Using remote sensing in cyclone aftermath
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Tropical_Cyclone_Newsletter_Article_Sep07.pdf

Remote sensing to track cyclones.

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Not aftermath, but monitors cyclones when they are occurring / developing. This uses both grayscale and infrared imagery to determine details about the cyclone. A large part of succesfully dealing with any natural disaster is minimizing damage, so any information that can be given to residents in the cyclone path in order for them to safely approach the situation potentially decreases the amount of cleanup.

 

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NARGIS 93: Proceedings of the North Australian Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems Forum

Riley SJ, Devonport C, Waggitt PW & Fitzpatrick B (eds)
Supervising Scientist 1993
ISBN 0 644 32536 4

The following abstract, executive summary or foreword/preface is reproduced here from the full report. A hard copy of the full report can be ordered from Publications, Supervising Scientist Division. A full list of SSD publications including prices is available on the publications page.
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Fire Management | Central Land Council, Australia

Fire Management | Central Land Council, Australia | Using remote sensing in cyclone aftermath | Scoop.it
The CLC's fire management program is extremely important to the natural resource management of Central Australia. It now uses cutting-edge technology to tackle the vast workload involved in reducing the wildfire risk across Aboriginal lands in the region.
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Bushfire management in the Northern Territory is critical as it can be highly detrimental to both natural wildlife and communities alike. The land needs to be managed in order for bush fires to not spread rapidly and go out of control. This site looks at the interaction and positives to both the remote sensing and indigenous traditional management schemes. 

 

Personally I think it is crucial to keep the traditional methods of fire management going as it is important to culture as well as the natural environment. This can be complimented by remote sensing and improvements in current technology. By identifying dangerous areas and areas that are regularly affected by wild bush fires communities and wildlife can be made safer. 

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2011_poster_andrew_edwards.pdf


Via Jess Harris
David Carroll's insight:

Good information, lots of visuals to support points.

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Jess Harris's curator insight, March 23, 2014 8:00 PM

Some interesting info about fire in north Australia

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Geoscience Australia: AusGeo News 94 - Fighting fire with satellite datasets

Geoscience Australia: AusGeo News 94 - Fighting fire with satellite datasets | Using remote sensing in cyclone aftermath | Scoop.it
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Alerts and Warnings

Alerts and Warnings | Using remote sensing in cyclone aftermath | Scoop.it

This link poppBushfire ALL CLEAR for 40 kilometres south west of Whim Creek in the Shire of Roebourne: Category: Fire
Alert ... http://t.co/CWipjrGz5U

David Carroll's insight:

This link popped up in scooits news feed and caught my eye, this is a good demonstration of how GIS plays a role in all aspects of fire management. By the time I had clicked on the link, the bush fire had been classified as "put out" and it had relevant information regarding how to go about business in and around the areas affected. When the link is opened there is immediately a google maps image of the affected area and relevant info. 

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Jess Harris's comment, March 30, 2014 8:01 PM
This looks like a good website for posting warnings on bush fires. It would be useful if there was a similar website for Australia wide.