Bullying in Schools & Education in South Korea
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Bullying Prevention 101 for Schools: Dos and Don’ts | Berkman Center

Bullying Prevention 101 for Schools: Dos and Don’ts | Berkman Center | Bullying in Schools & Education in South Korea | Scoop.it
Bullying Prevention 101 for Schools: Dos and Don’ts http://t.co/zfis4yYE

Via Jem Muldoon
Katie Chung's insight:

Like many other sensitive topics, bullying should be approached carefully and cautiously. This PDF is a great resource that give teachers the rundown of how to approach bullying and how to teach it in their classrooms. As teachers it is our duty not only to teach about topics like bullying, but approach it in a way that will not put students on the spot or calls out specific students. We must remember that bullying happens to be a very personal issue and should be doing all we can do to teach it in an effective, yet sensitive way.

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Jem Muldoon's curator insight, January 20, 2013 12:08 PM

This document provides a list of dos and don’ts for schools in developing anti-bullying practices and policies. The purpose of this document is to provide concrete ways in which schools 1) can assess if they’re doing the right things; 2) have tactical recommendations aimed at improving their school culture, curricula, and school policies. Findings are grounded in research findings on actions and activities that have been shown to help schools improve anti-bullying efforts.

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Where To Find The Best Education Around The World

Where To Find The Best Education Around The World | Bullying in Schools & Education in South Korea | Scoop.it
The United States places 17th in the developed world for education, according to a global report by education firm Pearson. Finland and South Korea, not surprisingly, top the list of 40 developed countries with the best education systems.
Katie Chung's insight:

South Korea is said to have one of the best education systems in the world. This is no surprise considering the fact that school is such a huge priority in South Korea. From a young age, children are constantly reminded by thier parents that they need to do well in school and are taught to priortize their education. In addition, South Korean students are said to have some of the most well-qualified teachers. Personally, I think it is wonderful that many countries are trying to emulate an education system like the one that exists in South Korea. Being a Korean American myself, I take much pride in the fact that my home country has one of the best education systems in the world. Although I admire the education system in South Korea, I think that sometimes students are pushed way beyond their limit and are not able to enjoy a fulfilling and fun childhood. 

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Culture of studying in South Korea

In the most recent survey conducted by the BBC and Harris Poll, more than 60 percent of respondents said the US is worse than other countries when it comes t...
Katie Chung's insight:

In this video, it follows a 10-year-old South Korean student and describes his daily routine of going to school. This video also touches upon the competitive nature of South Koreans. Being a Korean American myself, this is extremely apparent even among Koreans here in America. In my own life, my Korean friends are always comparing how well they do on their SAT's or how many A's they received on their last report card. Koreans are extremely success driven, where one is defined by how well they do in school or what they are able to bring to the table. As a result, South Koreans feel the need to constantly beat others through their test scores and in many cases parents will push their children to do well so that they can preserve their image and make themselves look better. With such a competitive spirit in our blood, Koreans desire to be at the top and are extremely motivated to constantly work hard. I believe that is huge driving force that helps explain why the South Korean education system is so successful. Even though it motivates students to work hard, I don't really agree with this notion that people are judged solely on how well they do. This ultimately can encourage students to feel discouraged and may make them  feel like they're not good enough simply because they aren't at the top of their class. South Korean students are without a doubt motivated, but this motivation can definitely backfire and hurt htem more than help them.

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South-Korea-PISA.jpg (430x305 pixels)

South-Korea-PISA.jpg (430x305 pixels) | Bullying in Schools & Education in South Korea | Scoop.it
Katie Chung's insight:

This is a chart looking at the average tests scores comparing the US and South Korea. South Korea dominates in all three subjects. This chart is extremely indicative of how successful the South Korean education system is compared to other countries and highlights how South Korean goes above and beyond in its education system. I believe that if we adopt some of the practices that the South Korean education system utilize, we could significantly increase our average. If the United States values education as much as South Korea does and gains greater motivation to improve its education system, we can definitely bring our education system to a higher standing.

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Bullying Prevention 101 for Schools: Dos and Don’ts | Berkman Center

Bullying Prevention 101 for Schools: Dos and Don’ts | Berkman Center | Bullying in Schools & Education in South Korea | Scoop.it
Bullying Prevention 101 for Schools: Dos and Don’ts http://t.co/zfis4yYE

Via Jem Muldoon
Katie Chung's insight:

Like many other sensitive topics, bullying should be approached carefully and cautiously. This PDF is a great resource that give teachers the rundown of how to approach bullying and how to teach it in their classrooms. As teachers it is our duty not only to teach about topics like bullying, but approach it in a way that will not put students on the spot or calls out specific students. We must remember that bullying happens to be a very personal issue and should be doing all we can do to teach it in an effective, yet sensitive way.

more...
Jem Muldoon's curator insight, January 20, 2013 12:08 PM

This document provides a list of dos and don’ts for schools in developing anti-bullying practices and policies. The purpose of this document is to provide concrete ways in which schools 1) can assess if they’re doing the right things; 2) have tactical recommendations aimed at improving their school culture, curricula, and school policies. Findings are grounded in research findings on actions and activities that have been shown to help schools improve anti-bullying efforts.

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STC11_Bullying_Program.pdf

Katie Chung's insight:

his is an example of resources that can be used to teach about bullying in the classroom. I think it is absolutely crucial to teach students how to deal with bullying and remind them the importance of telling an adult when something is wrong. Teaching our students practical ways to deal with bullying may dramitically diminish the severity of this issue. Personally, I believe that children have the ability to become great advocates for social change and have great power to change the world. By utilizing curriculum like this, I believe students will be empowered to bring bully to an end will give them the insight they need to do so.

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Cyberbully suicide attempt scene Sia - breathe me

This is the suicide attempt scene from Cyberbully.
Katie Chung's insight:

This is a video clip from the movie Cyberbully, which goes over the topic about Bullying. It shows how the protagonist is pushed beyond her limit and attempts to commit suicide. A lot of students who commit suicide often do it because they are being bullied. If no action is taken to stop bullying, students will continue to tragically try to take their own lives.

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South Korea's schools: Long days, high results

South Korea's schools: Long days, high results | Bullying in Schools & Education in South Korea | Scoop.it
The success in international tests has a cost in long hours of study for South Korean teenagers.
Katie Chung's insight:

In South Korea, school is not like how it is here, where students go home after spending 7 hours at school. Right after school, students are sent to hagwons (tutoring centers) and spend countless hours studying. As a result, South Korean students do extremely well in schools because they spend so much time outside of the classroom studying and learning. Throughout middle school and high school, my parents sent me to hagwon for two hours two times a week to help me brush up my skills on reading and math. The summer of my junior year, they sent me to a private SAT hagwon, where I spent two hours taking practice tests. To be honest, I never enjoyed going to hagwon and it was extremely tiredsome going after a long day at school. Even though I did not enjoy it, it definitely helped me not only do better in school, but it better prepared me for the SAT's. In the same way, these hagwons are benefical for South Korean students and allows them to perform better in school. I do believe that they spend too much time at the hagwons and feel that they should be able to get a break every now and then. I think these students should be given a little more freedom and have the ability to spend time with their family. Although I see the value in making them go to hagwons, but I think they should be mindful that these students have lives outside of school and should give them some free time. 

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South Korea - The Suicide Capital of the World | Beyond HallyuBeyond Hallyu

South Korea - The Suicide Capital of the World | Beyond HallyuBeyond Hallyu | Bullying in Schools & Education in South Korea | Scoop.it
Katie Chung's insight:

Not only does South Korea have one of the best education systems in the world, but they unfortunately happen to be one of the countries with the highest suicide rates. According to this article, 40-43 people commit suicide EVERY DAY and shows that suicide rates are constantly increasing. It is extremely sad that suicide is so prevalent in South Korea. Personally, I feel that the current education system contributes to this. Although the South Korean education system is highly accredited and valued, I think it puts way too much pressure on students. South Korean students are bombarded with homework, tests, and standardized tests and are surrounded by teachers and parents that are extremely strict and hold high expectations. As a result, some of these students are worked to the bone and are so burnt out that death becomes their only escape from it all. It is extremely unfortunate that so many students are ending their lives because the pressure is too much for them to handle. I think doing well in school is indeed important, but I think the well-being of a student should be put first. I think these students shouldn't be put under so much pressure and should be able to enjoy the activities that help them escape and relax. As much as I see the value in encouraging students to do well in school, pushing them beyond thier breaking point is no way to approach it.

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New Study Calls for Cyberbullying Education in Elementary Schools

New Study Calls for Cyberbullying Education in Elementary Schools | Bullying in Schools & Education in South Korea | Scoop.it
A report out of Massachusetts shows cyberbullying on the rise in elementary schools and calls for better and earlier education for prevention.

Via EDTECH@UTRGV
Katie Chung's insight:

In today's society, our students are immersed in a culture filled with technology and have become so dependent on it. With the growing use of technology by children, cyberbullying has been a growing issue especially in the past several years. Bullying is not merely physical: children are being verbally attacked through harsh comments made about them online. Bullying doesn't end at school and follows many students home. Cyberbullying is growing because bullies are able to hide their identity and say whatever they want. Since cyberbullying has been growing in the past several years, I believe that students should learn about cyberbullying in schools and what they can do to prevent it. Technology is an excellent tool that plays an essential part of our lives each and every day, but we must remind ourselves that there are people out their who manipulate it to worsen the lives of others. By teaching students to be more cautious about how they use technology and tech them practical ways to deal with cyberbullies, I believe that we can be one step closer to bringing bullying to an end.

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Jaclyn Wagoner's curator insight, April 16, 2014 1:00 AM

Cyberbullying is a serious thing that needs to be dwelt with in a serious manner. It should not be looked at as once you leave the school its not the schools problem because it could affect how the student works in class and how they interact with their peers.

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Bullying Statistics - Youth "Ambassadors 4 Kids" Club (A4K)

Bullying Statistics - Youth "Ambassadors 4 Kids" Club (A4K) | Bullying in Schools & Education in South Korea | Scoop.it
Katie Chung's insight:

Looking at the statistics of bullying is absolutely heartbreaking. According to this website, 1 in 4 kids are bullied and and whopping 77% of students are bullied mentally, physically, and verbally. It also mentions how 4 out of 10 students will drop out of school because they are being bullied. To say that bullying in schools is an issue is a complete understatement and something needs to be done about it. As teachers, it is our duty to provide each student with the best learning experience possible and should do all we can to make sure that students are being treated fairly. Bullying continues to effect students each and every day and something needs to be done about it. Teaching our students about bullying and showing them practical ways to address bullying can definitely decrease these shocking numbers.

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Muncie schools pass required anti-bullying plan - WRTV Indianapolis

Muncie schools pass required anti-bullying plan - WRTV Indianapolis | Bullying in Schools & Education in South Korea | Scoop.it
Muncie schools pass required anti-bullying plan WRTV Indianapolis The anti-bullying plan approved by the school board last week applies to teachers, bus drivers, cafeteria workers and even volunteers, The Star Press reported Monday...
Katie Chung's insight:

This article specfically looks at a school wide anti-bully plan that requires students and teachers alike to report incidences of bullying. Bullying is an issue that needs to be dealt with not only in classrooms, but throughout entire schools as well. Students need to understand that people from all different ages, grades, genders, and races are bullied and implementing a school wide plan like this can show them exactly that. In addition, implementing a school wide plan not only strives to eliminate bullying in each classroom, but it strives to do so throughout the whole school. Having a plan like this will definitely remind the students the importance of taking action against bullying and will teach them practical ways of dealing with bullying.

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