Bullying in Schools
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"It's What You Do" | Stop Bullying: Speak Up | Cartoon Network - YouTube

SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/109Y6wq National Bullying Prevention Month is almost here! Check out a special message from the cast of Incredible Crew, and don't m...
Amanda Kronenberger's insight:

This is a YouTube video from a commercial from cartoon network about speaking up against bullies. There are two teenagers, a boy and a girl, rapping about how when you see someone getting bullied or you yourself are being bullied you should tell an adult. They main line is, “it’s what ya do it’s what ya do,” referring to speaking up when you see some act of bullying. “When you see something wrong like someone getting rough, you need to be strong yeah mentally tough.” A girl is seen tracking down a teacher to tell him what happened. This is followed with, “you need to find and adult tell the teacher what’s up. When you need to stop a bully, ya need to speak up.” I think this commercial is great for encouraging young students to do something about bulling. The people in the video are very enthusiastic about it, and one kid tells a girl what she did was “really cool.” This is sure to be seen by kids because it is on a channel that they watch often. If they see it here where the “cool” shows they are watching play, they are more likely to take it to heart. More commercials like this should be shown on TV channels to that the message is drilled into kid’s minds. While I know things like these will not stop bullying all together, it is a step in the right direction.

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Top 5 Ways Educators Can Stop Bullies | ED.gov Blog

Amanda Kronenberger's insight:

This article is pretty straightforward but very important. It is based on the documentary, Bully, which follows several students around schools showing the bullying that happens on an everyday basis. In addition, it shows how educators struggle to stop this from happening. The article introduces 5 tips that can help teachers, administrators and other school personnel prevent bullying from occurring in school, as well as how to respond when it happens.

 

1. Create a Safe and Supportive Environment

Establish a culture of inclusion and respect that welcomes all students Monitor bullying “hot spots” in and around the building. Set a tone of respect in the classroom.

2. Manage Classrooms to Prevent Bullying

Develop rules with students so they set their own climate of respect and responsibility, and reinforce the rules by making expectations clear and keeping requests simple, direct and specific.

3. Stop Bullying on the Spot

Intervene immediately. It’s OK to get another adult to help. Don’t talk to the kids involved together, only separately, and don’t make the kids involved apologize or patch up relations on the spot.

4. Find Out What Happened

Get the facts, keep all the children involved separate, listen without blaming and don’t call the act “bullying” while you are trying to understand what happened.

5. Support the Kids Involved

All kids involved in bullying—whether they are bullied, bully others, or see bullying—can be affected. It is important to support all kids involved to make sure the bullying doesn’t continue and effects can be minimized.

 

    I feel that all of these tips are very helpful and that I would use these when I become a teacher and see bullying. For example, allows both sides of the story to be heard and do not talk to the kids about the incident together. You should not pass judgment before hearing the whole story. I feel that you should not pass judgment at all because most likely there is a reason behind why the bully-er is doing what he is doing. This is important in Tip 5, which states, “It is important to support all kids involved to make sure the bullying doesn’t continue and effects can be minimized.” While the student being bullied is obviously going to be hurt and should receive attention because of this, the child on the other side should also receive as much, if not more, to get to the root of the problem. He/she may be experiencing issues at home or another serious problem that you may be able to assist with. This is over looked often times and the child will just receive a punishment. While they should receive this punishment, they must also receive help. 

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Girl Gets Hair Ripped Off To The Scalp During Bullying Incident - CBS Atlanta

Girl Gets Hair Ripped Off To The Scalp During Bullying Incident - CBS Atlanta | Bullying in Schools | Scoop.it
Aolani Dunbar is an 8-year-old in third grade. Her grandmother Dorris Bearden told WSB-TV that her granddaughter wanted long so she could brush it like other girls.
Amanda Kronenberger's insight:

   This article explains an incident that happened in school in Atlanta, Georgia.  I think that it is important to include while investigating bullying in schools because I was shocked and it highlights just how serious bullying is. Before reading this, I was under the impression that bullying most of the time did not go past name-calling and teasing with younger children. While I think that this alone is traumatic, horrible and enough to have this issue is as large as it is, I never expected such young students to be violent. I thought this was only something you saw in the movies.

    What happened was an 8-year-old girl had her scalp ripped by bullies who made fun of her extensions. The girl, Aolani Dunbar, was picked on for two weeks about her extensions in schools before this happened. Aolani described it as this:

“They kept pulling it and pulling it, especially on the playground,” the little girl told WSB. “Everybody got a chance and I was in the gazebo sitting there crying because I have no friends to play with that will protect me.”

I think this absolutely heartbreaking. No child should ever have to experience something so horrifying. She was taken to the emergency room after this incident and now has a wound on the crown of her head. The doctors had to shave it to avoid it getting affected. They say that she may never be able to grow hair in the section of her head again because of this, and she may need skin grafts.

      Aolani’s grandmother said, “When I saw just the horror of it, I just started to cry. I cried as I unbraided her hair and the hair fell out in my hands.” Reportedly, Aolani now suffers from post traumatic stress disorder because of the issue. She is afraid to go to school because she thinks her peers are going to start ripping her hair out. What was the punishment for the bullies? One of them go an in school suspension. I think this is absolutely not enough. These bullies changed this young girls life. They physically attacked her. This is all they get? There should be a lot more done about this case.

            This school should think about implementing something like what Ryler Turner and Hailey Crow, two sixth graders, created at Bristow Elementary School. If they has a system like this, Aloani or someone else could have reported what was happening to her and who were the culprits. It may have not have gone as far as it did if there was somewhere to report this anonymously. 

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Bristow's students help create 'report a bully' web form

Bristow's students help create 'report a bully' web form | Bullying in Schools | Scoop.it
Rylee Turner, a sixth-grader at Bristow Elementary School, says some people are afraid to speak out about bullying.
Amanda Kronenberger's insight:

   This article is about a girl who decided to take matters into her own hands when it comes to bullying. Ryler Turner and Hailey Crow, two sixth graders at Bristow Elementary School, is a "first responder" to bullying. She along with other students takes action against bullies. They decide whether to take action into their own hands or alert an adult of the situation, so that they can intervene. Turner and Crow created a web sight, accessible to students and parents, where you can report a bully by filling out a special form. “Now kids can tell people when they are being bullied instead of holding it in,” Hailey said. I wonder if the form is anonymous. That would be interesting because it would probably make more students willing to fill out forms. However, it could also be a problem because students could see it as a joke and file a false claim if their names are not attached to it.

    Turner and Crow are part of Student Technology Leadership Program at Bristow. They worked with Leah Renfrow, a fifth-grade teacher, and Amy Buss, media specialist, to create the bullying forms from the Google Drive computer program. Rylee said it took about half an hour to design the form. “It asks for information on names, time, date and place of the bullying and asks for a description of the incident.” This is definitely information that should be spread to schools everywhere; especially it is so fast and easy to do. It could really have an impact on schools where bullying is a problem. According to the article, Bristow never really had an issue with bullying, so we cannot really see statistics to whether or not the program works. Kim Wolfram said “bullying isn’t an issue at the school and the creation of the form is a pro-active approach to keep things that way.”

    According the article, Bristow’s number one priority is student’s safety. They even have teachers in the bathrooms during breaks. Personally, I think this is an invasion on privacy. Students should be able to have some time for themselves without being watched. I know for me, the bathroom in schools was somewhere I could go to regroup if I was having a bad day. Having teachers in there would have totally changed that. I think that with the online forms, if something were to happen in the bathroom, it would get back to someone so that it could be handled.

    I think it is really great the students and faculty were able to work together to create this program. Because their peers, not just their superiors, formed it it could make students more willing to actually make use of the program. 

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Why Do Kids Bully? | Education.com

"Why do kids bully?" A simple question with complex answers. This article lists many of the risk factors that help answer the question, "Why do kids bully?"
Amanda Kronenberger's insight:

    Why do kids bully? In order to try and stop bullying in schools, we must find out the reasons for why bullies do what they do in the first place. There are many reasons why kids bully and I think they can all be addressed in schools to help the child so that he/she does not take out their problems on the other children in school. The first thing that is a cause of bulling is the family life at home of the child. For example, a lack of warmth from family members, a lack of supervision or overly-permissive parents, harsh physical discipline, bullying from parents of older siblings, according to this article. Issues like this can be difficult for teachers to deal with. First, the child has to open up about these problems at home so that you can take action. Meeting with the parents may or may not be helpful, because they could believe there is nothing wrong with their behavior. The guidance counselor would be a good resource for the child in this situation.

       In addition, children could bully because their peers are doing it. If a child has friends who bully or have a positive attitude about violence their peers could influence them. The article says, “When children are aggregated together, they associate with others who are similar to them or who have qualities or characteristics that in some way support their own behaviors.” In this case, you have to address the problem by potentially separating these students. I feel that if a bully has an accomplice that makes the problem twice as bad. They could feel that it is justified because someone else is doing the same thing. In addition, students who may have a high status my bully to keep that status and increase the power they have.  Additionally, students who with low social status may use bullying to deflect taunting and aggression that is aimed at them.

    In the article, this is what most aggravated me. “Bullying thrives in schools where faculty and staff do not address bullying, where there is no policy against bullying, and where there is little supervision of students—especially during lunch, bathroom breaks, and recess.” This shows that bullying CAN be prevented if addressed. It is not unpreventable because obviously schools that have a huge issue with it are not doing enough.  This is proven true in Bristow Elementary School, where the principal says that bullying is not an issue there. This is because they have taken many initiatives to prevent it, for example, the website where it can be anonymously reported. This article proves that most reasons for bullying can be addressed by schools so that it can be prevented. 

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I Like the Way You Are by Eve Bunting

I Like the Way You Are by Eve Bunting | Bullying in Schools | Scoop.it
Amanda Kronenberger's insight:

    This story is about two turtles that are best friends, despite their differences. Spottie and Turtle are both good at doing certain things, but also bad at doing others, like most people. They always except this and encourage each other regardless, which is why they have a great friendship. Their attitude is displayed through this quote- ““Isn’t it nice?” Turtle said. “One turtle is good at one thing. Another turtle is good at something else.” His friend agreed, “Together we are good at twice as many things.”” Also, when Spottie and Turtle do thing together they are always willing to compromise. For example, when they go to the movies and one wants to sit in the front, but the other wants to sit in the back of the theatre, they sit in the middle so that the are both happy. This is a great book for young students to be exposed to because it teaches a valuable lesson of friendship. If their friend is bad at something, they may immediately start making fun of them, which can hurt their feelings. However, they must realize that everyone has strengths and weaknesses, and true friends are accepting of these. This book can be tied really be tied to bullying because it shows children how to treat others, as opposed to bullying, which is not how they should treat others. In schools, students either experience being bullied, see bullying or are the ones actually doing the bullying. This book can teach all students a lesson. If I taught a younger grade level, in my classroom, I would read this book in the beginning of the school year. I would explain to students that we treat each other with kindness and respect like Spottie and Turtle do. We are all good at some things, but also struggle with things.  We never tease each other because of it. If I see a student bullying another, I would ask, is that how Spottie and Turtle would treat each other. I would contently remind students of this lesson throughout the school year so that they really learn the lesson on this book.

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Ohio mom accuses other parents of bullying her transgender daughter | The Raw Story

Ohio mom accuses other parents of bullying her transgender daughter | The Raw Story | Bullying in Schools | Scoop.it
Amanda Kronenberger's insight:

“A central Ohio woman says other parents are using social media to harass her and her transgender child.”

 

    Keating, 9 years old now, was born a boy but now identifies as a female, named Keat. The video of the young girl shows her in her very pink room, showing the cameras her crown and other sorts of items. Her mother, Emily LeVan, said the family was very excited that they were able to get her named legally changed to Keat, just a week before this article/ video was published online. To celebrate and share the news, she shared the information in a Facebook status. However, some parents in the community were less than pleased to hear of this. Not only were they adults, but parents of Keat’s classmates. One responded, “I am terribly ticked that the parents are allowed to send their boy to school as a girl and put him in this embarrassing situation, “and another called her actions child abuse.” Hearing of this absolutely disgusts me. These parents are supposed to be raining accepting children to go out into the world and making is a better place. If they are writing this online, what are they saying to their children in the privacy of their own homes? With parents like this, it is not surprising that kids in school teased Keat as she was going through her transitions. However, Keat would respond, “I said, I was a girl, and it’s none of your business,’” (good for Keat!!)

            It is refreshing to hear that Keat’s school is 100% behind her decision and did not give her any trouble at all. “School officials said they addressed the harassment immediately and have a zero tolerance policy for that type of behavior.” It is not always easy to be accepting of such things. When seeing this video, I immediately thought of Jazzy, the girl who we learned about in class. Both of these girls are SO strong for being able to make these decisions that define their lives, and are lucky to have supportive families. I wish that these two girls could get together and talk about the struggles they are facing, because they would understand eachother so well. Taking to Facebook might not have been the best thing of LaVine to do, knowing there are cruel people out there. However, its time people learn that everyone is different. Bullying by peers is one thing, but by parents? This should never be a problem. This is a very interesting look at bullying that I was not expecting to see at all.  

 

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