Bullying And Aggression
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Bullying and Suicide - Bullying Statistics

There is a strong link between bullying and suicide, as suggested by recent bullying-related suicides in the US and other countries. Parents, teachers, and students learn the dangers of bullying and help students who may be at risk of committing suicide.
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Suicide is the third leading cause of death among young people, resulting in about 4,400 deaths per year, according to the CDC. Parents should encourage their teens to talk about bullying that takes place. It may be embarrassing for kids to admit they are the victims of bullying, and most kids don't want to admit they have been involved in bullying. In several cases where bullying victims killed themselves, bullies had told the teen that he or she should kill him or herself or that the world would be better without them.

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Female Bullying - Bullying Statistics

There are many different types of bullying including female bullying. The classic type of bullying includes the mean boy on the playground, but now it is clear female bullying is just as prominent and severe as bullying with males. Female bullying can sometimes even be worse.
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In fact, girls can be just as ruthless especially when it comes to the type of bullying that is not as physical. In recent news headlines, there have been cases of female bullying where teen girls will physically gang up on one another and attack. Verbal bullying is also a very common type of bullying that almost everyone is guilty of at some point in time or another. Talking to your children is the best way to find out if they are having issues with bullying at school, after school or online. Children and teens with higher self-esteem and more friends are less likely to become the victims of bullying.

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How Girls Bully

How Girls Bully | Bullying And  Aggression | Scoop.it
How Girls Bully, About.com Teen Advice
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Having friends who work to make others feel that they are not good enough to be included is another. The victim feels like everybody is against them, not just the bully. Girls who bully will pick on boys as well as other girls. Girls socialize differently than boys. Teachers and parents tend to talk about the obvious when they talk about bullying.

 

Girls get other kids to gang up on one or more peers as a way of exerting control. Girls bully by using emotional violence. Being beaten up emotionally on a daily basis does damage to the victims.

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POWER PLAY: GIRLS, BULLYING AND HIDDEN AGGRESSION

POWER PLAY: GIRLS, BULLYING AND HIDDEN AGGRESSION | Bullying And  Aggression | Scoop.it
  By Selina Lucy. A roll of the eyes, a turned shoulder, hard glares and behind-the-hands, furtive whispers indicate the tip of an iceberg that is the secret world of female aggression. Bullyi...
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The impact of female bullying can be traumatic to its victims. O’Neil states that girls, who are getting bullied, can experience shattered self-esteem. It hurts the essential personal goal and desire for young women who need to make a ground of positive relationships in which trust and communication is vital. It can crush their self-image and sense of identity, leaving them feeling lonely, anxious and depressed. These young women often experience weakness, confusion and suppress feelings of shame and guilt. They may feel responsible for what is happening to them, causing mental self-doubt and impacting further on their psychological distress.

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Bullying and Depression - Bullying Statistics

Bullying and depression are often related. Depression affects both bullies and their victims. Victims of cyber bullying may be at even higher risk for depression. Learn about bullying and depression and how you can help stop bullying.
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Researchers have discovered a strong link between bullying and depression. people who are bullied as children are more likely to suffer from depression as an adult than children not involved in bullying.

The Cyberbullying Research Center found that victims of cyber bullying were more likely to suffer from low self esteem and suicidal thoughts. 

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Girl’s suicide a caution to talk about online bullying, Gibbons family says (with video)

Girl’s suicide a caution to talk about online bullying, Gibbons family says (with video) | Bullying And  Aggression | Scoop.it
Montana Delorey was tall and pretty, a star at her local dance studio, the only daughter in a family full of sons. The vibrant 12-year-old had a mischievous streak, too. With a cat or some other critter in her arms, she’d sidle up to Lacey Urbanski, basking in her aunt’s growing discomfort. “I don’t have nothing,” she’d protest.
Jatacia McCalister's insight:

Gibbons School is involved in WITS, an anti-bullying program which encourages students to walk away, ignore, talk and seek support. In a digital playground, there is no place where the taunting, teasing and exclusion can’t hurt you. After her death, family found that troubling online posts had been deleted, Urbanski said. Since Montana’s death, family and friends has been selling anti-bullying T-shirts and bracelets. After Montana’s death, her classmates talked about what to do to remember her.

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Teaching Teens That Bullies Can Change Reduces Aggression in School, Study Shows | News

Teaching Teens That Bullies Can Change Reduces Aggression in School, Study Shows | News | Bullying And  Aggression | Scoop.it
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Teens reported their beliefs about change — for instance, whether bullies and victims are types of people who can’t change — and then responded to situations of conflict or exclusion. Across the board, respondents who believed people can’t change were more likely to think the offense was done on purpose, and as a result desired aggressive revenge to “hurt them” or “punish them.”

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