepper, cardamom and cumin). For those with a gluten intolerance, Bakey's substitutes the wheat with barley and corn. The ingredients are all sourced from local farmers, the creator Peesapaty says. These spoons have a shelf life of three years and can decompose within days after use — if they're not eaten, that is. And because they're baked at high heat and contain very little moisture, Peesapaty says, it takes about 10 minutes of soaking before the spoons start to dissolve in yogurt or soup. Wish we could get them here in the U.S. Imagine what a hit they would be if they were both nutritious and delicious and based on regenerative farming practices!
more...
Coline Mionnet's curator insight, July 8, 5:27 AM
"Mangez vos cuillères. Abandonnez le plastique."
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston
Scoop.it!

How Cisco Is Using Its Unique Capabilities to Drive Breakthroughs in Circular Economy

How Cisco Is Using Its Unique Capabilities to Drive Breakthroughs in Circular Economy | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
As the world’s largest designer, manufacturer and seller of networking equipment, Cisco Systems faces many supply chain sustainability issues, including energy, waste and climate change impacts, among others. To address these challenges, Cisco has worked to improve energy efficiency, implemented circular economic methods to turn waste into resources and recently announced a new goal to avoid one million metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions from its supply chain operations by 2020.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Imagine if every company would take what they are best at--in Cisco's case it is digitization--and turned it loose on sustainable design innovation--and then connected the dots with others' strengths, for a concentration effect at a super cooperation level. Why not? Tesla has already given away its IP. For cisco's Kathleen Shaver, sustainability "is" our foundational commitment to act in a socially and environmentally responsible manner. It also encompasses our intent to lead in areas that are aligned to our business — areas where we can use our unique capabilities to drive breakthrough positive outcomes on a broad scale. Presently we’re focusing major efforts in three key areas: Driving respect for human rights throughout the supply chain Reducing carbon impacts of manufacturing and logistics practices Building on circular-economy initiatives, including enhancing product design and increasing take back
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston
Scoop.it!

Portugal runs for four days straight on renewable energy alone

Portugal runs for four days straight on renewable energy alone | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Zero emission milestone reached as country is powered by just wind, solar and hydro-generated electricity for 107 hours
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
This is soon to be commonplace. But it's still good news! Portugal kept its lights on with renewable energy alone for four consecutive days last week in a clean energy milestone revealed by data analysis of national energy network figures. Electricity consumption in the country was fully covered by solar, wind and hydro power in an extraordinary 107-hour run that lasted from 6.45am on Saturday 7 May until 5.45pm the following Wednesday, the analysis says. News of the zero emissions landmark comes just days after Germany announced that clean energy had powered almost all its electricity needs on Sunday 15 May, with power prices turning n
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston
Scoop.it!

Changing the Narrative — Acumen: Ideas — Medium

Changing the Narrative - Acumen: Ideas - Medium
There are 2.5 billion people on earth without access to a toilet.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Acumen is addressing escape from poverty with the quest for  sustainablility+ flourishing economy. Seth Godwin writes about it too: "Poverty is not just real life but without money. Not if you define “real life” as the life you live right now. The non-poverty life is about possibility. The possibility of connection, of leveling up, of a tomorrow that’s significantly better than yesterday. No, the thing that’s possible doesn’t always happen, not for most people, but living with hope is something we take for granted. A life lived in poverty, though, is always about scrambling. A life lived in poverty is about another kind of possibility, the very real possibility that there will be no food tomorrow, no shelter, no emergency health care for the children. It’s always about scrambling, about the risk. Day after day, week after week, year after year, a life lived in poverty corrodes the people who have to endure it. It erases hope, self-respect and even fleeting moments of peace of mind. Cursed with poverty, people (not simply people, they are our relatives, our distant cousins, friends of friends, people just a few handshakes away in the global network in which we are all connected) waste opportunities because they cannot see them. Poverty is an iron ceiling, a ceiling four feet off the ground, a ceiling that forces those who live with poverty to spend their days hunched over, on the edge of fear and humiliation. 

 Poverty is often part of a system, not an event. A catastrophe can introduce poverty to a village or a family. But too often, poverty is generational, systemic and amplified by some of the very forces designed to eradicate it. Those in poverty are likely to raise children prepared to live in poverty as well. It’s no surprise when parents are unable to educate, to breathe and to hope for much, they often create a cycle inherited by their children. Worse, the system of poverty isolates people from markets. When there is no access to productivity, to education, to efficiency, the poverty gets worse." 

For more see Kyle Westaway's weekend briefing--it's always  worthwhile!  https://weekendbriefing.com/subscribe/

 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston
Scoop.it!

Ray Kurzweil Sees Huge Solar Industry Success In 12 Years –We are on an Exponential Path and Can Go Even Faster

Ray Kurzweil Sees Huge Solar Industry Success In 12 Years –We are on an Exponential Path and Can Go Even Faster | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
“In 2012, solar panels were producing 0.5% of the world’s energy supply. Some people dismissed it, saying, ‘It’s a nice thing to do, but at a half percent, it’s a fringe player. That’s not going to solve the problem,’” Kurzweil said. “They were ignoring the exponential growth just as they ignored the exponential growth of the Internet and genome project. Half a percent is only eight doublings away from 100%.

“Now it is four years later, [and solar] has doubled twice again. Now solar panels produce 2% of the world’s energy, right on schedule. People dismiss it, ‘2%. Nice, but a fringe player.’ That ignores the exponential growth, which means it is only six doublings or [12] years from 100%.”

And of the sun … two years ago, Kurzweil responded to a question from the Prime Minister of Israel that went like this: “Ray, do we have enough sunlight to do this with a doubling seven more times?” Kurzweil” “Yes. After we double seven more times and meeting 100% of the world’s energy needs, we’ll still be using only one part in 10,000 of the sunlight that we have.”
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
We are not running out of energy if we choose renewables. We can be 100% renewable energy in perhaps 12 years. We can even accelerate the transition from a fossil fuel economy to a renewable energy economy even faster if we put our collective attention on it and could find our way to a new magnitude of collective willpower. In Snyder's hope theory there are two dimensions to the kind of hope that propels positive change: willpower and waypower. And as it relates to many of our world economy transitions willpower is important but may be overrated.  Waypower--making it easy like a habit, economically valuable, and, and technically realistic--might be the pathway to increasing the world's willpower.  If this is even partially true--that exponential waypower  can lead to exponential  increases in in collective willpower (nurtured by a consciousness of connection  and reverence for life) --and if we can elevate the two at once and together--we might well find ourselves in a green golden age. Ray Kurzweil focuses on the waypower side of the equation by exploring the concept of doubling, because that's what happening in the solar arena. What if techno-optimism were united with spiritual strength and what Albert Schweitzer called "reverence for life."   

“In 2012, solar panels were producing 0.5% of the world’s energy supply. Some people dismissed it, saying, ‘It’s a nice thing to do, but at a half percent, it’s a fringe player. That’s not going to solve the problem,’” Kurzweil said. “They were ignoring the exponential growth just as they ignored the exponential growth of the Internet and genome project. Half a percent is only eight doublings away from 100%. “Now it is four years later, [and solar] has doubled twice again. Now solar panels produce 2% of the world’s energy, right on schedule. People dismiss it, ‘2%. Nice, but a fringe player.’ That ignores the exponential growth, which means it is only six doublings or [12] years from 100%.” And of the sun … two years ago, Kurzweil responded to a question from the Prime Minister of Israel that went like this: “Ray, do we have enough sunlight to do this with a doubling seven more times?” Kurzweil” “Yes. After we double seven more times and meeting 100% of the world’s energy needs, we’ll still be using only one part in 10,000 of the sunlight that we have.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston
Scoop.it!

Blog

Blog | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Cathy Clark, Head of the Center for the Advancement of Social Entrepreneurship (CASE) at Duke University, discusses best practices from some of the world's most successful impact investors, across asset classes, geographies and areas of impact. She also describes a number of tools that are available to those who are eager to engage in the new era of Collaborative Capitalism.
more...
No comment yet.