Find tag "Mitterrand"
12.7K views | +0 today
The Post 2012 Village
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Jacques Le Bris

The Myth and Magic of Pic de Bugarach

The Myth and Magic of Pic de Bugarach | Bugarach | Scoop.it

This past weekend, Yvette Monahan published a book of photographs about a rural area in south-central France between the Mediterranean Sea and the Pyrenees mountains. At the region’s center is a mountain called Bugarach. Monahan spent a year taking pictures of the mountain and its surroundings, which have a rich mythical history. I was enchanted by the photos in her book, ‘‘The Time of Dreaming the World Awake,’’ when I saw them recently, so I reached out to her and got her to tell me what sparked her interest in this French spot:

I was visiting a friend in the area in 2010 when I first heard the story about the mountain Bugarach. A few months later, back in Ireland, I found myself retelling the stories repeatedly. Bugarach and the surrounding area are shrouded in mystery and myth, and seem to have drawn people toward it for centuries.

The mountain itself is a geological anomaly, since its top layers are millions of years older than its bottom ones, making it an ‘‘upside down mountain.’’ I’ve heard that due to this strange geology, its magnetism is inverted.

The mystery of Rennes-le-Château, a village on one side of the mountain, is quite a tourist attraction and receives thousands of visitors every year. The Treasure of the Templars, the Holy Grail some call it, is said to be housed in one of the Cathar castles that dominate the landscape, usually perched on spectacular rocky outcrops. Regarded as heretics by the Catholic Church, the Cathars were wiped out by the Albigensian Crusade led by Pope Innocent III. When a general asked how to distinguish between Cathar and Catholic, the response was ‘‘kill them all, God will know.’’

Nostradamus and Jules Verne were local to the area. Verne alluded to the mountain in much of his literature, Captain Bugarach was the hero in ‘‘Clovis Dardentor.’’ Bugarach is said to be where Verne found both the inspiration and the entrance for ‘‘Journey to the Center of the Earth.” His books are said to be written in code to protect the mystery of Rennes-le-Château. Verne burned all of his papers at the end of his life to protect these secrets. There were also many tales of President François Mitterrand’s being helicoptered onto the peak, of mysterious digs conducted by the Nazis and later the Mossad, the Israeli secret services. Finally, Bugarach is also thought to be the inspiration behind ‘‘Close Encounters of the Third Kind,’’ as Spielberg spent time around the mountain.

It is a tiny area in rural France, which adds to the mystery of why it is so rich in such significant histories, stories and myths.

Jacques Le Bris's insight:

An exhibition of Monahan’s photographs will be on view at The Copper House Gallery in Dublin through July 20.

No comment yet.
Scooped by Jacques Le Bris

Bugarach prépare l'après-Apocalypse

Bugarach prépare l'après-Apocalypse | Bugarach | Scoop.it
Le podium attire l'attention des futurs survivants sur leur avenir. Ils seront obligés de s'organiser et créer une nouvelle communauté qui devra, comme toujours, être gérée par un chef.
ECAL/Denis Rouèche


Après l'Apocalypse du 21 décembre 2012, seul Bugarach survivra. Cette prédiction, issue des théories sur la fin du monde qui enflamment la Toile, a donné des sueurs froides à Jean-Pierre Delord, le maire de cette petite bourgade de 194 âmes, coincée entre la Catalogne du Nord et le Pays Cathare, dans le sud de la France.

Voici un an et demi, Jean-Pierre Delord faisait part de ses craintes de voir débarquer des centaines sinon des milliers «d'illuminés» le 21 décembre 2012. Depuis, Bugarach a eu les honneurs de la presse nationale et internationale, jusqu'au prestigieux New York Times. Le nombre de touristes est passé du simple au double. Jean-Pierre Delord a donc décidé d'assumer l'image de «village de fin du monde», et de l'exploiter.

«Nous travaillons avec une société qui, à travers internet, va proposer aux habitants du monde entier de stocker des lettres testamentaires à Bugarach», explique Jean-Pierre Delord. «Je vais aussi créer une fondation pour préserver la montagne de Bugarach, où se rendent les pèlerins», dit-il.



Voilà pour les projets. L'exploitation touristique est, elle, déjà en marche. «Nous vendons par exemple des cartes postales à 1 euro qui représentent le pic avec une soucoupe volante au-dessus. Nous les avons signées David Vincent, le personnage principale de la série ‹Les Envahisseurs›», rigole le maire. «Par contre, il est faux de dire que le prix du terrain a augmenté en raison de cette histoire de fin du monde», poursuit-il. Selon lui, les prix ont en fait augmenté avec l'arrivée des Anglo-Saxons.

Jean-Pierre Delord ne craint-il pas le discrédit si, par un heureux hasard, la fin du monde n'arrivait pas le 21 décembre 2012? «Non. Des experts disent maintenant que la date est fausse. L'Apocalypse n'aurait en fait pas lieu cette année mais dans 15 ans. Cela nous fait 15 ans de promotion devant nous!», s'amuse-t-il.




No comment yet.
Scooped by Jacques Le Bris

Challenging French rural eco plumbing freaks out pilgrims to Bugarach apocalypse site funny satire story

Challenging French rural eco plumbing freaks out pilgrims to Bugarach apocalypse site funny satire story | Bugarach | Scoop.it
Aude, France - A camper van convoy heading south to the apocalyptic 2012 town of Bugarach is threatening to sue UK tour operators HippyWheels amid a gruelling three day experience of local extreme plumbing.

Treacherous wintry conditions saw the close-down of all tourist facilities sending 40 Yuletide travellers packed inside five souped-up Airstreams into unchartered rural territory.

The pilgrimage was to have arrived in the Bugarach UFO mothership base on Russian Christmas Day 7 January in preparation for the first of the year's full moon ceremonies.

But it ended up holed up in a dilapidated former campsite just south of Rennes-Les-Bains on the D14.

A fiendish configuration of mountains and dense forestry sees the ancient beauty spot untrammeled by wi-fi, cell phone signals or any form of organised electricity - something that the HippyWheels Winter 2011-12 catalogue failed to point out in its blurb.

Then late this evening a faint signal via a combination of carrier pigeon, morse code, semaphore and G-1 managed to transmit an SOS from stranded travelers to the Pyrenean mountain site.

Their plight chiefly concerns primitive conditions after onboard portaloos all froze up and/or caved in under unrelenting pressure during the stranding.

A diary entry retrieved from traveling tour guide Miss Sky Lotusblossom advises that 'at zero degrees on an ass-freezing January night the (only) open plan outdoor composting lav enjoys a panoramic 360-degree view of surrounding countryside and is the most sophisticated sanitation facility for 30 miles.'

Bugarach has become the epicenter of a worldwide apocalyptic movement claiming special sanctuary for all who shelter within a one mile radius of its extraordinary peak.

Last year its Mayor Jean-Pierre Delord threatened to call in the army if the influx of wacky-baccy Mayan 2012 apocalypse travelers continued to swamp the town's otherwise peaceful life.

Tales of how the late French President François Mitterrand had once been curiously 'heliported' on to the Bugarach outcrop's peak, of some mystery digs conducted by the Nazis and later Mossad have all culminated in creating the world's biggest magnet for Armageddon nutz.

The next scheduled UFO flypast near the Arc de Triomphe is this Friday the 13th of January.

No comment yet.
Scooped by Jacques Le Bris

For End of the World, a French Peak Holds Allure

For End of the World, a French Peak Holds Allure | Bugarach | Scoop.it

A myth surrounds the Bugarach mountain and its supposed magnetism. Some people plan to take refuge there on Dec. 21, 2012.


Published: January 30, 2011


BUGARACH, France — The rocky mountain of Bugarach, rising just over 4,000 feet in the Corbières Mountains, in one of the poorest and least populated areas of France, has long attracted hikers and nature lovers who like to wander its gentle slopes in search of rare species of orchids.


But in recent years, the mystic beauty and remoteness of the mountain has lured another, less common variety of hiker. Residents call them “the esoterics,” people who believe that the end of the world is coming — don’t forget to mark your calendar — on Dec. 21, 2012.

Last month, the mayor of Bugarach, a tiny village at the foot of the mountain in the southern district of Aude, alerted the local authorities after he read on Internet forums that believers in the apocalypse planned to take refuge here in 2012.

“Some Web sites in the U.S. were selling tickets to come here,” said Jean-Pierre Delord, the mayor. “We are 200 locals; we don’t want 2,000 to 3,000 utopians showing up in Bugarach.”

Some French and international Web sites devoted to the apocalypse claim that the mountain of Bugarach is a sacred place that will protect them from the end of the world. Some even believe that, on doomsday, they will be spirited away by a group of aliens who live under the mountain. The date in question is when a 5,125-year cycle in the Mayan calendar supposedly comes to a close.

A local innkeeper, Sigrid Benard, who offers rooms only in the summer, said she had received numerous calls from people wishing to reserve rooms and mobile homes from the beginning of December 2012 to the end of January.

“People know I’m closed in the winter,” Mrs. Benard said. “But those people said they wanted to come three weeks before the apocalypse and book the week afterward to see what happens.”

Many here, including the mayor, do not want to see Bugarach transformed into a safe haven for those he called “apocalypse believers and lunatics.” They point to an increasing presence of “esoterics,” who settled in Bugarach around the year 2000 and who are also attracted to the tranquillity, the low price of real estate and the history of the area.

“Those people belong to a New Age circle of influence,” Mr. Delord said. “Today, they do business on pure fables; they build inns and organize collective therapies.”

One of the esoterics is a former teacher named Jean. With a wise look and linen pants in winter, he resembles a neo-hippie. He recently settled in a yurt in the forest near Bugarach with hopes of building what he calls “the civilization of the heart.”

“The apocalypse we believe in is the end of a certain world and the beginning of another, a new spiritual world,” Jean said, refusing to give his last name because of the increasing local controversy.

“The year 2012 is the end of a cycle of suffering,” he said. Bugarach is “one of the major chakras of the earth, a place devoted to welcome the energies of tomorrow.”

For other people around France, Bugarach is not just a quaint village with a mountain.

“We all know that aliens are there for thousands of years,” said Paul Ponssot, the owner of a Paris-based bookstore specializing in esoteric literature. “They may be the forces who will help us get through 2012.”

In the little town, even the most pragmatic visitors acknowledged the special atmosphere of the place, silent and vibrant.

“Bugarach is like California in the ’60s,” said Didier Gromaire, a social worker from Chambéry who spent three months in Bugarach last year. “Things appear more clearly here; when you arrive, you feel that this is the beginning of a new life.”

Bugarach and its surroundings still bear significant traces of medieval religious sects and orders, including the Cathars, who built remarkable castles nearby.

A few miles away sits the village of Rennes-le-Château, whose supposedly hidden treasures have inspired many international authors, including Dan Brown, author of “The Da Vinci Code.”

The peak of Bugarach has long been called “the sacred mountain”; geologists say that soon after the mountain was formed, it exploded and the top landed upside-down. The mountain is also said to have inspired French authors like Jules Verne in “Journey to the Center of the Earth,” and American filmmakers like Steven Spielberg in “Close Encounters of the Third Kind.”

Several reports circulating on the Internet even suggested that former President François Mitterrand visited the peak by helicopter, that there was often a halo of cloud shaped like a spaceship around the summit and that planes never flew over the mountain because of supposed magnetic waves.

“People built an entire myth around the magnetism of the mountain,” said Jean-Luc Lamotte, 60, a retired businessman who owns a house nearby.

Some residents say that they sometimes see parades of people, their arms crossed in an X shape, climbing the peak with figurines of the Virgin Mary in their hands.

Ismo Nykanen, a Finnish journalist who settled in Bugarach with his family a few years ago, said he once spotted several groups of people, some dressed in white, some naked, carrying a ball and a golden ring hung by a thread.

“They stay several months during the summer in campers parked at the bottom of the peak,” Mr. Nykanen said. His teenage daughter, Elsa, said she once saw a truck with a message spray-painted on its door: “Collective suicide: Bugarach 2012.”

Cristina Breiner owns a guesthouse in the nearby village of Rennes-les-Bains. She was recently brought by a friend to a meeting of local esoterics.

“They dress like ordinary people and strongly believe that someone in the sky is sending them messages,” Mrs. Breiner said.

Mayor Delord is trying to figure out how to curb new influxes of utopians in the area, especially with the apocalypse coming. In a country where the government lists at least 30 movements preaching the apocalypse, the mayor’s concerns are not abstract.

“If it happens as in Mr. Spielberg’s ‘Close Encounters of the Third Kind,’ ” Mr. Delord said, “it would be necessary to call in the army.”




No comment yet.
Scooped by Jacques Le Bris

Pour échapper à la fin du monde Grand Sud Insolite et secret

Pour échapper à la fin du monde Grand Sud Insolite et secret | Bugarach | Scoop.it

Si l'on en croit un calendrier maya, la fin du monde est programmée pour le 21 ou le 23 décembre 2012.
Une autre traduction de ce calendrier donne la même date, mais en 2011.
Le petit village de Bugarach, dans le département de l'Aude, serait épargné par la catastrophe.
Le village est situé  à 22 kilomètres de Limoux, au pied du Pech de Bugarach qui culmine à 1230 mètres d' altitude.
Les origines du village remontent au XIIIe siècle et compte aujourd'hui 189 habitants et depuis très longtemps on nomme le pic qui domine le village : "La Montagne Sacrée".
Est-ce son passé en Pays Cathare, de la proximité de Rennes le Château et du mystère du trésor de l'Abbé Saunière, toujours est-il que cette petite région est synonyme d'ésotérisme et d''occultisme.
On dit que le Pic serait une zone d'accueil d'OVNIS.
Depuis le début des années 2000, le village est envahi de curieux et de communautés qui viennent pour découvrir ou se protéger de cette fin du monde qui se rapprocherait.
Conséquence commerciale : le prix de l' immobilier a fortement augmenté.

Ce qu'en pense le Professeur Yves Lignon

Point culminant du massif des Corbières, dans l'Aude, ce n'est pas d'aujourd'hui que le Pic de Bugarach est entouré de fantasmes et de rumeurs.
Déjà, passant par là, un peu avant 1795, pour travailler à l'élaboration du système métrique, le savant Pierre Méchain a été accusé de réveiller les démons de la montagne.
Depuis environ trente ans on évoque surtout de mystérieuses bases d'OVNIS et des forces étranges permettant de se ressourcer.
Rien n'appuie ces déclarations tout comme rien ne confirme que les avions de ligne ont pour consigne de contourner le Pic ou que celui-ci serait sous surveillance militaire étroite depuis une décision de François Mitterrand.
Et les choses ont empiré à partir de décembre 2010 lorsque de beaux parleurs se sont mis à raconter que le la fin du monde aurait lieu le 21 décembre 2012 et que grâce aux extra-terrestres seul le Bugarach serait préservé.
Cette prédiction, soit disant tirée du calendrier maya, ne peut venir que d'ignares en mathématiques, le calendrier en question étant bien plus complexe que le nôtre.
Quant à faire d'un lieu aussi magnifique le refuge d'une humanité prise de panique c'est confondre un film de Spielberg avec un livre d'astronomie. 

Il suffit de taper "Buragach" sur votre ordinateur et il arrive aussitôt des milliers d'articles...

No comment yet.
Scooped by Jacques Le Bris

Hippies head for Noah's Ark: Queue here for rescue aboard alien spaceship

Hippies head for Noah's Ark: Queue here for rescue aboard alien spaceship | Bugarach | Scoop.it
A mountain looming over a French commune with a population of just 200 is being touted as a modern Noah's Ark when doomsday arrives – supposedly less than nine months from now.

A rapidly increasing stream of New Age believers – or esoterics, as locals call them – have descended in their camper van-loads on the usually picturesque and tranquil Pyrenean village of Bugarach. They believe that when apocalypse strikes on 21 December this year, the aliens waiting in their spacecraft inside Pic de Bugarach will save all the humans near by and beam them off to the next age.

As the cataclysmic date – which, according to eschatological beliefs and predicted astrological alignments, concludes a 5,125-year cycle in the Mesoamerican Long Count calendar – nears, the goings-on around the peak have become more bizarre and ritualistic.

For decades, there has been a belief that Pic de Bugarach, which, at 1,230 metres, is the highest in the Corbières mountain range, possesses an eery power. Often called the "upside-down mountain" – geologists think that it exploded after its formation and the top landed the wrong way up – it is thought to have inspired Jules Verne's Journey to the Centre of the Earth and Steven Spielberg's Close Encounters of the Third Kind. Since the 1960s, it has attracted New Agers, who insist that it emits special magnetic waves.

Further, rumours persist that the country's late president François Mitterrand was transported by helicopter on to the peak, while the Nazis, and, later, Israel's Mossad, performed mysterious digs there. Now the nearby village is awash with New Agers, who have boosted the local economy, though their naked group climbs up to the peak have raised concerns as well as eyebrows. Among other oddities, some hikers have been spotted scaling the mountain carrying a ball with a golden ring, strung together by a single thread.

A grizzled man wearing a white linen smock, who calls himself Jean, set up a yurt in the forest a couple of years ago to prepare for the earth's demise. "The apocalypse we believe in is the end of a certain world and the beginning of another," he offers. "A new spiritual world. The year 2012 is the end of a cycle of suffering. Bugarach is one of the major chakras of the earth, a place devoted to welcoming the energies of tomorrow."

Upwards of 100,000 people are thought to be planning a trip to the mountain, 30 miles west of Perpignan, in time for 21 December, and opportunistic entrepreneurs are shamelessly cashing in on the phenomenon. While American travel agents have been offering special, one-way deals to witness the end of the world, a neighbouring village, Saint-Paul de Fenouillet, has produced a wine to celebrate the occasion.

Jean-Pierre Delord, the perplexed mayor of Bugarach, has flagged up the situation to the French authorities, requesting they scramble the army to the tiny village for fear of a mass suicide. It has also caught the attention of France's sect watchdog, Miviludes.

A genial sexagenarian, Mr Delord says: "We've seen a huge rise in visitors. Already this year more than 20,000 people have climbed right to the top, and last year we had 10,000 hikers, which was a significant rise on the previous 12 months. They think Pic de Bugarach is 'un garage à ovnis' [an alien garage]. The villagers are exasperated: the exaggerated importance of something which they see as completely removed from reality is bewildering. After 21 December, this will surely return to normal."

Masking his fears of what might happen on 21 December, Mr Delord jokes that he will throw a party and supply vin chaud and cheese. "I'm sure we'll have a little fete to celebrate that we're still alive," he smiles. "I suppose it's up to each of us to find our own way."

No comment yet.
Scooped by Jacques Le Bris

Bugarach: the mystery surrounding the village

Bugarach: the mystery surrounding the village | Bugarach | Scoop.it
The village of Bugarach, population 189, is situated 24 miles southwest of Carcassonne in the Aude department, southwestern France.


The Telegraph :


The farming village is in the region of the Cathar castles, situated on spectacular rocky outcrops. Regarded as heretics by the Catholic Church, Cathars sought refuge in these castles in the 13th century when Pope Innocent III launched a full scale crusade against them.
The village lies next to the Pic de Bugarach, a rocky peak which, at 1230 metres, is the highest point of the Corbières range of hills. The peak is dwarfed however by the nearby Pyrenees and offers splendid views of the range.
Made of limestone with galleries of caves beneath it, the peak is a geological oddity, since its top layers are millions of years older than its bottom ones, making it an "upside down mountain".
The peak of Bugarach has been shrouded in mystery, with various claims that it houses aliens in cavities beneath the rock.
The internet abounds with tales of the late President François Mitterrand being curiously heliported onto the peak, of mysterious digs conducted by the Nazis and later Mossad, the Israeli secret services. There is talk of the area, near to the Cathar castles, holding the Holy Grail or the treasure of the Templars. A visit to Bugarach is said to have inspired Steven Spielberg in his film, Close Encounters of the Third Kind – although the actual mountain he used is Devil's Tower in Wyoming.


Nostradamus, the French apothecary from Provence, is said to have stayed in the area and found the "vibrations" of Bugarach to be positive.
Others say Bugarach is where Jules Verne found the entrance and the inspiration for A Journey to the Centre of the Earth.
Bugarach is in the Languedoc-Roussillon, the world's largest wine growing region.

No comment yet.
Scooped by Jacques Le Bris

French village which will 'survive 2012 Armageddon' plagued by visitors

French village which will 'survive 2012 Armageddon' plagued by visitors | Bugarach | Scoop.it

The mayor of Bugarach, Jean-Pierre Delord stands on the outskirts of the village


The Telegraph :


The mayor of a picturesque French village has threatened to call in the army to seal it off from a tide of New Age fanatics and UFO watchers, who are convinced it is the only place on Earth to be spared Armageddon in 2012.



By Henry Samuel, Paris 5:00PM GMT 21 Dec 2010

Bugarach, population 189, is a peaceful farming village in the Aude region, southwestern France and sits at the foot of the Pic de Bugarach, the highest mountain in the Corbières wine-growing area.
But in the past few months, the quiet village has been inundated by groups of esoteric outsiders who believe the peak is an "alien garage".
According to them, extraterrestrials are quietly waiting in a massive cavity beneath the rock for the world to end, at which point they will leave, taking, it is hoped, a lucky few humans with them.
Most believe Armageddon will take place on December 21, 2012, the end date of the ancient Maya calendar, at which point they predict human civilisation will come to an end. Another favourite date mentioned is 12, December, 2012. They see Bugarach as one of perhaps several "sacred mountains" sheltered from the cataclysm.
"This is no laughing matter," Jean-Pierre Delord, the mayor, told The Daily Telegraph.


"If tomorrow 10,000 people turn up, as a village of 200 people we will not be able to cope. I have informed the regional authorities of our concerns and want the army to be at hand if necessary come December 2012."
Mr Delord said people had been coming to the village for the past 10 years or so in search of alien life following a post in an UFO review by a local man, who has since died. "He claimed he had seen aliens and heard the humming of their spacecraft under the mountain," he said.
The internet abounds with tales of the late President François Mitterrand being curiously heliported on to the peak, of mysterious digs conducted by the Nazis and later Mossad, the Israeli secret services.
A visit to Bugarach is said to have inspired Steven Spielberg in his film, Close Encounters of the Third Kind – although the actual mountain he used is Devil's Tower in Wyoming. It is also where Jules Verne found the entrance and the inspiration for A Journey to the Centre of the Earth.
Recently, however, interest in the site had skyrocketed, said the mayor, with online UFO websites, many in the US, advising people to seek shelter in Bugarach as the countdown to Armageddon commences.
"Many come and pray on the mountainside. I've even seen one man doing some ritual totally nude up there," said Mr Delord.
Sigrid Benard, who runs the Maison de la Nature guesthouse, said UFO tourists were taking over. "At first, my clientele was 72 per cent ramblers. Today, I have 68 per cent 'esoteric visitors'," he said.
Several "Ufologists" have bought up properties in the small hamlet of Le Linas, in the mountain's shadow for "extortionate" prices, and locals have complained they are being priced out of the market. Strange sect-like courses are held for up to €800 a week. "For this price, you are introduced to a guru, made to go on a procession, offered a christening and other rubbish, all payable in cash," said Mr Delord.
Valerie Austin, a retired Briton from Newcastle who settled in Bugarach 22 years ago who said the alien watchers were spoiling the village atmosphere.
"You can't go for a peaceful walk anymore. It's a beautiful area, but now you find people chanting lying around meditating. Everybody has the right to their own beliefs, but the place no longer feels like ours." She said alien watchers planted strange objects on the mountainside.
Recently she found a black virgin statuette cemented to the rock face.
Although she described the alien claims as "total rubbish", she said there was nevertheless something special about the place.
"It has a magnetic force in the scientific sense of the word. There is a special feeling here, but if I really believed the world were about to end, I'd have a whale of a time over the next two years" rather than look for salvation, she said.

No comment yet.