Business as an Agent of World Benefit
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10 leading sustainability innovations

10 leading sustainability innovations | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
“A new study released today profiles 100 leading sustainability innovations - we showcase the top 10, featuring carbon-neutral plastic, recycling kiosks and an ethical smartphone (10 leading sustainability innovations - The Guardian”
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
A study released today profiles 100 leading sustainability innovations. We showcase the top 10, featuring carbon-neutral plastic, e-waste recycling kiosks and an ethical smartphone. What's missing here are whole sets of other kinds of innovations. These are all product or technical innovations. But what about process innovations? Business model innovations? Management innovations? Social inventions? And even markets innovations? If we are to make a massive shift to a sustainable + full spectrum flourishing world we need a larger focus on a much fuller spectrum of innovation. This is a good start.
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Business as an Agent of World Benefit
Sustainable design; green economy; csr; sustainable development; Business as an Agent of World Benefit; Appreciative Inquiry; David Cooperrider; CSR
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Ray Kurzweil Sees Huge Solar Industry Success In 12 Years –We are on an Exponential Path and Can Go Even Faster

Ray Kurzweil Sees Huge Solar Industry Success In 12 Years –We are on an Exponential Path and Can Go Even Faster | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
“In 2012, solar panels were producing 0.5% of the world’s energy supply. Some people dismissed it, saying, ‘It’s a nice thing to do, but at a half percent, it’s a fringe player. That’s not going to solve the problem,’” Kurzweil said. “They were ignoring the exponential growth just as they ignored the exponential growth of the Internet and genome project. Half a percent is only eight doublings away from 100%.

“Now it is four years later, [and solar] has doubled twice again. Now solar panels produce 2% of the world’s energy, right on schedule. People dismiss it, ‘2%. Nice, but a fringe player.’ That ignores the exponential growth, which means it is only six doublings or [12] years from 100%.”

And of the sun … two years ago, Kurzweil responded to a question from the Prime Minister of Israel that went like this: “Ray, do we have enough sunlight to do this with a doubling seven more times?” Kurzweil” “Yes. After we double seven more times and meeting 100% of the world’s energy needs, we’ll still be using only one part in 10,000 of the sunlight that we have.”
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
We are not running out of energy if we choose renewables. We can be 100% renewable energy in perhaps 12 years. We can even accelerate the transition from a fossil fuel economy to a renewable energy economy even faster if we put our collective attention on it and could find our way to a new magnitude of collective willpower. In Snyder's hope theory there are two dimensions to the kind of hope that propels positive change: willpower and waypower. And as it relates to many of our world economy transitions willpower is important but may be overrated.  Waypower--making it easy like a habit, economically valuable, and, and technically realistic--might be the pathway to increasing the world's willpower.  If this is even partially true--that exponential waypower  can lead to exponential  increases in in collective willpower (nurtured by a consciousness of connection  and reverence for life) --and if we can elevate the two at once and together--we might well find ourselves in a green golden age. Ray Kurzweil focuses on the waypower side of the equation by exploring the concept of doubling, because that's what happening in the solar arena. What if techno-optimism were united with spiritual strength and what Albert Schweitzer called "reverence for life."   

“In 2012, solar panels were producing 0.5% of the world’s energy supply. Some people dismissed it, saying, ‘It’s a nice thing to do, but at a half percent, it’s a fringe player. That’s not going to solve the problem,’” Kurzweil said. “They were ignoring the exponential growth just as they ignored the exponential growth of the Internet and genome project. Half a percent is only eight doublings away from 100%. “Now it is four years later, [and solar] has doubled twice again. Now solar panels produce 2% of the world’s energy, right on schedule. People dismiss it, ‘2%. Nice, but a fringe player.’ That ignores the exponential growth, which means it is only six doublings or [12] years from 100%.” And of the sun … two years ago, Kurzweil responded to a question from the Prime Minister of Israel that went like this: “Ray, do we have enough sunlight to do this with a doubling seven more times?” Kurzweil” “Yes. After we double seven more times and meeting 100% of the world’s energy needs, we’ll still be using only one part in 10,000 of the sunlight that we have.”
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Blog

Blog | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Cathy Clark, Head of the Center for the Advancement of Social Entrepreneurship (CASE) at Duke University, discusses best practices from some of the world's most successful impact investors, across asset classes, geographies and areas of impact. She also describes a number of tools that are available to those who are eager to engage in the new era of Collaborative Capitalism.
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Christiana Figueres: turning skepticism into optimism

Christiana Figueres: turning skepticism into  optimism | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
What would you do if your job was to save the planet? When Christiana Figueres was tapped by the UN to lead the Paris climate conference (COP 21) in December 2015, she reacted the way many people would: she thought it would be impossible to bring the leaders of 195 countries into agreement on how to slow climate change. Find out how she turned her skepticism into optimism -- and helped the world achieve the most important climate agreement in history.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
To say something is impossible is not a fact: it's a state of mind. That's the leadership lesson Christiana Figueres--the person who was tapped to lead the Paris conference--teaches all of us.
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Why Google, Ikea Say ‘The Paris Effect’ Is Boosting Business · Environmental Leader · Environmental Management News

Why Google, Ikea Say ‘The Paris Effect’ Is Boosting Business · Environmental Leader · Environmental Management News | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Earlier this month Google, along with fellow tech companies Amazon, Apple and Microsoft filed a court brief defending the Clean Power Plan, which they say will reduce electricity prices by stimulating more renewable investments and “long-term price certainty.”

In tandem with the We Mean Business report, 110 companies, including Ikea, Mars Incorporated, PG&E, Salesforce, General Mills, Kellogg Company, HP, and Starbucks, released a statement organized by a coalition of groups, including the nonprofit sustainability organization Ceres (also a member of We Mean Business), that calls on for “swift implementation” of the Clean Power Plan and related low-carbon policies. “Implementing the Paris Agreement will enable and encourage businesses and investors to turn the billions of dollars in low-carbon investments we have seen so far into the trillions…” it says.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Tomorrow — on Earth Day — more than 160 countries including the US will sign the Paris climate agreement. In advance of the signing, thousands of businesses are urging governments to enact policies that support a low-carbon economy, which they say presents a multi-trillion-dollar economic opportunity. Yesterday the We Mean Business coalition, made up of companies, investors, business- and climate-advocacy groups, released an analysis of what the Paris agreement means for business. It says national climate plans under the Paris deal represent at least a $13.5 trillion market through 2030 — and that’s just for the energy sector in efficiency and low-carbon technologies. 

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Four Reasons Why The Most Successful People Are Great Collaborators

Specialized knowledge doesn't go very far all on its own.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Humans have benefited from collaboration for many millennia. Working together was the foundation for forming organizations and businesses in the first place. Moreover, as this article points out, putting “our proverbial heads together” is the most productive way to acquire and apply new insights. “It doesn’t matter how smart or savvy we are when it comes to technology, product development or any single skill we possess,” the author writes. “Nobody succeeds for long in a silo. Whatever our ventures – personal, professional, philanthropic, political or private – we can’t forget all the people who are involved in and essential to success. That’s something that highly successful people know and internalize.”
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Tesla Model 3 opening weekend was bigger than Star Wars

Tesla Model 3 opening weekend was bigger than Star Wars | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
The Tesla Model 3 was a massive blockbuster megahit this weekend. Inc. Magazine reported that, "over the weekend, 276,000 people plunked down $1,000 to reserve one. CEO Elon Musk mentioned that the average selling price is $42,000 (with a base price of $35,000), which means the total haul will be around $12B. In terms of actual incoming cash flow, that's $276M for a car that few of us have actually driven. That's also bigger than the Star Wars: The Force Awakens opening weekend at $246M."
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Bucky Fuller once said: "You never change things by fighting existing reality. To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete.” 

We are seeing this happen in front of our eyes. The Tesla 3 will become the iconic symbol of the end of the fossil fuel car. Already 276000 people have put their pre-order in. And they have not even seen the car!  Yes imaginative and esthetic design thinking is part of equation. But the real excitement is being part of a company with a Purpose that is about changing the world and taking action to build a brighter-greener economy. And what's also telling is over half the people that buy a Tesla also invest in solar. I feels good to put sunshine into your vehicle. And now the costs are coming down dramatically, on all of it. There was a book title once called "The Great Game of Business" where Jack Stack called for complete open book management, where every employee is treated as an owner of the business--as part of "the inner circle of strategy." He said the reason this fully democratic model of business works is because business is fun, and can be an inspiration. Well if you combine open book management with a high purpose company like Tesla that is electrifying the the renewable energy age, you will begin to see the future in the texture of the actual. To me it is a mystery why every company is not pursuing a "mighty purpose" in ways that will elevate the engagement of all stakeholders, and makes motivation authentic--where it is simply intrinsic for every person. The new story of business is happening. And it's exciting to to read about it.     
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Is Cognitive Capitalism About To Transform Everything?

Is Cognitive Capitalism About To Transform Everything? | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Without us noticing, we are entering the postcapitalist era. At the heart of further change to come is information technology, new ways of working and the sharing economy. The old ways will take a long while to disappear, but it’s time to be utopian
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Could it be that the great cultural contradiction of capitalism is no longer between labor and capital but between hierarchies and networks? This interesting article attempts to make sense of the times we are in, and asks us all to imagine beyond to the post capitalist possibilities of information abundance, instant interconnections, and the nature of value creation. During and right after the second world war, economists viewed information simply as a “public good”. The US government even decreed that no profit should be made out of patents, only from the production process itself. Then we began to understand intellectual property. In 1962, Kenneth Arrow, the guru of mainstream economics, said that in a free market economy the purpose of inventing things is to create intellectual property rights. He noted: “precisely to the extent that it is successful there is an underutilisation of information.” You can observe the truth of this in every e-business model ever constructed: monopolise and protect data, capture the free social data generated by user interaction, push commercial forces into areas of data production that were non-commercial before, mine the existing data for predictive value – always and everywhere ensuring nobody but the corporation can utilise the results. If we restate Arrow’s principle in reverse, its revolutionary implications are obvious: if a free market economy plus intellectual property leads to the “underutilisation of information”, then an economy based on the full utilisation of information cannot tolerate the free market or absolute intellectual property rights. The business models of all our modern digital giants are designed to prevent the abundance of information. Yet information is abundant. Information goods are freely replicable. Once a thing is made, it can be copied/pasted infinitely. A music track or the giant database you use to build an airliner has a production cost; but its cost of reproduction falls towards zero. Therefore, if the normal price mechanism of capitalism prevails over time, its price will fall towards zero, too.
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People, Planet and Profit: 72 Million Millennials as the Workforce Majority by 2020

People, Planet and Profit: 72 Million Millennials as the Workforce Majority by 2020 | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it

A Company Where Women Thrive, PricewaterhouseCoopers, is actively updating their corporate culture to meet the rapidly changing workplace needs of millennials, despite being a more than 100-year-old organization. PwC Human Talent Transformation Leader Ann Donovan sat down with President Larson and Bloomberg Radio to discuss the bottom line impact this has for a global company.

"Millennials want to know that we as a business have a purpose, that there's meaning to what we're doing and we're contributing to society. And they want to see it. They don't want just want rhetoric," PDonovan said.

David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Millennials place huge importance on the social good ideals of The Triple Bottom Line...so much so that they're transforming workplaces at companies large and small. In fact, according to Bentley's PreparedU Project, 86 percent of millennials agree that it's a priority for them to work for companies that are socially responsible and ethical. 

This is particularly significant because there are 72 million millennials who will be the workforce majority by 2020. - See more at: http://www.bentley.edu/prepared/people-planet-and-profit-highlights-bentley-on-bloomberg#sthash.qsU8Qura.dpuf
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This country isn't just reducing carbon to a net-neutral -- here the economy is aiming for net positive.

This country isn't just reducing carbon to a net-neutral -- here the economy is aiming for net positive. | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Deep in the Himalayas, on the border between China and India, lies the Kingdom of Bhutan, which has pledged to remain carbon neutral for all time.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
When common logic says that building a sustainability+ world will impose economic hardship, the logical conclusion would be that the poorest nations with the most economic hardship would be the last place to look for world-leading innovations. But this is not true. Wealth is about well-being. 

Here, in this video, the Prime Minister of Bhutan speaks to the primary aim of the country and economy: to contribute to full spectrum flourishing or happiness. With humility, humor, and joy the Prime Minister of the country reminds us that development with values is the key to breakthrough innovation--it's about human intention.       
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Exceptional Entrepreneurs Put E-Motion--Energy in Motion--by Linking Success and Significance

Exceptional Entrepreneurs Put E-Motion--Energy in Motion--by Linking Success and Significance | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
The desire to make a positive difference in the world, not simply the desire to be rich, is what distinguishes people driven to succeed.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Serving a Purpose That Makes a Positive Difference is the Difference This article makes a distinction between success and significance. For entrepreneurs, says the author: "Success is one thing, and for the exceptionally motivated it is a great thing, but what is even more important to these individuals is having an impact. They are driven by a deeper emotional component of serving a purpose larger than themselves. Having an impact is what drives the desire to turn their purpose into a crusade. For this reason, they are willing to suffer, sacrifice and succeed as long as their success brings value. It is their primary motivation to be free in advancing their own lives and those of others. It is their desire to live uninhibited and to express and fulfill their purpose. It is this deeply felt purpose which drives their motivation. They seek to leave a legacy of great significance."
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The top 10 sources of data for international development research

The top 10 sources of data for international development research | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Where should you go if you want reliable, detailed data on fragile states, land grabs or trade deals?
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
According to the book The Great Surge...WE LIVE AT A TIME of the Greatest Development Progress among the Global poor in the history of the world. Never before have so many people, in so many developing countries, made so much progress in so short a time in reducing poverty, increasing incomes, improving health, reducing conflict and war, and spreading democracy. And our capacity to track all of this is getting better and better. For example the Human Development Index. What’s it good for? If you want a holistic ranking of progress of a country on human development, the HDI provides a good benchmark. It brings together gross national income (GNI) per capita with life expectancy, and high-level education indicators, into a useful index for international comparisons. But the dataset behind the high-level index is much more detailed. Again, from the fascinating volume The Great Surge, "Since the early 1990s, 1 billion people have been lifted out of extreme poverty. The average income for hundreds of millions of people in dozens of poor countries has more than doubled, 6 million fewer children die every year from disease, war and violence have declined significantly, average life expectancy has increased by six years, tens of millions more girls are in school, the share of people living in chronic hunger has been cut nearly in half, millions more people have access to clean water, and democracy—often fragile and imperfect—has become the norm rather than the exception in developing countries around the world."
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When, why, and how does greater good purpose drive breakaway business success? 

Kyle Westaway says: 


"We see the world as it could be. We resolve to make change happen. Not content to wait for better times, we strive to lay foundations now. We know that a brighter future is built by the adventurers, people like you and me, who are on the ground charting new territory, motivated by passion and obsessed with execution.

We believe in the power of the marketplace to create positive social and environmental change. We believe the world’s most complex challenges have financially sustainable solutions. We believe the people who design these solutions are driven by long-term prosperity, not only financial but also social and environmental.

We are in this together."

David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Kyle Westaway is an example of a possibility theorist--a thinker who sees the world as it could be, and a builder of prospective theory, not just about the past or backward looking, but conceptual work that generative and forward looking. 

In his book--Profit & Purpose: How Social Innovation Is Transforming Business for Good-- Kyle asks why has Warby Parker been able to make such dramatic inroads against the behemoths in the long established eyeglass market? How has Method revolutionized the soap aisle? Amid the cacophony of online retailers, why has Etsy seen such explosive growth, with 2013 annual sales north of $1 billion? These companies all have been disruptive because they are operating from a strong social/environmental purpose. They are proving a counterintuitive truth - purpose can drive profits. But it's not just innovative startups that are getting in on the action. Blue chip companies such as Nike, Coca-Cola and IBM are innovating within their organization to create a positive social and environmental impact globally. This is not a trend. It's the future of business. 

Based on in-depth interviews with founders, Profit & Purpose profiles a number of the most successful pioneers of this new way forward, telling the stories of thirteen social enterprises ranging from non-profits like Charity: Water and DonorsChoose.org, to for-profits, like Method and Burts Bees; from startups like Etsy and Warby Parker, to multinational corporations with market capitalizations in the hundreds of billions, like Coca-Cola, IBM and Nike. Kyle Westaway digs beneath the public stories of these organizations' success to reveal how they have harness the power of purpose. Taking readers behind the scenes, he shows how these leading social enterprises progressed from concept to scale, how they overcame common pitfalls, and how they managed to find an optimal balance between their mission and their business mandates. Westaway reveals that though there is no magic bullet formula that guarantees success, there are seven core practices that distinguish these market leaders from the pack of contenders. 

They are: DISCOVER THROUGH CURIOSITY // Finding the right opportunity catalyzes impact. DESIGN WITH HUMILiTY // Prioritizing users creates killer products. BUILD THROUGH HUSTLE // Rallying people creates critical momentum for launch. FUND BY COMMITMENT // Aligning funders around a vision creates true partnerships. CONNECT WITH AUTHENTICITY // Authentic connection builds a movement. SCALE THROUGH COMMUNITY // Focusing on culture ensures smart growth. EVALUATE WITH HONESTY // Honest measurement ensures continual improvement. 

Profit & Purpose takes the literature on social entrepreneurship an important step forward, providing the practical tools for turning good intentions into breakaway success.
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What is a "Positive Institution"? 

Can global capital markets become catalysts for social change? According to investment expert Audrey Choi, individuals own almost half of all globa
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
What is a positive institution? In previous articles Lindsey Godwin and I have defined positive institutions, theoretically, by building upon the conceptual lens of the positive psychology of human strengths (see https://www.viacharacter.org/www/). Can we design and work with institutions not as clients but as "the change agents" to magnify our highest human strengths  outward into the world as a force for world benefit? How about designing institutions for magnifying the human character strength of wisdom into the world? Or the human strengths of courage, social intelligence, love, sense of humanity, or curiosity and love of learning? Instead of running away from big institutions shouldn't we all be running toward them--if our goal is to build a better world in our society of organizations? Positive institutions are, as we define them, "organizations and structured practices in culture or society that serve to elevate and develop our highest human strengths, combine and magnify those strengths, and refract our highest strengths outward in world benefiting ways leading, ultimately, to a world of full-spectrum flourishing. (Cooperrider and Godwin, 2014)"  

Now, for the logical stretch--how about the $290 trillion dollars in our global capital markets--as a prime time example of the concept of positive institutions? Just as tankers leave big wakes in the ocean, might global capital markets, as an institution, become one of the most positive forces for good on the planet? And how might we make it so? 

Can global capital markets become the institutional catalysts for positive social elevation of human strengths? According to Morgan Stanley investment expert Audrey Choi, individuals own almost half of all global capital, giving them (us!) the power to make a difference by investing in companies that champion social values and sustainability. 

"We have more opportunity today than ever before to make choices," she says. "So change your perspective. Invest in the change you want to see in the world."  And watch this articulate video.   
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AeroFarms - An environmental champion, AeroFarms is leading the way to address our global food crisis by growing flavorful, healthy leafy greens in a sustainable and socially responsible way.

AeroFarms - An environmental champion, AeroFarms is leading the way to address our global food crisis by growing flavorful, healthy leafy greens in a sustainable and socially responsible way. | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
An environmental champion, AeroFarms is leading the way to address our global food crisis by growing flavorful, healthy leafy greens in a sustainable and socially responsible way.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
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CEO Adam Lowry on Ripple Effects: Can You Change the World by Changing Breakfast and Business?

CEO Adam Lowry on Ripple Effects: Can You Change the World by Changing Breakfast and Business? | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Adam Lowry, Cofounder of Method and Ripple Foods, discusses how his new non-dairy milk product is made from split yellow peas, how to build a thriving employee culture, and how even the smallest actions (like what you eat for breakfast) can have far reaching impacts.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
The new certified B corporations are fueled by purpose, very skilled entrepreneurship, and the belief that the world is going to be changed by millions of little things --like what you choose to eat for breakfast. So peas for milk? That's what this new company Ripple is doing--building on its concept of ripple effects.   It's creamy, sweet, and—don't worry—tastes nothing like peas--so writes Fast Company.  It's also healthier than some alternatives. While almond milk—which Mother Jones once described as a "jug of filtered water clouded by a handful of ground almonds"—has only a gram of protein, the new pea-based milk has eight grams, the same amount as milk from cows. Ripple's milk also has more potassium and vitamin D... it has a third of the saturated fat and 50% more calcium. Making milk from peas also has a substantially smaller carbon and water footprint. While almonds are grown in California's drought-stricken Central Valley, with heavy doses of both irrigation and fertilizer, peas are mostly grown in the upper Midwest without the need for much of either. Ripple has calculated that its milk takes 96% less water to make than almond milk, 99% less than dairy milk, and 76% less than soy milk. The carbon footprint is 93% smaller than most dairy. But most important part of this taped interview is the CEO Adam Lowry's way of thinking about ripple effects. I love how he is thinking 200 years out. It reminds me of Elise Boulding's concept of the 200 year present, where there are people living today that are over 100 years old, and people being born today that will live to be over 100 years old. 
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The World In Extreme Transition: Time for Net Positive Regenerative Design on a Scale We Can Scarcely Imagine

The World In Extreme Transition: Time for Net Positive Regenerative  Design on a Scale We Can Scarcely Imagine | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Moving from Sustainability to Regenerative Design
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
On Earth Day people all over the world are beginning to unite around the sense that we are entering a time of extreme transition and that getting "from here" to "there" is going to call for more innovation than we've ever imagined. Imagine if the economy were re-invented to be completely re-generative? The last few hundred years, since the Industrial Revolution, were a telescoped process. During this time, humanity overcame local boundaries and became a globally interconnected species — in a sense, a super-organism. We continuously transform our physical environment to satisfy our needs and desires. Imperialism, colonialism, neoliberalism, capitalism, industrialization, and even communism are all transitional systems. They meshed humanity together, crudely and brutally, connecting the entire species through networks of communication and infrastructure. We now require a rapid transition — what the philosopher William Irwin Thompson called a shift from the “globalization of civilization” to the “planetization of consciousness.” As difficult as it is to imagine, we must overcome the blind spots in our ideologies and belief systems. We must find the path that leads to a supercooperative and supercreative alignment of the strengths of humanity. This requires defining a new form of political economy that supports the net positive regeneration of the Earth’s ecosystems, while allowing every human being to live in the best way. It also means defining a new relationship to technology and innovation. What if every part of our living economy was radically, not just incrementally, regenerative? What a design assignment! As Alex Steffen once wrote in his book WorldChanging:

“So here we are. We need, in the next twenty-five years or so, to do something never before done. We need to consciously re-design the entire material basis of our civilization. The model we replace it with must be drastically more ecologically sustainable, offer large increases in prosperity to everyone on the planet, and not only function in areas of chaos and corruption, but also help transform them. That alone is a task of historic magnitude, but there is an additional complication: we only get one shot…fail to act boldly enough and we may fail completely.”
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Modelling shows move to 100% renewable energy would save Australia money

Modelling shows move to 100% renewable energy would save Australia money | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Exclusive: estimated cost of moving all electricity, industry and transport onto renewables by 2050 would be $800bn, a saving of $90bn over business as usual
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
We are are at the threshold of rapid and system wide change in the quest for renewable energy. My son Matt, with a wind energy company Apex, showed me the data on why businesses are turning to wind, and this article in Australia makes the case for 100% on the basis of economics, jobs, and ecological health. one of the most noteworthy brights spots of the past year, according to an annual report released Tuesday by the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), was the growing demand for wind energy from major corporations. High-tech firms such as Google Energy, Facebook and Amazon Web Services, as well as more traditional companies such as Procter & Gamble, General Motors, Walmart and Dow Chemical, have signed contracts to purchase increasing amounts of wind energy in coming years. Corporations and other non-utility customers — including some municipalities and universities — accounted for more than half of the wind power capacity sold through so-called power purchase agreements in 2015, according to the AWEA. The group said that corporate and other non-utility buyers have signed contracts for more than 4,500 megawatts of wind power capacity, or enough to power the equivalent of about 1.2 million American homes. All of this is being carried over into large scale analysis with whole countries such as this one on Australia.
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How To Get (And Keep) Others Committed To Change

Leaders can't just dictate a new strategy and say, "Go!" They need to get a lot of people on board, then keep them there.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
True leaders know they can never just dictate change and expect everyone to follow. This article from Fast Company explores the most effective ways to inspire employees to buy into a proposed change and then continue to support and maintain the commitment. This can be accomplished even if they initially reject the idea, through balancing productive incentives with sensible warnings of what potential consequences may be if the change isn’t made. “You can gain buy-in more easily and quickly by communicating in the right way,” the authors advise. “Leaders in these circumstances need to motivate others – to pull them toward their own perspectives at the same time that they warn about the costs of resisting. It’s a timely balancing act that requires getting both right: Motivation is about emphasizing what people will gain by following your leader, while warning is about noting the risks of taking a different route.”
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Biomimicry

Biomimicry | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
The "Beautiful Thinking" Series of Interface Carpets
Via Janine Benyus
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
In 1994, Interface founder, Ray Anderson set out a vision: to unlock true sustainability through ingenious design and innovation. Every process was reviewed. Every material questioned. Today, Interface honours that vision through a passionate belief in the power of design for good - championing the kind of beautiful thinking that can change the world. No matter how big or small, change can only be driven by visionary thinking. Whether that’s creating spaces that improve health and well-being, saving our oceans from destruction, or developing a cleaner industry for our future. The key is to push boundaries and make a genuine commitment to actively pursue new ways of working. For an idea to be truly innovative, it must be ambitious, but it must also have real purpose. Interface is celebrating the beautiful thinkers of today with its latest campaign to raise the profile of ambitious individuals and companies that have driven real innovation in their industries and beyond.
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Meet Tesla's Model 3, Its Long-Awaited Car for the Masses

Meet Tesla's Model 3, Its Long-Awaited Car for the Masses | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
The Model 3—the most important car in  history of Tesla Motors—has arrived.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Wired Magazine: April 1, 2016: THE $35,000 TESLA Model 3 is  here. It is sleek, quick as hell, and meant for the masses. And it is the most important car the company will ever build. And did you watch Elon Musk's the announcement of it last night? The very first thing  he spoke about, substantively with graphs and science, and conviction, was the climate change agenda and the urgent call for the world's transition to sustainable transport. This is the ultimate purpose of the company--as he demonstrated. Imagine if every auto executive started their most important product unveilings that way. Unfortunately, at this level, Elon Musk seems to be the only one to take on the task, not as a secondary "bolted" on agenda but does so with sustainable value creation, as Chris Laszlo calls it, with an "embedded sustainability mindset."   
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Cisco: Partnerships, Megacommunities, and Mindfulness Key to Driving Emissions Reductions Throughout a Supply Chain 

Cisco: Partnerships, Megacommunities, and Mindfulness Key to Driving Emissions Reductions Throughout a Supply Chain  | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it

Cisco installed 1,300 sensors in one of its Malaysian factories to monitor operational energy consumption. The data gathered helped the factory make better decisions about energy efficiency while reducing the carbon footprint associated with the production of Cisco products.

David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
I am fascinated with the Internet of Things where soon there will be sensors everywhere--sensing small changes in ocean temperatures; factory operations; rainfall rates; CO2 emissions; soil quality; sea level rises, etc. It will be like the planet coming awake to all its vital signs. One of the IOT leaders is Cisco, and in this article they speak to their own use of sensors and information across all of its outsourced supply chain impacts. For example Cisco installed 1,300 sensors in one of its Malaysian factories and with information comes action. The sustainable value case, as Cisco works toward the ultimate aim of a circular economy concept, is also getting clearer. The U.S. EPA has recently recognized Cisco for its innovations in greenhouse gas reductions with the 2016 Supply Chain Leadership Award, which spotlights and incentivizes exemplary corporate, organizational, and individual leadership in response to climate change. One wonders about what will happen when we combine all this new technologically-driven consciousness raising with the mindfulness focus of reflective practices where leaders come to more deeply experience the fact that everything is connected. This could be a tremendously potent combination: the mindfulness of reflective practices + a planet more transparently connected with sensors and vital signs pulsating virtually everywhere.  
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The 6 Business Benefits of Becoming a Sustainable Enterprise

The 6 Business Benefits of Becoming a Sustainable Enterprise | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Over the past two decades, sustainability has become more than a fad or just a buzz word. Research shows that sustainability has real business benefits when conscientiously integrated into business operations. Six major advantages for practicing sustainability are:
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
From the time of  Bob Willard's early research project on "The Sustainability Advantage"--http://sustainabilityadvantage.com/--to Chris Laszlo's "Sustainable Value" to Mckinsey's studies on the business benefits, the evidence base for "doing good and doing well" keeps multiplying. In their 2014 report “Profits with Purpose: How Organizing for Sustainability Can Benefit the Bottom Line,” McKinsey researchers looked at 40 companies to understand their sustainability challenges and seek practical recommendations “to capture value from sustainability.” They built on report  by Deutsche Bank which revealed that companies with high ratings in environmental, social, and governance factors outperformed the market in medium and long range terms. McKinsey showed similar results for studies conducted by the Carbon Disclosure Project. Those assertions are supported by calculations related to share price.   Read more: http://www.environmentalleader.com/2016/03/29/6-benefits-of-becoming-a-sustainable-business/#ixzz44JSlEjTU
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Creating a Strategy That Works Must Include High Purpose

Creating a Strategy That Works Must Include High Purpose | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
The most farsighted enterprises have mastered five unconventional practices for building and using distinctive capabilities.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
What this article misses, in my view, are two things. The power of Purpose beyond profit, and the idea of intimacy with the whole, that is a relational way of working toward full spectrum flourishing. Add these to the "unconventional" approaches here, and the extraordinary company stories cited now make more sense. An example is a Brazilian purveyor of high-quality, natural personal-care products. Its identity, captured by the Portuguese slogan bem estar bem (“well-being, being well”) celebrates health and quality of life at every age, rather than a forever-young ideal of beauty. The company has built a network of 1.5 million direct sales consultants, who have close relationships with seemingly every woman in Brazil. To give those consultants a reason to visit their customers every few weeks, the company has developed a proficiency in rapid-fire innovation, releasing more than 100 new products every year. It demonstrates respect for nature and local communities by sourcing many raw materials from remote villages in the Amazon rain forest, and by using its business skills to help make those regions economically and environmentally sustainable. You may not have heard of Natura Cosméticos unless you live in Latin America, but it is the largest personal-care products company in that region. It had revenues of 7.4 billion reals (about US$2.6 billion) in 2014.
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Economics of Happiness: The CEO Judy Wicks Speaks to the Beauty of Local Business and Living Economies

'When we decentralize our economy, beginning with our food and energy systems, we decentraliz...

Economics of Happiness: The CEO Judy Wicks Speaks to the Beauty of Local Business and Living Economies<br/><br/>'When we decentralize our economy, beginning with our food and energy systems, we decentraliz... | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Many activists don’t seem to think it matters where they spend their money.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Judy Wicks is an executive, an entrepreneur, and, the author of "Good Morning, Beautiful Business." She is the founder of Philadelphia's White Dog Cafe, a pioneering business in the farm-to-table movement, and co-founder of the Business Alliance for Local Living Economies. She argues that the vast majority of local business are good businesses and that local intimacy surfaces our intrinsic human impulse to do good, and improve the lot of just not ourselves but our communities. Can large business too operate from this consciousness of connection, or is localization of the economy the primary pathway to great business where doing good and doing well are intrinsic?
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Mini-trends Can Become Macro-Trends: Apple's $1.5bn green bond will inspire more environmental investments

Mini-trends Can Become Macro-Trends: Apple's $1.5bn green bond will inspire more environmental investments | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Apple’s willingness to borrow billions to address the economic impact of climate change could pave the way for other businesses to do the same
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
It's important to notice positive mini-trends because noticing them is an appreciative act--what we appreciate appreciates, or grows in value--and mini-trends can become macro trends. Apple, recently named by Greenpeace as the IT company most on the move in the transition to a sustainable economy, has set in motion a $1.5bn green bond, announced last month, which will fund several initiatives, including the company’s conversion to 100% renewable energy, installation of more energy efficient heating and cooling systems, and an increase in the company’s use of biodegradable materials. A green bond, like a typical bond, is simply a way to borrow money, but it’s issued specifically to fund environmental projects. Will this be a new trend for corporations? Financial services company HSBC predicts between $55bn and $80bn worth of green bonds will be issued around the world in 2016. Learn more in theGuardian. H/t to Kyle Westaway for sharing this story.
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