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How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses | Wired Business | Wired.com

How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses | Wired Business | Wired.com | Broadband | Scoop.it
Students in Matamoros, Mexico weren't getting much out of school -- until a radical new teaching method unlocked their potential.

Via Nancy White, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
Gail M. Roper's insight:

“THE BOTTOM LINE IS, IF YOU’RE NOT THE ONE CONTROLLING YOUR LEARNING, YOU’RE NOT GOING TO LEARN AS WELL.”

My mom used to say this, she told me that the main thing that kids needed to learn to do was to teach themselves.  She believed that it was a skill that would last them a lifetime.  This article is compelling.  It even elaborates on removing adult barriers. 

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Nancy White's curator insight, October 17, 2013 1:25 PM

Curating is where this begins, informal, unstructured, yet purposeful.

 

Nancy White's curator insight, October 17, 2013 1:27 PM

The more I read about this kind of learning, the more I see blended learning as just a stepping stone.

Nancy White's curator insight, October 17, 2013 1:28 PM

From blended-learning, to personalized learing, to curiosity-fueled learning?

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Google Bookmarks

Google Bookmarks | Broadband | Scoop.it
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WORLD WIDE WEB Google Fiber Gets Portland's OK, But Remains Noncommittal - CIO Today

WORLD WIDE WEB Google Fiber Gets Portland's OK, But Remains Noncommittal
CIO Today
The city council of Portland, Oregon has agreed to let Google enter the city with Fiber.
Gail M. Roper's insight:

Portland moves forward on Google effort.

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Want Google Fiber? Raleigh does too, says this documentary - Triangle Business Journal

Want Google Fiber? Raleigh does too, says this documentary - Triangle Business Journal | Broadband | Scoop.it
Armed with an iPhone camera attachment, Arik Abel sits across from me at the Triangle Business Journal. These days, Abel, founder of fledgling startup Everest Live has one thing on his mind: Google Fiber.
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Google Fiber: Fast, but not free to cities - Charlotte Observer

Google Fiber: Fast, but not free to cities - Charlotte Observer | Broadband | Scoop.it
Google Fiber: Fast, but not free to cities
Charlotte Observer
This is the digital bliss Google is promising up to nine U.S. cities, including Charlotte, with the second wave of its Google Fiber data network.
Gail M. Roper's insight:

Perspectives are always good.  I like the blog post as it shows varying opinions.

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Google Inc (GOOG): Google Fiber Vs. AT&T GigaPower: The Battle For High ... - Seeking Alpha

Google Inc (GOOG): Google Fiber Vs. AT&T GigaPower: The Battle For High ... - Seeking Alpha | Broadband | Scoop.it
Google Inc (GOOG): Google Fiber Vs. AT&T GigaPower: The Battle For High ...
Seeking Alpha
As a resident of Austin, Texas, I have a front row seat to the battle brewing between AT&T (T) and Google (GOOG) in the high-speed broadband market.
Gail M. Roper's insight:

It has been interesting to watch these business models morph.  The one common requirement across the board is right-of-way issues.  After all, most of the policy was written in the early 1900's. 

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Bankrupt Cities, Municipalities List and Map

Bankrupt Cities, Municipalities List and Map | Broadband | Scoop.it
Our map tracks municipal bankruptcy filings throughout the country.
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Paloma Noyola: The Face of Mexico’s Unleashed Potential

Paloma Noyola: The Face of Mexico’s Unleashed Potential | Broadband | Scoop.it

"When a report emerged in September 2012 that a girl from one of Matamoros’ poorest neighborhoods had attained the highest math score in Mexico, some doubted its veracity. It must be fake, they said.

 

But it wasn’t fake. Her name is Paloma Noyola, and what most reports failed to mention is that almost all of her classmates also scored very high on the national math test. 10 scored in 99.99% percentile.

 

Paloma and her classmates also scored in the top percentile in language. Something special was happening at José Urbina López primary school in Matamoros, and Wired went to take a look.

 

The high test scores turned out to be the work of a young teacher who also came from humble beginnings. Sergio Juárez Correa was tired of the monotony of teaching out of a book and wanted to try something new to help engage his students when he came across the work of Sugata Mitra, a UK university professor who had innovated a new pedagogy he called SOLE, or self organized learning environments. The new approach paid off."


Via Community Village, David Mackzum, Ed.D., Bonnie Bracey Sutton
Gail M. Roper's insight:

More on the concept of self teaching.  Young Paloma Noyola has learned to excell learning in a different fashion.  If you have children, read this article.  Talk about a payoff!

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Carlos Batara's comment, October 19, 2013 2:06 PM
This reminds me of Paulo Freire's revoluntionary eductional work in Latin America. Ever read his comments on the "Pedagogy of the Oppressed?" It also reminds how much talent is squandered by the constructs of poverty.
Carlos Batara's curator insight, October 22, 2013 1:53 AM


What does it mean for the world that a young girl from one of the  poorest neighborhoods in Mexico attained the highest math score in her country?.

 

First and foremost, it should remind all of us that wealth has no monopoly on talent and intelligence.  When the more advanced and technologically sophisticated nations fail to lend a helping hand to those with far less resources, they are undermining the most important resource for social, political, and economic growth: human talent.

 

That's simplistic economics 101.

 

So why aren't nations like the U.S. more accomodating to immigrants from poorer nations?  More contemporary, why does the U.S. political leadership want to impose a new immigration system which reduces the chances of those from lower-income brackets to legalize their status here? 

 

In any event, the story about Paloma Noyola and her classmates is a story about something special happening at José Urbina López primary school in Matamoros, Mexico - something which has the potential to change humanity if we heed the lessons.

 

Hopefully, it also induces Democrats and Republicans to rethink their flawed premises about immigrants from poorer regions.

 

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32 Innovations That Will Change Your Tomorrow

32 Innovations That Will Change Your Tomorrow | Broadband | Scoop.it
An abridged guide to the many ways that your day is about to get better.

Via Nancy White, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
Gail M. Roper's insight:

Really interesting and maybe not too far off.

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Nancy White's curator insight, July 12, 2013 5:23 PM

This is an interesting way to look at innovation - rarely are they overnight success stories!

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Overland Park council to discuss Google Fiber at Monday night meeting - Kansas City Star

TechnoBuffalo
Overland Park council to discuss Google Fiber at Monday night meeting
Kansas City Star
“There's no doubt we've had a lot of people inquiring about Google Fiber,” said Overland Park spokesman Sean Reilly.
Gail M. Roper's insight:

It is important to continue to understand the business side of these contracts with the providers whether it be Google or any other provider.  It seems like a moving target.


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NC: Muni Network Debate in Charlotte Observer | community broadband networks

NC: Muni Network Debate in Charlotte Observer | community broadband networks | Broadband | Scoop.it

In a recent op ed in the Charlotte Observer, Christopher Mitchell delves into why North Carolina ranks last in per capita subscribers to a broadband connection. The state, through its legislature, is held hostage by large providers such as Time Warner, CenturyLink, and AT&T. David Hoyle, a retired Senator who admitted pushing bills written by Time Warner Cable, signed his name to an op-ed arguing cities should not have the authority to make their own decisions in this regard.

 

Readers know that Time Warner and CenturyLink (formerly EMBARQ) targeted Wilson's Greenlight, leading to restrictive barriers for any similar initiatives. In his opinion piece, Chris delves into how those providers create an environment that kills opportunity for the people of North Carolina and how local publicly owned networks could restore those opportunities.

 

The Observer edited the original piece for length, but we provide the full version:

 

Click headline to read more--

 


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Gail M. Roper's insight:

The leprechaun-unicorn bill

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Gigabit Squared outlines Seattle fiber prices: 1Gbps for $80 per month

Gigabit Squared outlines Seattle fiber prices: 1Gbps for $80 per month | Broadband | Scoop.it
Ultra-high-speed fiber-to-the-home from Gigabit Squared isn't scheduled to light up Seattle until 2014, but the outfit's just revealed what it aims to (Gigabyte Squared in Seattle offering ultra-high-speed fiber-to-the-home starting in 2014 at $80...
Gail M. Roper's insight:

Read the blogs on this because I think the pricing here might be a bit off.  It's still quite a bit more competitive than what's available in our region.

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3 Ways Government Can Build Trust and Partner With Citizens

3 Ways Government Can Build Trust and Partner With Citizens | Broadband | Scoop.it
In our recent guide entitled, Innovating at the Point of Citizen Engagement: Making Every Moment Count,  I highlighted the activities of Raleigh, North Carol…

Via govdelivery
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Transforming Education in a Gigabit World | Gigabit Nation on BlogTalk Radio

Transforming Education in a Gigabit World | Gigabit Nation on BlogTalk Radio | Broadband | Scoop.it

 

One of broadband's promised benefits is to dramatically change the process of educating children and adults. This broadcast explores how Kansas City can expect the new Google Fiber network to impact learning and knowledge retention while preparing students to live and work in the digital economy.

    

Kansas City, Kansas Public Schools Superintendent Dr. Cynthia Lane joins us to discuss:

 

*  what  KC should expect when local schools tap into a gigabit network;

 

*  how broadband-based education apps alter or enhance teacher-student-parent interaction;

 

*  outcomes when KC schools collaborate via broadband networks with schools nationwide or worldwide; and

 

*  tactics communities can use to prevent a widening digital divide as gigabit networks advance education.

 

As KC and the Fiber to the Home Council begins its conference, "From Gigabit Envy to Gigabit Deployed," education is sure to be a hot topic. This interview with Dr. Lane is broadcasting live from the conference.

 

Click headline to listen to this Gigabit Nation interview--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Gail M. Roper's insight:

Open data and next generation networks, the new platform for successful school systems.  We definitely have to redefine the market place.

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Now You Can Tell The FCC What You Think About Bans On Municipal Broadband - The Consumerist

Now You Can Tell The FCC What You Think About Bans On Municipal Broadband - The Consumerist | Broadband | Scoop.it
Now You Can Tell The FCC What You Think About Bans On Municipal Broadband The Consumerist Last week, a pair of city-operated utility companies petitioned the FCC, daring Commission Chair Tom Wheeler to make good on his promises to overturn...
Gail M. Roper's insight:

Yes, we can.

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Google mulls Wi-Fi offering in KC, Fiber cities - Kansas City Business Journal

Google mulls Wi-Fi offering in KC, Fiber cities - Kansas City Business Journal | Broadband | Scoop.it
Google mulls Wi-Fi offering in KC, Fiber cities
Kansas City Business Journal
Fresh off announcing plans to test a Google Fiber small business product in Kansas City, Google Inc.
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Google Considers Bulking Up On Its Broadband Fiber - Variety

Google Considers Bulking Up On Its Broadband Fiber - Variety | Broadband | Scoop.it
Google Considers Bulking Up On Its Broadband Fiber Variety Google is ready to throw down a few billion bucks on a much bigger fiber buildout: The company said last week that it's in discussions with 34 American cities about the possibility of...
Gail M. Roper's insight:

Estimated cost of rollout to 34 cities stated as $2.2 billion - $3 billion. Article also states Google could reach 40 million homes and serve 20 million broadband customers.  Also, speculates on a $20 billion in annual revenues.  That's a lot of moola!



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Alexandria Councilman Digs into Broadband - Patch.com

Alexandria Councilman Digs into Broadband
Patch.com
Wilson said there are delicate issues surrounding the installation of municipal broadband, including its impact on existing providers.
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AT&T says it can block Google Fiber from poles in Austin; city begs to differ - FierceTelecom

AT&T says it can block Google Fiber from poles in Austin; city begs to differ - FierceTelecom | Broadband | Scoop.it
AT&T says it can block Google Fiber from poles in Austin; city begs to differ
FierceTelecom
AT&T (NYSE: T) owns about 20 percent of the utility poles in Austin, Texas, and says it doesn't have to provide access to Google (Nasdaq: GOOG) Fiber.
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Why Are Girls Not Pursuing Computer Science Degrees? - Edudemic

Why Are Girls Not Pursuing Computer Science Degrees? - Edudemic | Broadband | Scoop.it
Why don't more girls pursue technology careers, become scientists, or become computer scientists? They seem to be self-restraining from computer science degrees and more.

Via Bonnie Bracey Sutton
Gail M. Roper's insight:

I think that part of the reason is the lack of situations for young girls to be exposed to the vast opportunities for careers in technology.  This article also hits home on some of the reasons young girls don't align with the idea of being a technologist.  Little girl reasons . . .  I thin I will use this article in the Digital Connectors curriculum this year.

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How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses | Wired Business | Wired.com

How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses | Wired Business | Wired.com | Broadband | Scoop.it
Students in Matamoros, Mexico weren't getting much out of school -- until a radical new teaching method unlocked their potential.

Via Nancy White, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
Gail M. Roper's insight:

“THE BOTTOM LINE IS, IF YOU’RE NOT THE ONE CONTROLLING YOUR LEARNING, YOU’RE NOT GOING TO LEARN AS WELL.”

My mom used to say this, she told me that the main thing that kids needed to learn to do was to teach themselves.  She believed that it was a skill that would last them a lifetime.  This article is compelling.  It even elaborates on removing adult barriers. 

more...
Nancy White's curator insight, October 17, 2013 1:25 PM

Curating is where this begins, informal, unstructured, yet purposeful.

 

Nancy White's curator insight, October 17, 2013 1:27 PM

The more I read about this kind of learning, the more I see blended learning as just a stepping stone.

Nancy White's curator insight, October 17, 2013 1:28 PM

From blended-learning, to personalized learing, to curiosity-fueled learning?

Rescooped by Gail M. Roper from Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
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Anchor Institutions or a Digital Bridge to Nowhere? | AT&T Public Policy Blog


One of the most important issues that the FCC should examine in considering a proposal to expand its E-rate programs, is the issue of “dark fiber.” Dark fiber refers to fiber optic cable that has not been activated, or “lit,” for use. Some people are saying that the FCC should expand E-rate by expending limited Universal Service Fund (USF) resources on limited-reach networks, i.e., networks that only reach the locations of E-rate customers, and do not provide broadband services to the community at large. But in a world where USF dollars are limited, and any expansion in E-rate could reduce funding available for other universal service objectives, it is critical that the FCC build synergies between its programs. E-rate should not become a digital bridge to nowhere.


Proponents of this plan argue that dark fiber could be a more cost-effective way for schools and libraries to afford high speed broadband service. But policymakers must be careful when analyzing this assumption. Fiber in the ground does not a reliable broadband service make. The Commission proposes to support the cost of electronics to light the fiber, but what about the considerable expertise required to setup and manage the ongoing operation of a sophisticated network? Are schools going to be expected to take on this role? Or will they need to hire consultants? Asking a school to become a telecom provider makes about as much sense as asking a telecom provider to open an elementary school. Our public schools already have the most challenging and important job in the country — educating our children. Does it make public policy sense to add owning and operating networks to that job? The answer cannot possibly be yes.


Even if a school is capable of building and operating a high-capacity network with dark fiber, in many cases it would do so at the cost of the community at large. If private fiber networks are deployed only to serve certain select locations, those schools and libraries will not serve as “anchor institutions” – in which the benefits of broadband are spread to the larger community – on widely deployed networks. Instead, they will risk becoming islands of connectivity in a sea of inadequate broadband.  Allowing that to happen would conflict with the national Universal Service Fund imperative to get high speed broadband service to all Americans in all parts of the country.


Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Gail M. Roper's insight:

I agree with about 85% of the logic here.  USF does need to be overhauled and wires without purpose bring no value to the community.  Maybe some partnerships to fund organizations that promote digital education, government apps., and open access initiaties with USF  is the answer.  What do you think?  One thing we know that the current USF model has been broken for years.

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Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc's curator insight, October 18, 2013 4:36 PM

While keeping in mind the source of these comments regarding E-Rate, AT&T does raise an issue that every community that recieved BTOP or will receive E-Rate grants for the buildout of middle mile networks.   What is that issue?  How do you build out from these Community Anchor Institions to the Last Mile?  How do we fund the lateral network connections to homes and businesses? This will take us through the next three to five years to acheive. Now is the time be launch this process.

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Interview with founder and CEO Scott Burns of GovDelivery on GMSP Business

In 2000, GovDelivery partnered with local Minnesota governments to develop GovDelivery Digital Communication Management (DCM), a solution that originally foc...
 

 


Via govdelivery
Gail M. Roper's insight:

Very good article with GovDelivery CEO Scott Burns.  Raleigh uses GovDelivery as a tool to serve our constituents.  I actually use it myself to keep me from having to read information that I don't need.  As you can see Burns understands that we have to find better ways to serve up the information that we have as a government.  Another form of open data!

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govdelivery's curator insight, August 14, 2013 1:57 PM

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Google Fiber leads to technology hotbed in Kansas City | The Collegian

Google Fiber leads to technology hotbed in Kansas City | The Collegian | Broadband | Scoop.it
What's going on KC? Google Fiber leads to technology hotbed in Kansas City - K-State Collegian http://t.co/OahAFWU2pT
Gail M. Roper's insight:

This begins to outline the economic development impact of the high speed fiber network.

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3 Ways Peer-to-Peer Services Will Rock Government’s World | Reach The Public

3 Ways Peer-to-Peer Services Will Rock Government’s World | Reach The Public | Broadband | Scoop.it
A blog about government-to-citizen digital communication and engagement, Government 2.0, GovDelivery, and other e-government issues

Via govdelivery
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This is an excellent model to consider.

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GOVERNOR PATRICK COMMEMORATES OPENING OF NEW BROADBAND NETWORK FOR CAPE & ISLANDS | Mass.gov

GOVERNOR PATRICK COMMEMORATES OPENING OF NEW BROADBAND NETWORK FOR CAPE & ISLANDS | Mass.gov | Broadband | Scoop.it

Governor Deval Patrick today joined community leaders and public officials at the Massachusetts Maritime Academy to mark the beginning of operations on the new OpenCape fiber-optic broadband network. The Cape and Islands will now have a 300-mile open-access fiber-optic network connecting over 70 important community facilities, including community colleges, high schools, libraries, public safety facilities and other municipal buildings.

 

“Broadband is essential for Massachusetts to remain competitive,” said Governor Patrick. “OpenCape is a remarkable milestone that will connect thousands of residents and small businesses to education and economic opportunities all over the world.”

 

The Patrick Administration has been a longtime champion for broadband expansion to enable residents and businesses to better compete in the 21st century global economy. In April 2013, Governor Patrick lit the first section of MassBroadband 123, a new 1,200-mile fiber-optic network that will bring high-speed Internet access to underserved areas of western and central Massachusetts. Broadband expansion is a critical component of Governor Patrick's strategy to invest in education, innovation and infrastructure in order to drive growth and economic opportunity in every corner of the Commonwealth.

 

“This broadband infrastructure is a tremendous asset for our communities, and it will connect our schools, libraries, hospitals and businesses,” said Senate President Therese Murray. “With the completion of this project, the Cape will finally have open access to a reliable communications network like the rest of the state.”

 

“It remains essential to invest in tools we can not only use today, but build upon for tomorrow,” said Senator Dan Wolf. “The OpenCape network does just this, and I look forward to seeing the positive impact it will have in our Cape community, notably our schools and libraries.”

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Crowdfunding for Broadband Gathers Steam. Get on the Train! | Gigabit Nation on BlogTalk Radio

Crowdfunding for Broadband Gathers Steam. Get on the Train! | Gigabit Nation on BlogTalk Radio | Broadband | Scoop.it

 

Blacksburg, VA raised $91,000 to build a 1 gig network downtown using crowdfunding (bit.ly/ZVsVIz). A Kansas City neighborhood crowdfunded a wireless network buildout. Have we found the key to unlocking a big increase in broadband networks?

 

As interest in this tactic builds, two community broadband veterans are rolling out a Web tool to crowdfund, aggregate demand and coordinate stakeholders. The design of this service reflects a belief that funding is just one of the challenges communities must address.

 

Crowdfiber co-founders Greg Richardson and Bailey White advocate an integrated approach to broadband deployment that builds a pre-launch subscriber base while simultaneously raising money to fund the network. In addition, communities must be adept at organizing and project management.

 

Listeners come away from this interview with a better understanding of:

 

* crowdfunding best practices;
* using the Google “fiberhoods” tactic to map demand; and
* organizing stakeholders (a.k.a. herding cats).

 

Click headline to listen to this Gigabit Nation interview--

 


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Gail M. Roper's insight:

Craig might be on to something.  Crowd funding platform specifically for community broadband.  It's worth a listen. 

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Bruno SCHNEIDER LE SAOUT's curator insight, June 9, 2013 5:18 AM

Digital transformation at work ;)

Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, June 9, 2013 6:57 AM

This is very interesting, another way Crowdfunding is being creatively used. Even if you don't want to listen to the whole interview, just read what they came up with: crowdfunding broadband networks!


Fund your Business with a Free Business Plan Template: http://www.business-funding-insider.com/free-business-plan-template.html