Bye Bye Bullies
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Rescooped by Grace Hamilton from SocialAction2014
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A Must-See Anti-Bullying Poster Perfect For Classrooms

A Must-See Anti-Bullying Poster Perfect For Classrooms | Bye Bye Bullies | Scoop.it
This anti-bullying poster is absolutely perfect for posting on your classroom website or on your bulletin board. We at Edudemic love it.

Via Gust MEES, Darcy Delaproser
Grace Hamilton's insight:

This is the best anti-bullying poster I think I've ever come across. The visual would be perfect in an elementary classroom, and the poster covers all areas from glasses to adoption to stuttering. Let's celebrate our differences!

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Gust MEES's curator insight, April 28, 2013 11:22 AM

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Cyberbullying

 

COFACE's curator insight, May 14, 2013 10:17 AM

Very cute!

 

L Orange's curator insight, May 16, 2013 4:50 PM

Supports an iPad book called "It's Okay to be Different" (via Story Panda). Beautiful but simple message. 

Rescooped by Grace Hamilton from Bullying Intervention
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Bullying in Schools - Tips to Stop Bullying at WomansDay.com

Bullying in Schools - Tips to Stop Bullying at WomansDay.com | Bye Bye Bullies | Scoop.it

This excerpt had my brain working overtime as I couldn't decide whether or not to agree with the part about "snooping." It's tricky since students are often cyberbullied, so adults can't always see the direct effects. But, snooping violates your child's privacy and they may no longer trust you. I don't know who to side with!Find out how to protect your kids from bullying in schools, including tips to stop bullying, at WomansDay.com.


Via Ulla M. Saikku, Debbie Lynch
Grace Hamilton's insight:

This excerpt had my brain working overtime as I couldn't decide whether or not to agree with the part about "snooping." It's tricky since students are often cyberbullied, so adults can't always see the direct effects. But, snooping violates your child's privacy and they may no longer trust you. I don't know who to side with!

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Stacy Siegel's curator insight, March 15, 2014 7:13 PM

There are important ways to help with bullying not only at school, but at home too. Parents need to be aware of ways in which they can help their children overcome and prevent bullying.

Debbie Lynch's curator insight, March 27, 2014 3:50 PM

Bullying is headline news. It is an epidemic that has created cause for national concern. It is such a large problem, with such far reaching effects that it has been recognized as a contributing factor to issues of mental health, and even suicide. Because technology is so readily available cyber bullying has created situations were the bullying goes viral. In a matter of minutes literally hundreds of people can be part of the bully mentality, leaving the victim feeling crushed and worthless. Often parents are unaware that there child is being bullied. Certain signs are usually associated with the victim, mood swings, depression, and feigning illness so to not go to school. Without communication these signs are often overlooked as normal childhood symptoms. The strongest weapon a parent can have is establishing a strong relationship with effective communication. When a child can open up and talk about the problem adults can intervene and offer coping strategies. It is not snooping to check up on your child's facebook or twitter accounts. Parents have the responsibility to safeguard their child from bullies. Once a problem has been identified and assessed arrange to meet with your child's teacher. Teachers are often unaware as bullies are sneaky. The school will deal with the issue based on state law and district policy. If your child is being harassed on the internet report it to your ISP. Physical forms of bullying should be reported to the police. Kids are resilient. We can help them recover from the emotional effects of bullying by supporting them, listening to them, and teaching them how to cope and be assertive.

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Student Bullying in the U.S. - Facts (Infographic)

Student Bullying in the U.S. - Facts (Infographic) | Bye Bye Bullies | Scoop.it

An infographic that looks at effects of bullying and effects on bullies as well as providing statistical information, a definition and more.


Via Beth Dichter
Grace Hamilton's insight:

This colorful infographic displays useful information about student bullying, while providing astonishing current U.S. stats. This chart taught me more about bullying in classrooms in a few minutes than I've learned in the past few months! The fact that every seven minutes a child is bullied is a statistic I can't and won't ignore.

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Soren Andrews's curator insight, May 12, 2014 8:51 AM

I think this a a great for percents and it has much of the information that you need in order to make a great persuasive essay. It tells you what bullying does and which ways they can bully you. It says who are the ones being bullied and how many people in the world do something about it.

Nithilan Mambakkam's curator insight, October 9, 2014 8:20 PM

 This tell info about bullying.

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KCK Police Take Anti-Bullying Lesson To School - KMBC Kansas City

KCK Police Take Anti-Bullying Lesson To School - KMBC Kansas City | Bye Bye Bullies | Scoop.it
KCK Police Take Anti-Bullying Lesson To SchoolKMBC Kansas CityKansas City, Kan., police launched an effort to try to curb youth bullying by talking to children at the elementary school level.

Via Lasting Rose
Grace Hamilton's insight:

This caught my eye because I've never heard of police officers spreading the anti-bullying message. With their presence, elementary schoolers might almost think that to bully would be against the law. This could be an excellent approach!

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BrainPOP | Cyberbullying

In this educational animated movie about Technology learn about bullying, computers messaging, chatting, and the Internet.

Via Sandra McLeod Humphrey
Grace Hamilton's insight:
One of the seventh graders I tutor has to watch brainpop videos for his science homework each week. The Tim and Moby videos are intriguing and informative, so when I saw this, I had to watch it! Who knew these two could transition from explaining how a bruise changes colors, to the impacts of cyberbullying!
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Things Every Teacher Should Know About Bullying

Things Every Teacher Should Know About Bullying | Bye Bye Bullies | Scoop.it

Is bullying an issue in your school? Did you know that 1 out of 4 kid are bullied everyone month in the U.S., that 1 in 10 drops out of school due to repetitive bullying? This infographic provides an eye opening look and "share facts about the methods, consequences and prentative measures related to bullies and bullied victimes in schools."


Via Beth Dichter, BI Media Specialists
Grace Hamilton's insight:

I wanted to scoop this bullying infographic as well because it provides bullying prevention techniques that I think are really valuable. It also provides the statistic that 35.5% of students believe schools can help prevent bullying, so I hope with these prevention techniques will encourage schools to increase intervention and supervision.

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BI Media Specialists's curator insight, January 31, 2014 10:14 AM
I just read a book about bullying that was heart-wrenching! The statistics are scary! Bullying is getting easier and more anonymous with the use of technology. We all need to be aware of it's impact in our school!
Soren Andrews's curator insight, May 12, 2014 9:05 AM

This is a very good article because apart from having a lot of information, it has lots of pictures and statistics.  Also, it uses many simple to understand  pictures and charts.  If you need numbers in bullying, this article is just what you need. 

Erin Ryan's curator insight, October 24, 2015 5:53 PM

We use Olweus Bullying Prevention program in our region. It is a school and district wide effort to end bullying, promote healthy peer relationships, and to help students deal with bullying. The program teaches students through frequent class meetings. Videos and discussions are used to help students problem solve through those tough situations they encounter at school. Elementary students make pledges to their school communities in regards to not watching or letting bullying happen, treating others nicely, not talking badly about others, etc. The conversations are a bit more in depth at the middle and high school levels. The goal is to provide children of all ages with  tools and strategies to help them deal with bullying, whether they are being bullied or are witnessing it. In our schools, we have yet to survey students since implementation so the impact of the program is yet to be foreseen. What is clear, is that schools must do something to proactively prevent bullying. Consequences for bullying should be clearly stated in handbooks with parents and students understanding the seriousness.