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NYU professor Jay Rosen on news curation in the digital age.

From a "Adapting Journalism to the Web," a conversation between Jay Rosen and Ethan Zuckerman held April 5, 2012. Full video at http://techtv.mit.edu/collect...

Via Guillaume Decugis
BroadbandBreakfast's insight:

Jay Rosen has always been ahead of his time. Before the web become big, it was community journalism. That struck me as silly...but know I realize that it was just a nascent form of Web 2.0 curation.

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hot's comment, April 3, 2013 3:49 AM
nice article :)http://sigithermawan12.blogspot.com/2013/04/penting-panas-perlu-dan-seruu.html
Graham Mulligan's curator insight, April 10, 2013 11:37 AM

Curation and connectivity intersect.

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, April 27, 2013 8:41 AM

I love curation.

BroadbandPolicy
How broadband is impacting jobs and the economy, health care, the environment and energy, public safety, civic engagement, and education
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Sundance Film Festival News - Speakeasy - WSJ

Sundance Film Festival News - Speakeasy - WSJ | BroadbandPolicy | Scoop.it
13 Sundance Film Festival Events You Can Watch Online
By Barbara Chai


This week, about 50,000 attendees will touch down in Park City, Utah, for the annual Sundance Film Festival, where film premieres, music concerts, filmmaker panels and “Cinema Cafe” artist discussions will go on simultaneously from Jan. 22 to Feb. 1.

By now, airfares to Park City and lodging are either sold out or prohibitively expensive, but if you’re unable to make it, you can still participate by watching a number of events streamed live on sundance.org, and available afterward at youtube.com/sff.

The following will be streamed live from the 2015 Sundance Film Festival. Read More »
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Another good set of references about #sundance2015

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FACT SHEET: Broadband That Works: Promoting Competition & Local Choice In Next-Generation Connectivity

FACT SHEET: Broadband That Works: Promoting Competition & Local Choice In Next-Generation Connectivity | BroadbandPolicy | Scoop.it
Last November, the President outlined his plan to keep the Internet open to new competition and innovation by safeguarding net neutrality — which will help ensure no one company can act as a gatekeeper to digital content. But there is more work to do so that every American has access to a free and open internet.
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The White House announces a significant new initiative on broadband competition.

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Silicon Flatirons - Events

Silicon Flatirons - Events | BroadbandPolicy | Scoop.it
The Digital Broadband Migration: First Principles for a Twenty First Century Innovation Policy
February 8-9, 2015
@ University of Colorado Law School, Room 101

Live Stream

The conditions that produced the late twentieth century and early twenty first century boom around the Internet and information technology merit careful examination and analysis. The platform technologies related to computing and networking owe their roots to investments by government supported and private sector-supported research and development from organizations like DARPA, Bell Labs, and Xerox PARC. In a world where "M&A is the new R&D," it remains to be seen how the innovation model of the future will evolve.

The role of established firms vis a vis new upstarts in driving technological progress remains a topic of ongoing conversation, often focusing on Joseph Schumpeter's theory of creative destruction and Clayton Christensen's portrait of disruptive innovation. The implications of such theories for regulatory policy and intellectual property protection in spurring (or hindering) innovation continue to be developed. In practice, for example, policymakers must determine whether law and regulation should provide clearer up-front guidance through rules or more after-the-fact flexibility through standards.
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A key conference from Silicon Flatirons!

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46 Connecticut Towns Sign On To Plan For Massive Municipal Broadband Project

46 Connecticut Towns Sign On To Plan For Massive Municipal Broadband Project | BroadbandPolicy | Scoop.it
Connecticut might be a small state, but they're poised to make a large leap into the 21st century internet. Local officials have announced they're joining together on a plan to create at least 46 l...
BroadbandBreakfast's insight:

Connecticut is pulling together an impressive group of cities seeking Gigabit Networks. See our piece at http://broadbandbreakfast.com/2015/01/with-46-of-connecticuts-cities-and-towns-planning-a-gigabit-network-deadline-for-responses-is-january-13/

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Governor’s broadband plan may face familiar opposition - TheGazette

Governor’s broadband plan may face familiar opposition - TheGazette | BroadbandPolicy | Scoop.it
CEDAR RAPIDS — It has a new name and broad support from the health care, education, public safety, economic development, agriculture and telecommunications industries, but Gov. Terry Branstad’s broadband initiative may face the same hurdles that scuttled it last year.

“Everyone who has rolled out legislature priorities has broadband in there somewhere,” said Kevin Condon, who lobbies for the Iowa Communications Alliance. The 130 companies and cooperatives it represents are supporting the governor’s overall effort.
BroadbandBreakfast's insight:

State broadband efforts, including from Iowa, carrying forward on a variety of fronts.

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International CES: The Internet of Things Hits Homes

International CES: The Internet of Things Hits Homes | BroadbandPolicy | Scoop.it
Household devices that link together through the Internet are likely to energize this year’s International Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.
BroadbandBreakfast's insight:

Internet of things - internet of things - internet of things - from LAST YEAR'S #CES: http://broadbandbreakfast.com/2014/01/the-internet-of-everything-3d-printing-4k-video-and-robotic-drones-among-broadband-breakfasts-top-5-trends-from-ces/

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cn|2 Pure Politics  - Public-private partnership will create 3,000-mile fiber network throughout Kentucky, improve broadband access in mountains

cn|2 Pure Politics  - Public-private partnership will create 3,000-mile fiber network throughout Kentucky, improve broadband access in mountains | BroadbandPolicy | Scoop.it
Public-private partnership will create 3,000-mile fiber network throughout Kentucky, improve broadband access in mountains
12/23/2014 09:57 PM
by Kevin Wheatley  •  Filed under: From Frankfort
FRANKFORT — Congressman Hal Rogers’ vision of a “silicon holler” in eastern Kentucky came closer to reality Tuesday after officials announced a wide-ranging effort to provide high-speed Internet access throughout the state, with Appalachia getting some early attention.

Rogers, Gov. Steve Beshear and others touted the public-private partnership between Kentucky and Australia-based Macquarie Capital to develop a fiber infrastructure as a godsend for the impoverished mountain region.

“Eastern Kentucky will be equal to the world in limitless technology — no more boundaries sketched by our terrain, no more boundaries for high-tech work,” said Rogers, R-Somerset. “In the past we were limited by rough terrain and a shortage of modern highways. We can truly create a ‘silicon holler’ and compete with the rest of the world because the cable levels those mountains and gives every county worldwide access.”



Eastern Kentucky is a priority in the Next Generation Kentucky Information Highway plan, as officials hope to complete work on a fiber infrastructure “spine” from northern Kentucky to Williamsburg along Interstate 75 by spring 2016.
BroadbandBreakfast's insight:

Significant news on the Gigabit #broadband internet services front in Kentucky!

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Highland: The region’s first gigabit city - St. Louis Business Journal

Highland: The region’s first gigabit city - St. Louis Business Journal | BroadbandPolicy | Scoop.it
In Highland, Illinois, residents dictate how fast they want their Internet to work.
Imagine that for a second. Want faster Internet to stream Netflix all day? Or have a company that relies heavily on teleconferencing? No problem, says Tracey Robinson, a Highland system engineer who works closely with the Highland Communication Services department.
“You name the speed and we’ll get it out there to you,” he said.
Highland is the only true gigabit city in the region, giving its residents and business community a fiber infrastructure that provides Internet speeds that rival those of anywhere else in the country.
“It’s really opened up a world of business for us and for our residents,” Robinson said.
BroadbandBreakfast's insight:

Worth returning to this report about the Gigabit Network in Highland, Illinois.

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Minneapolis residents to get 10-gigabit fiber, for $400 per month

Minneapolis residents to get 10-gigabit fiber, for $400 per month | BroadbandPolicy | Scoop.it
While most parts of the US have to make do with Internet speeds of less than 100Mbps—in many cases much less than 100Mbps—some residents of Minneapolis will soon have access to a ludicrously fast fiber-to-the-home speed tier: 10 gigabits per second.

The service is offered by US Internet, the company that already provides "a couple thousand" Minneapolis residents with 1Gbps service for $65 per month. The 10Gbps service will be available immediately to existing customers willing to pay the $400-per-month fee, though US Internet expects the number of customers who take them up on the deal to be relatively small. All together, US Internet has "a little over 10,000" fiber-to-the-home customers at different speed tiers, all located on the west side of Interstate 35W.

This summer, the company plans to widen its service area to the east side of I-35W, which will encroach further into incumbent Comcast’s territory. According to the Minneapolis Star Tribune, Comcast offers 50Mbps service for $77 and 25Mbps service for $65 in that area; US Internet by contrast prices its 100Mbps service tier—the company’s most popular—at just $45 per month. The gigabit plan at $65 gives customers about 40 times the bandwidth of Comcast’s 25Mbps plan for the same price.
BroadbandBreakfast's insight:

Woo-hoo!

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Net neutrality to dominate D.C.’s tech agenda

Net neutrality to dominate D.C.’s tech agenda | BroadbandPolicy | Scoop.it
For the White House, a major win on net neutrality might come at a cost — scuttling everything else on Washington’s tech and telecom agenda next year. The Federal Communications Commission is racing to write rules that require Internet service providers to treat all Web traffic equally, and many expect the agency will follow President Barack...
BroadbandBreakfast's insight:

It's true that Obama has adopted a "bet the farm" approach to telecom with his Net Neutrality pronouncement....

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President Obama's Ed-Tech Record: Sizing Up Its Impact

President Obama's Ed-Tech Record: Sizing Up Its Impact | BroadbandPolicy | Scoop.it
President Barack Obama touted the benefits of educational technology often last year, but how much influence has he actually had on moving digital learning forward?
BroadbandBreakfast's insight:

Great article from Michelle Davis summarizing the many accomplishments Pres. Obama can take credit for on "Connected Education"

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A Wi-Fi Problem for Hotels?

A Wi-Fi Problem for Hotels? | BroadbandPolicy | Scoop.it
Modern technology has made it possible for people to set up their own personal Wi-Fi networks anywhere they want. Except in the occasional Marriott.

An industry group that includes Marriott International Inc. has petitioned the Federal Communications Commission for guidance on whether hotels are acting within the law when they disable unauthorized Wi-Fi access points set up on their properties.

The hotels say they are trying to make sure their own wireless networks don’t get bogged down and to prevent criminals from tricking people into logging onto fake Wi-Fi networks.

The issue is a flash point for some consumers who believe hotels are trying to force people to use hotel Internet Wi-Fi service—often for a price. And it has broader implications for how convention halls, companies and hospitals manage what has become a must-have communications service.

The airwaves that have been set aside for Wi-Fi aren’t like those used for television broadcasts or cellphone service, which require often expensive licenses to use. Like baby monitors, garage-door openers and cordless phones, Wi-Fi uses unlicensed frequencies that are open to anyone.

Communications law, meanwhile, prohibits people from “willfully or maliciously” interfering with “any radio communications of any station licensed or authorized” by the government. Signal jammers are forbidden by the FCC.

The hotel group says the law against willful interference of communications signals shouldn’t apply to Wi-Fi, because it doesn’t use licensed spectrum. The law also shouldn’t cover interference that results from efforts to “monitor and mitigate threats to the security and reliability of its network,” the hotel group said in an FCC filing in August.
BroadbandBreakfast's insight:

A emerging problem that doesn't need to be - there are ways to share hotel spectrum!

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Comcast-TWC Rips Discovery, Netflix in FCC Merger Comments - TheWrap

Comcast-TWC Rips Discovery, Netflix in FCC Merger Comments - TheWrap | BroadbandPolicy | Scoop.it
Comcast and Time Warner Cable lit into their opponents Tuesday as the two companies defended their $45 billion merger before the FCC.

In a 139-page public portion of their filing to urge the FCC to approve the deal, the companies said they have demonstrated that the transaction “will deliver substantial public interest benefits and generate no cognizable competitive harms.” They suggested the deal’s opponents have offered little more than “rhetoric” and “unsupported conclusions” compared with the companies’ “extraordinarily robust” evidence that the merger is “strongly in the public interest.”

The two companies then named names.

They accused CenturyLink and Dish Network of “blatantly seeking protection from the forces of fair competition that would benefit consumers”; Discovery, RFD-TV, TheBlaze, and Back9 of attempting to command higher fees and terms “they could not reasonably expect in the competitive marketplace”; and Netflix and Cogent of trying to use the review to pursue objectives that had nothing to do with the transaction.
BroadbandBreakfast's insight:

Comcast goes on the offensive, but will it work?

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13 Sundance Film Festival Events You Can Watch Online

13 Sundance Film Festival Events You Can Watch Online | BroadbandPolicy | Scoop.it
This week, about 50,000 attendees will touch down in Park City, Utah, for the annual Sundance Film Festival. If you're unable to make it, you can still participate by watching a number of events streamed live.
BroadbandBreakfast's insight:

A great series of resources about online events streamed from Sundance.

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New app aims to fix broadband puzzle

New app aims to fix broadband puzzle | BroadbandPolicy | Scoop.it
The "last mile"—the connection between fiber-optic cable in the street and broadband-hungry businesses in the buildings nearby—has long been the biggest piece of commercial real estate's digital divide. Now there's an app for that.
Light My Site, developed by telecommunications veteran Kevin Sheehan, aims to make it easier for broadband carriers to connect with potential customers by providing basic information that has traditionally been tough for both sides to get. It will make its formal debut at the New York Tech Meetup Tuesday night, beginning a marketing push that Mr. Sheehan hopes will drive the wide adoption that the service needs to become truly useful.
The free app helps businesses discover what kind of Internet service is available in their buildings (or ones they're moving into), how much it costs and how long installation will take.
"I can find out who's providing service in my building, and if I'm not happy with the offerings I can register with Light My Site" and look for other providers, said Mr. Sheehan, who also serves as the company's chief connectivity officer. His company is located in the office of telecommunications consulting firm BCM One, which helped fund the startup, but operates independently.
Ultimately, once Light My Site has enough users, it will be able to form "collectives" of businesses in a given building and do something no telecommunications consultant can, according to Mr. Sheehan: show carriers that there are now enough potential customers to justify that last-mile investment.
"When a building gets 'critical mass,' my engineering team begins to reach out to the building management and the customers and says, 'We can accommodate your request for 50 or 100 [megabits per second] at this price you said you would be happy to pay. Do you want to move forward?' "
Internet service providers have typically been reluctant to dig up streets or run fiber into buildings if they don't know they'll have enough customers to make the effort profitable. Installation costs start at about $40,000 and can go as high as $200,000.
Those high costs are one reason most buildings outside of midtown and Wall Street are still wired only with outdated copper T1 lines, which provide Internet service that's too slow for popular cloud-based applications.
Light My Site, which had a "soft launch" in November, has signed up 19 broadband providers and—so far—125 users. The company gets a slice of the carriers' revenue from new customers they connect.
"This app has the power to truly be transformative in a socioeconomic way," Mr. Sheehan said. "This app allows people to say, 'I'm in this office in Brooklyn, and my business needs 100 megs, but I can't afford to pay $50,000 to build out, or $5,000 a month, because that's the only way a fiber provider can make money on it.' People can just raise their hand and say, 'I'm here.'
BroadbandBreakfast's insight:

Great app to ensure the breakdown of information asymmetries in the broadband marketplace.

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Silicon Flatirons - Events

Silicon Flatirons - Events | BroadbandPolicy | Scoop.it
Entrepreneurs Unplugged: Lucy Sanders, CEO and Co-founder, National Center for Women & Information Technology (NCWIT)
Wednesday, January 28, 2015; 6:00-7:30 PM, Reception to Follow
@ University of Colorado, ATLAS, Room 100

Kurtz Fargo LLP

Silicon Flatirons, ATLAS, and Kurtz Fargo LLP present Lucy Sanders as our featured entrepreneur with Brad Feld and Jill Dupre as moderators.

Entrepreneurs Unplugged is a meeting place where faculty, students, and community members learn about and get involved in entrepreneurship. In particular, the program offers students, faculty and the Front Range startup community an opportunity to learn how a successful startup is created as well as an opportunity to network. Each Entrepreneurs Unplugged meeting features food, drink and - most importantly - an experienced entrepreneur to discuss his/her start-up experiences.
BroadbandBreakfast's insight:

Event at Silicon Flatirons

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Comcast Has Created Powerful Lobbyist Arsenal to Deal With Hill Antitrust Oversight

SPECIAL REPORT | 24 Dec 2014 | Ref: 1412230038


Comcast hired more lobbying firms in 2014 than it had in any of the previous 15 years, with many hires showcasing a deep understanding of Capitol Hill antitrust oversight. The cable operator has a history of bulking up with antitrust-focused industry lobbyists, often former Hill staffers who have gone through the revolving door from the public sector to the private, whenever an acquisition is pending approval.

BroadbandBreakfast's insight:

Great report from Comm Daily about how communications companies are well-equipped at this Washington game.

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A Journalist’s Guide to Covering CES 2015

A Journalist’s Guide to Covering CES 2015 | BroadbandPolicy | Scoop.it
It’s the beast of all tech conferences, with miles and miles of exhibitors, endless panels and presentations, and every tech brand in the world competing for your attention and coverage. It’s CES 2015, the Consumer Electronics Show being held in Las Vegas from January 6-9, and if you’ve never covered it before, then get on your comfy shoes, and charge up your tech journo skills, because you’re in for a wild few days.
“The energy and momentum of CES is exhilarating..
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Some good information, albeit basic stuff, about #CES2015

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Web Freedom Is Seen as a Growing Global Issue

Web Freedom Is Seen as a Growing Global Issue | BroadbandPolicy | Scoop.it
SAN FRANCISCO — Government censorship of the Internet is a cat-and-mouse game. And despite more aggressive tactics in recent months, the cats have been largely frustrated while the mice wriggle away.

But this year, the challenges for Silicon Valley will mount, with Russia and Turkey in particular trying to tighten controls on foreign-based Internet companies. Major American companies like Facebook, Twitter and Google are increasingly being put in the tricky position of figuring out which laws and orders to comply with around the world — and which to ignore or contest.
BroadbandBreakfast's insight:

There's question that in the realm of press freedom, online is driving the space right now.

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Kentucky awards contract to improve Internet, cell service

Kentucky awards contract to improve Internet, cell service | BroadbandPolicy | Scoop.it
Fiber optic cables will help improve broadband access, cell service in rural Kentucky
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Important news on the Gigabit fiber front from Kentucky!

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46 Connecticut Cities Bond Together For Better Broadband | DSLReports, ISP Information

News: 46 Connecticut Cities Bond Together For Better Broadband
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A brief update on the Connecticut broadband experiment.

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As Comcast merger enters final phase, deal may be on thin ice

As Comcast merger enters final phase, deal may be on thin ice | BroadbandPolicy | Scoop.it
A new skepticism
A shift in sentiment over Comcast’s proposed merger has been reflected in both stock market activity and by the behavior of the deal’s opponents.

Investors’ doubt about the merger’s fate can be seen in the fact that share prices of Comcast and Time Warner Cable are still valued as if the companies are separate entities. As the New York Times noted in November, the adjusted share price of two firms should move toward the same value as the close of the merger approaches — but that is not happening.

Corporate opponents, such as Netflix and smaller telecom firms, have recently ramped up their lobbying game, and launched a new anti-merger campaign.
BroadbandBreakfast's insight:

There are different theories about the Comcast-Time Warner merger proposal, and this puts forward one theory.

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Gigabit Services: Who Has the Inside Track - Google, Telcos, Municipals, or Cable? - Telecompetitor

Gigabit Services: Who Has the Inside Track - Google, Telcos, Municipals, or Cable? - Telecompetitor | BroadbandPolicy | Scoop.it
Pivot Group research shows consumers would prefer to buy gigabit services from incumbent telephone and cable companies, rather than from Google or a municipal
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Answer: municipalities

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Notes from the Sandbox - The Rural Broadband Experiment Auction Results

Notes from the Sandbox - The Rural Broadband Experiment Auction Results | BroadbandPolicy | Scoop.it
We now begin the process of reviewing low bidder applications. We have required the provisionally selected bidders to demonstrate their technical and financial qualifications, as well as obtain a letter of credit and designation as an eligible telecommunications carrier, before they can receive funding. At the same, time, we are starting to design a rural broadband auction on a larger scale. While hard questions remain, we are glad to have results from this experiment to help guide our answers, and we are appreciative of the interest shown by every bidder in the auction.
BroadbandBreakfast's insight:

How will the rural broadband experiments pan out? The jury is still out!

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NTIA Grant Program Ensuring States are Planning for FirstNet

NTIA Grant Program Ensuring States are Planning for FirstNet | BroadbandPolicy | Scoop.it
When Congress called for the creation of a nationwide broadband network for public safety in the Middle Class Tax Relief and Job Creation Act of 2012, lawmakers knew it was important that states play a key role in ensuring that the network meets the needs of local first responders. To implement this goal, the law directed NTIA to establish the State and Local Implementation Grant Program (SLIGP) to support states as they prepare for the launch of the network.

Since awarding grants to 54 states and territories in 2013, NTIA staff has been busy working with our SLIGP grantees on how to make the most of this opportunity. The $116 million in grants are helping states as they conduct outreach with public safety and state and local officials to determine their needs, gaps and priorities for public safety wireless broadband and to prepare for formal consultations with the First Responder Network Authority (FirstNet), which is developing the public safety broadband network.

As we continue to monitor the progress of these efforts, NTIA’s SLIGP federal program officers are conducting site visits to its state grantees. We are gaining valuable information from these visits about how different states are using their grants to plan for FirstNet and have begun sharing some of this information by developing best practices documents.

States are identifying challenges they might face in deploying the nationwide broadband network. They also are making progress on grant priorities such as determining coverage needs and identifying users that will participate on the network, as well as establishing governing bodies to assist the state’s single point of contact for FirstNet.

As of September 2014, recipients across the nation have reached more than 48,000 stakeholders. States have developed a variety of approaches to ensure they are reaching the appropriate stakeholders in their state from developing websites and social media pages to distributing newsletters and email updates. For example, Florida has hosted eight listening sessions around the state and plans to host additional listening tours in 2015. Massachusetts held 10 statewide information sessions and posted the presentations on its website for those who could not attend the meetings in person. Iowa plans to conduct outreach meetings with stakeholders from all the state’s counties, visiting 60 of the state’s 90 counties so far. Missouri’s outreach has included two rounds of meetings with 19 regional Councils of Government, and the state is planning additional meetings as needed.

Looking ahead, NTIA program officers will continue to conduct site visits to offer support, assistance and oversight of our SLIGP awards. We expect grantees to continue their education and outreach to stakeholders within their state as FirstNet continues its efforts to help give first responders a broadband network that will help them save lives.
BroadbandBreakfast's insight:

NTIA continues to push the FirstNet Program

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