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4 Myths About Computer Monitors You Might Believe - Make Tech Easier

4 Myths About Computer Monitors You Might Believe - Make Tech Easier | Broadcast Engineering Notes | Scoop.it
when buying a computer monitor, the truth is that most people have no idea how they're being duped into buying displays that throw fancy numbers at them.
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A place to share ideas and articles concerning computers, radio & television broadcast engineering and production
Curated by David Hall
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TVTechnology: LPTVs Lobby for Digital Transition Relief

TVTechnology: LPTVs Lobby for Digital Transition Relief | Broadcast Engineering Notes | Scoop.it
TVTechnology Low-power TV stations are asking to get out from under a digital transition deadline requiring them build new facilities potentially rendered useless by next year’s spectrum incentive auction.
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A new virus is tearing apart Windows

A new virus is tearing apart Windows | Broadcast Engineering Notes | Scoop.it
A new virus is on the rise, and this one is a doozy.Dubbed the 'Bladabindi,' this is a multi-identity virus that has the capability to fool your firewall by adding itself to t...
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Russ Roberts's curator insight, July 26, 4:10 PM

Thanks to reporter David Hall for sending this warning from computer guru Kim Komando.  The bad boy  in this scenario is something called the "Bladabindi" virus which compromises your PC by fooling your windows firewall and adding itself to the exceptions list.  The virus harvests IDs and personal information by penetrating your keyboard, webcam, browsers, and Windows information.  If you suspect this virus has occupied your PC, you can possibly eliminate it by scanning your PC with a "tough" scanner and cleaner kit.  Scan and clean any USB external drives that you use with a USB cleaner.  Keep security patches updated.  The virus apparently is spread through infected USB drives.  A cautionary tale for all amateur radio operators using the Windows system.  Aloha de Russ (KH6JRM).

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The Broadcasters' Desktop Resource Volume 5, #52

The Broadcasters' Desktop Resource Volume 5, #52 | Broadcast Engineering Notes | Scoop.it
Information and resources for the broadcast engineer and manager.
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Russ Roberts's curator insight, July 26, 3:54 PM

Thanks to reporter David Hall for this installment of "The Broadcasters' Desktop Reference."  You don't have to be a broadcast engineer to appreciate the topics discussed in this segment of the BDR.  Areas covered include:  A Quick Guide to FCC fines; FCC opens 90 day window for Low Power FM (LPFM); Recovery in the aftermath of a disaster; Ask the lawyer--your FCC questions answered; and testing solid state rectifiers.  There's always something of interest in these BDR volumes.  Check it out.  Aloha de Russ (KH6JRM).

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Live Mixing Know-how from Buford Jones, Part 2 | The SVC Blogcast

Show 110-2 To hear the podcast press the play button or download here. Or read the transcription.In this edition of the SVC Podcast, SVC Contributing Editor Bennett Liles wraps up ...
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Congressman Claims FCC Won’t Enforce, Investigate Broadcast Indecency

Congressman Claims FCC Won’t Enforce, Investigate Broadcast Indecency | Broadcast Engineering Notes | Scoop.it
Congressman chastises the FCC for not adhering to broadcast standards covering indecency.
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Russ Roberts's curator insight, July 22, 10:20 PM

Thanks to reporter David Hall for this juicy tidbit from the commercial broadcast world.  It seems as if everyone connected with broadcasting, and to some extent in Amateur Radio, wants the FCC to "crack down" on indecent programs and advertising on the airwaves.  Oklahoma Congressman James Lankford claims that complaints of indecency on broadcast stations have gone "uninvestigated and unenforced."  All well and good, but remember, FCC enforcement usually means more personnel and equipment to monitor the airwaves for compliance.  That translates into money, something Congress has been unwilling to release for many worthwhile projects.  We can all desire better enforcement on a number of issues, both commercial and amateur, but, until Congress shows a willingness to pay for extra monitoring, all of this wrangling is just talk.  Show me the money and then I'll believe the complaints have merit.  Aloha de Russ (KH6JRM).

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Forget Lean and Agile – It’s Time to be Anticipatory

Forget Lean and Agile – It’s Time to be Anticipatory | Broadcast Engineering Notes | Scoop.it
We are all good at reacting and responding, putting out fires, and crisis management. In addition, organizations large and small have learned how to be lean and agile, and how to best execute a
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MIT May Have Just Solved All Your Data Center Network Lag Issues - Slashdot

MIT May Have Just Solved All Your Data Center Network Lag Issues - Slashdot | Broadcast Engineering Notes | Scoop.it
alphadogg (971356) writes A group of MIT researchers say they've invented a new technology that should all but eliminate queue length in data center networking. The technology will be fully described in a paper presented at the annual conference of the ACM Special Interest Group on Data Communicatio...
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Mazwai - Free to use HD video

Mazwai - Free to use HD video | Broadcast Engineering Notes | Scoop.it
Download free creative commons HD video clips & footages.

Via Nik Peachey
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Joaquín Ballester's curator insight, July 21, 2:31 AM

Clips de video CC.

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, July 21, 12:59 PM

Mazwai Uso libre de video HD.

Alfredo Corell's curator insight, July 22, 2:13 PM

a new useful HD video collection

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Some UHD TVs now cheaper than most "branded" HD sets at under $500 (£295, €367) for a 40" display

Some UHD TVs now cheaper than most "branded" HD sets at under $500 (£295, €367) for a 40" display | Broadcast Engineering Notes | Scoop.it
You can now buy a UHD, 40" TV for less than most "branded" HD TVs  Le...
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The Story of Television - 1956 RCA Educational Documentary - WDTVLIVE42 - YouTube

The Radio Corporation of America (RCA) traces scientific advances related the development of television from the 1920's to 1950's, including the introduction...
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Russ Roberts's curator insight, July 18, 8:40 PM

Thanks to reporter David Hall for this fascinating documentary on the early days of television.  This film really brought back memories of watching Hopalong Cassidy, Captain Video, Kukla-Fran-and-Ollie, and the Cisco Kid.  This is a "keeper" for your video library.  Aloha de Russ (KH6JRM).

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FCC approves new rules requiring captioning for online video

FCC approves new rules requiring captioning for online video | Broadcast Engineering Notes | Scoop.it
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Why everyone should be shooting 4K - even for HD delivery

Why everyone should be shooting 4K - even for HD delivery | Broadcast Engineering Notes | Scoop.it
Phil Rhodes gets into the technical nitty-gritty of why you should seriously consider 4K acquisition if you're ending in high def. It's becoming incre
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The New Era: Studio Robotics and You!

The New Era: Studio Robotics and You! | Broadcast Engineering Notes | Scoop.it
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Copasetic Flow: Standing Wave Ratio, or SWR, A Ham Radio Exam ...

Copasetic Flow: Standing Wave Ratio, or SWR, A Ham Radio Exam ... | Broadcast Engineering Notes | Scoop.it
The amount of energy reflected is determined by how well the impedances of the antenna, the transmission line, and the transmitter match. The reflected rf energy can enter the transmitter and damage the final radio frequency ...

Via Russ Roberts
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Russ Roberts's curator insight, July 27, 9:11 PM

A nice, compact review (with questions) of the standing wave ratio (SWR).  This brief guide will help aspiring amateur radio licensees understand the working of SWR.  Hamilton Carter (KD0FNR) reviews SWR test questions and highlights  the correct choices.  A good, general review for taking the Technician Class Amateur Radio License.  Aloha de Russ (KH6JRM).

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FCC Okays Modified Sinclair-Allbritton Deal - TV News Check

FCC Okays Modified Sinclair-Allbritton Deal - TV News Check | Broadcast Engineering Notes | Scoop.it
FCC Okays Modified Sinclair-Allbritton Deal TV News Check The FCC late yesterday approved Sinclair Broadcast Group's $985 million purchase of eight ABC affiliates in seven markets from Allbritton Communications, saying it was satisfied with changes...
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Fm-broadcast

Fm-broadcast | Broadcast Engineering Notes | Scoop.it
Verkauf von Rundfunk Sendertechnik, Vermietung von Rundfunk Sendeanlagen
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Wireless Estimator - Breaking News

Wireless Estimator - Breaking News | Broadcast Engineering Notes | Scoop.it
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Radio World: Five Questions: Cris Alexander

Radio World: Five Questions: Cris Alexander | Broadcast Engineering Notes | Scoop.it
Radio World TechBytes talks to Cris Alexander about broadcast engineering’s future and its challenges
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Russ Roberts's curator insight, July 24, 9:13 PM

Thanks to reporter David Hall for sending me to this story.  As a former broadcast technician and news director for Pacific Radio Group (Hawaii Island), the challenges outlined by Cris Alexander, the director of engineering for Crawford Broadcasting Company, certainly ring true.  According to Alexander, these are some of the challenges broadcast engineers are now facing:

1.  The integration of the personal computer into the broadcast infrastructure.

2.  Finding qualified personnel in the RF field.

3.  The disappearance of "Legacy Technologies" and the full integration of computer and IT into the broadcast plant.

4.  Finding competent and available tower contractors.

5.  Keeping employees current in terms of training and technologies.

6.  Becoming more professional in dress, speech, and communications skills.

 

When I first started working in commercial and university radio back in 1967, I was fortunate to have experienced, licensed engineers (remember the 1st phone license from the FCC?) guide me in the art of maintaining a commercial and nonprofit radio station.  Some of my engineering mentors were amateur radio operators and proved valuable later on when I needed help in getting my novice amateur radio license.  These early mentors in my commercial and amateur radio "careers" emphasized the need for continuous training, updated equipment, and basic electronics skills.   Aloha de Russ (KH6JRM).

 

 

 

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Beyond Job Hunting: LinkedIn Launches New Marketplace to Help Professionals Find Meaningful Volunteer Opportunities

Beyond Job Hunting: LinkedIn Launches New Marketplace to Help Professionals Find Meaningful Volunteer Opportunities | Broadcast Engineering Notes | Scoop.it
Are you looking to work toward a cause you believe in while gaining new skills? LinkedIn's new Volunteer Marketplace might help you find your next volunteer opportunity!

Via Dennis T OConnor, David Hall
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Huiying Zhu's comment, May 2, 1:28 AM
As we all know, there are many people want to help others. Linkein is a nonprofits organization, it can help you to be a volunteer, and it built a new work marketplace on website to provide opportunity to someone who really want to use their advantage social skills to make social better.And Just as many professionals seek to work with nonprofits, nonprofits also seek partnerships with professionals.
mofan li's comment, May 2, 2:07 AM
LinkedIn’s new volunteer marketplace will help people find jobs and get now skills. linkeIn is a nonprofits organization and it is a way to use their skills for social good.
ZHESI NING's comment, July 21, 6:07 AM
There are a large number of people want to help others. New volunteers LinkedIn's market will help people find work, now get the skills and the establishment of a site for a new job market, providing opportunities for people who really want to use their strengths, social skills, social better. as many professionals to seek cooperation with non-profit organizations, many companies are looking for professionals who work for them, without any profit at the same time. For this reason, LinkedIn effectiveness in doing so, serving as volunteers and the important role of the enterprise.
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TVTechnology: FCC to Take Up Antenna Structure Rules Aug. 8

TVTechnology: FCC to Take Up Antenna Structure Rules Aug. 8 | Broadcast Engineering Notes | Scoop.it
TVTechnology The FCC will vote on an update its antenna structure rules at its next open meeting scheduled for Friday, Aug. 8, 2014.
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Extending Moore's Law: Shrinking transistor size for smaller, more efficient computers

Extending Moore's Law: Shrinking transistor size for smaller, more efficient computers | Broadcast Engineering Notes | Scoop.it
Over the years, computer chips have gotten smaller thanks to advances in materials science and manufacturing technologies. This march of progress, the doubling of transistors on a microprocessor roughly every two years, is called Moore's Law. But there's one component of the chip-making process in need of an overhaul if Moore's law is to continue: the chemical mixture called photoresist. In a bid to continue decreasing transistor size while increasing computation and energy efficiency, chip-maker Intel has partnered with researchers to design an entirely new kind of resist.

 

Now, in a bid to continue decreasing transistor size while increasing computation and energy efficiency, chip-maker Intel has partnered with researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (Berkeley Lab) to design an entirely new kind of resist. And importantly, they have done so by characterizing the chemistry of photoresist, crucial to further improve performance in a systematic way. The researchers believe their results could be easily incorporated by companies that make resist, and find their way into manufacturing lines as early as 2017.

 

The new resist effectively combines the material properties of two pre-existing kinds of resist, achieving the characteristics needed to make smaller features for microprocessors, which include better light sensitivity and mechanical stability, says Paul Ashby, staff scientist at Berkeley Lab's Molecular Foundry, a DOE Office of Science user facility. "We discovered that mixing chemical groups, including cross linkers and a particular type of ester, could improve the resist's performance." The work is published this week in the journal Nanotechnology.

 

To understand why resist is so important, consider a simplified explanation of how your microprocessors are made. A silicon wafer, about a foot in diameter, is cleaned and coated with a layer of photoresist. Next ultraviolet light is used to project an image of the desired circuit pattern including components such as wires and transistors on the wafer, chemically altering the resist.

 

Depending on the type of resist, light either makes it more or less soluble, so when the wafer is immersed in a solvent, the exposed or unexposed areas wash away. The resist protects the material that makes up transistors and wires from being etched away and can allow the material to be selectively deposited. This process of exposure, rinse and etch or deposition is repeated many times until all the components of a chip have been created.

 

The problem with today's resist, however, is that it was originally developed for light sources that emit so-called deep ultraviolet light with wavelengths of 248 and 193 nanometers. But to gain finer features on chips, the industry intends to switch to a new light source with a shorter wavelength of just 13.5 nanometers. Called extreme ultraviolet (EUV), this light source has already found its way into manufacturing pilot lines. Unfortunately, today's photoresist isn't yet ready for high volume manufacturing.

 

"The semiconductor industry wants to go to smaller and smaller features," explains Ashby. While extreme ultraviolet light is a promising technology, he adds, "you also need the resist materials that can pattern to the resolution that extreme ultraviolet can promise." So teams led by Ashby and Olynick, which include Berkeley Lab postdoctoral researcher Prashant Kulshreshtha, investigated two types of resist. One is called crosslinking, composed of molecules that form bonds when exposed to ultraviolet light. This kind of resist has good mechanical stability and doesn't distort during development -- that is, tall, thin lines made with it don't collapse. But if this is achieved with excessive crosslinking, it requires long, expensive exposures. The second kind of resist is highly sensitive, yet doesn't have the mechanical stability.

When the researchers combined these two types of resist in various concentrations, they found they were able to retain the best properties of both. The materials were tested using the unique EUV patterning capabilities at the CXRO. Using the Nanofabrication and Imaging and Manipulation facilities at the Molecular Foundry to analyze the patterns, the researchers saw improvements in the smoothness of lines created by the photoresist, even as they shrunk the width. Through chemical analysis, they were also able to see how various concentrations of additives affected the cross-linking mechanism and resulting stability and sensitivity.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Russ Roberts
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Russ Roberts's curator insight, July 18, 8:50 PM

Thanks to Dr. Stefan Gruenwald for this fascinating story about extending Moore's law through advances in material science.  The key to shrinking microchips and, thereby, computers, is manipulating ultraviolet light and a chemical mixture called photoresist.  Recent research in reducing the size of computer chips is providing some success in developing resists capable of using different wavelengths of light.  New photoresist technology should hit the marketplace by 2017.  Aloha de Russ (KH6JRM).

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You Have Until Friday Midnight (ET) To Ask The FCC To Save Net Neutrality - SFist

You Have Until Friday Midnight (ET) To Ask The FCC To Save Net Neutrality - SFist | Broadcast Engineering Notes | Scoop.it
You Have Until Friday Midnight (ET) To Ask The FCC To Save Net Neutrality
SFist
Earlier this year, FCC Chairman (and former telecomm lobbyist!
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HOW RADIO WORKS - 1943 - YouTube

The theory and operation of early radio
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LBA Group, Inc.· 

Wayback Tech - How Radio Worked In 1943!

This video takes us back to the reality of radio during the WWII period. Radio is so pervasive in our lives and businesses today, its fascinating to look back 70 years to the technology and applications when it was new and amazing.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jqGAneO79lY

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Russ Roberts's curator insight, July 18, 8:43 PM

Thanks to reporter David Hall for sharing this outstanding, if somewhat dated, tutorial on basic radio.  This video would be nice to show amateur radio license classes--to show them how far radio has come since the mid-point of World War II.  At the very least, this video is worth adding to your library.  Aloha de Russ (KH6JRM).

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The Most Frustrating And Painful Phone Call We've Ever Heard (Except Maybe That AOL One)

The Most Frustrating And Painful Phone Call We've Ever Heard (Except Maybe That AOL One) | Broadcast Engineering Notes | Scoop.it
Remember how we wrote that article about how audio rarely goes viral? Well Ryan Block's 8-minute phone call trying to cancel service from Comcast is going to be one of those exceptions.
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Russ Roberts's curator insight, July 15, 8:31 PM

Thanks to reporter David Hall for this strange story of a simple disconnect gone wrong.  No one should have to face the trial undergone by Ryan Block when he tried to cancel service from Comcast.  I believe this is the same company that's joining with Time-Warner Cable to form a super media company.   As for me, no thanks. I cut the cord a long time ago...I don't miss the "media bundle" offered to me at all.  I save a lot of money and have more time to chase DX or complete those "honey dos" that come with a conjugal relationship. My deepest sympathies to Mr. Block.  The way he was treated was inexcusable.  Aloha de Russ (KH6JRM).

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FCC Votes to Require Closed Captioning for Web Clips

FCC Votes to Require Closed Captioning for Web Clips | Broadcast Engineering Notes | Scoop.it
The move extends FCC rules adopted in 2012 to require closed captioning on clips, not just full-length videos.
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Will this end a great deal of programing?

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