Brooks Composite
15 views | +0 today
Follow
Brooks Composite
This is a scoop about Asthma
Curated by Ayub Ahmed
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Ayub Ahmed
Scoop.it!

Dialysis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In medicine dialysis (from Greek dialusis,"διάλυσις", meaning dissolution, dia, meaning through, and lysis, meaning loosening or splitting) is a process for removing waste and excess water from the blood, and is used primarily to provide an artificial replacement for lost kidney function in people with renal failure.[1] Dialysis may be used for those with an acute disturbance in kidney function (acute kidney injury, previously acute renal failure), or progressive but chronically worsening kidney function–a state known as chronic kidney disease stage 5 (previously chronic renal failure or end-stage renal disease). The latter form may develop over months or years, but in contrast to acute kidney injury is not usually reversible, and dialysis is regarded as a "holding measure" until a renal transplant can be performed, or sometimes as the only supportive measure in those for whom a transplant would be inappropriate.[2]

The kidneys have important roles in maintaining health. When healthy, the kidneys maintain the body's internal equilibrium of water and minerals (sodium, potassium, chloride, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, sulfate). The acidic metabolism end-products that the body cannot get rid of via respiration are also excreted through the kidneys. The kidneys also function as a part of the endocrine system, producing erythropoietin and calcitriol. Erythropoietin is involved in the production of red blood cells and calcitriol plays a role in bone formation.[3] Dialysis is an imperfect treatment to replace kidney function because it does not correct the compromised endocrine functions of the kidney. Dialysis treatments replace some of these functions through diffusion (waste removal) and ultrafiltration (fluid removal).[4]

Dr. Willem Kolff, a Dutch physician, constructed the first working dialyzer in 1943 during the Nazi occupation of the Netherlands.[5] Due to the scarcity of available resources, Kolff had to improvise and build the initial machine using sausage casings, beverage cans, a washing machine, and various other items that were available at the time. Over the following two years, Kolff used his machine to treat 16 patients suffering from acute kidney failure, but the results were unsuccessful. Then, in 1945, a 67-year-old comatose woman regained consciousness following 11 hours of hemodialysis with the dialyzer, and lived for another seven years before dying of an unrelated condition. She was the first-ever patient successfully treated with dialysis.[5]

Ayub Ahmed's insight:

Dialysis(treatments):

 

When a kidney suffers from an acute disturbance such as acute renal failure, the kidney becomes unable to preform it's function. When this happens, a person needs a way to filter their blood to prevent a buildup of wastes in the blood. The process of removing wastes from blood using a specialized device is called dialysis. Dialysis is used as an artificial replacement for renal failure. Dialysis is defined as "the diffusion of dissolved substances through a semipermeable membrane." The dissolved substances move from a greater concentration of wastes, to a low concentration. In this case, the waste substances move from blood into the dialysate. Useful substances can be moved the other way around, from the dialysate into the blood stream. For example, the pH of the blood can be adjusted by transferring acidic or basic substances into the blood. There are two types of dialysis: hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis. Hemodialysis cleans blood using an artificial membrane that is supplied with blood by an artery in the arm. Peritoneal dialysis uses the lining of intestines as a membrane instead of an artificial one. In hemodialysis, blood is pumped from an artery in the arm into a machine which seperates wates from the blood. The clean blood is then returned back to the body. This type of dialysis takes three to five hours to complete and must be done three to four times a week. In peritoneal dialysis, a tube called a catheter is inserted into the abdomen. A natural process of diffusion takes place and the dirty dialysate is removed. Thus leaving the clean blood within the body and removing certain wastes. 

 

Kidney Transplants:

Dialysis is a short term solution for a bad kidney, however, if a kidney has less than 10% of kidney function they can't function with just dialysis. These people will have to get a kidney transplant. Kidney transplant sucess rates are high which means many people who get kidneys transplanted survive the operaion. A person can live with just one kidney because the bod y can sense when the kidney is gone so the other kidney gets bigger and compensates for the loss of the other kidney. Plus, there is now a minimally invasive surgery to remove kidneys which also raises the survival rate of donors. The kidney may be one of the best organs to donate because of the advances of modern medicine. The bad part is that Canada has only 14 donors per million people which makes a high demand for kidneys. There are thousands of people waiting for organs in Canada and 75% of them are waiting for kidney's.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ayub Ahmed
Scoop.it!

11 Facts About Asthma

11 Facts About Asthma | Brooks Composite | Scoop.it
There are 4,000 deaths due to asthma each year, many of which are avoidable with proper treatment and care.
The annual cost of asthma is estimated to be nearly $18 billion.
Hispanics may hav
Ayub Ahmed's insight:

Interesting Facts:

 

There are 4000 deaths a year that are caused by asthma.

 

The annual cost of asthma is approximately 18 billion dollars

 

Every day about 30 000 Americans have an asthma attack.

more...
BCHS-Ryan Lok's comment, March 7, 2013 2:41 PM
I never knew that
Ayub Ahmed's comment, March 7, 2013 2:49 PM
You learn something new everyday.
Scooped by Ayub Ahmed
Scoop.it!

Asthma - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Asthma (from the Greek ἅσθμα, ásthma, "panting") is a common chronic inflammatory disease of the airways characterized by variable and recurring symptoms, reversible airflow obstruction, and bronchospasm.[2] Common symptoms include wheezing, coughing, chest tightness, and shortness of breath.[3]

Asthma is thought to be caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors.[4] Its diagnosis is usually based on the pattern of symptoms, response to therapy over time, and spirometry.[5] It is clinically classified according to the frequency of symptoms, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), and peak expiratory flow rate.[6] Asthma may also be classified as atopic (extrinsic) or non-atopic (intrinsic)[7] where atopy refers to a predisposition toward developing type 1 hypersensitivity reactions.[8]

Treatment of acute symptoms is usually with an inhaled short-acting beta-2 agonist (such as salbutamol) and oral corticosteroids.[9] In very severe cases intravenous corticosteroids, magnesium sulfate and hospitalization maybe required.[10] Symptoms can be prevented by avoiding triggers, such as allergens[11] and irritants, and by the use of inhaled corticosteroids.[12]Long-acting beta agonists (LABA) or leukotriene antagonists may be used in addition to inhaled corticosteroids if asthma symptoms remain uncontrolled.[13] The prevalence of asthma has increased significantly since the 1970s. As of 2011, 235–300 million people were affected globally,[14][15] including about 250,000 deaths.[15]

Ayub Ahmed's insight:

 Overview:

 

Asthma is the inflammation of the airways. Asthma is chracterized by airflow obstruction and variable/recurring symptoms. It is believed that asthma can be caused by either genetic or environmental factors. The diagnosis for asthma usually corresponds with the pattern of symptoms, response to therapy, and spirometry. Some individuals with asthma have a higher chance of getting other diseases such as sleep apnea, rhinosinustis, and reflux disease. There are many environmental conditions that are associated with asthma. A few environmental conditions include allergens, formeldahyde exposure, phthalates which are found in PVC, and endotoxins. All of these factors contribute to asthma.

 

Signs and Symptoms:

 

Symptoms of asthma include recurrent wheezing, shortness of breath, chest tightness, and coughing. Sputum can be made by the lung but is often hard to bring up. After an attack the sputum can be pus like and thick. Asthma usually gets worse at night and early in the morning. Asthma can rarely have symptoms for some, and others may get persistent symptoms depending on the individual.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ayub Ahmed
Scoop.it!

Asthma Prevention & Asthma Triggers

Understanding asthma triggers is necessary to get asthma under control and key for asthma prevention. Many different things may trigger your asthma. Learn about indoor and outdoor allergens, medications, foods, and other asthma triggers.
Ayub Ahmed's insight:

Prevention:

 

The best way to prevent an asthma attack is to stay away from your triggers. A trigger is something that may cause irritation and thus cause an asthma attack. Some triggers are smoking, dust mites, mold, cockroaches and other pests, pets, and nitrogen dioxide.When an asthma attack occurs, the best way to stop it is by using an inhaler. People with asthma have a constant inflammation in the airways which can be worsened by triggers such as pollen and dust. Another way to prevent asthma attacks is to avoid foods that may e a trigger such as fish, soy, peanuts, and other common food allergies. Those who have excercise induced asthma should avoid heavy excercise and see a healthcare professional. Another way to prevent asthma is to keep healthy, sometimes the cold and other respiratory infections cause an asthma attack.

Always have a inhaler ready just in case an asthma attack occurs. Remember, the best way to prevent an asthma attack is to avoid the things that can cause it.

more...
BCHS-Ryan Lok's comment, March 7, 2013 2:42 PM
I should try that
Ayub Ahmed's comment, March 7, 2013 2:48 PM
That sounds like a good idea
Scooped by Ayub Ahmed
Scoop.it!

Symptoms of Asthma: Shortness of Breath, Chest Tightness, and More

Symptoms of Asthma: Shortness of Breath, Chest Tightness, and More | Brooks Composite | Scoop.it
Asthma symptoms vary. Learn the common, and not so common, signs of asthma.
Ayub Ahmed's insight:

Signs and Symptoms:

 

A few syptoms of asthma are coughing (especially at night), wheezing, shortness of breath, and chest tightness/pain/pressure. Early warning signs of asthma can include frequent cough, loss of breath or shortness of breath, feeling tired or weak(mostly while excercising), trouble sleeping, and changes in lung fuction. During an asthma attack the symptoms may be severe coughiong, rapid breathing, chest pain, tightened muscles, and anxiety.

more...
No comment yet.