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Educational technology , Erate, Broadband and Connectivity
As we progress toward a deeply digital world of connectivity the issue of broadband deployment and projects is very important
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iPad Apps for Dyslexia/Reading Writing Support

iPad Apps for Dyslexia/Reading Writing Support | Educational technology , Erate, Broadband and Connectivity | Scoop.it
Staff at CALL Scotland have produced a helpful Wheel of Apps guide for iPad that may be useful for students with dyslexia or who just need some additional support with reading and/or writing diffic...

Via Kathleen McClaskey, Linda Taber Ullah
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Pippa Davies @PippaDavies 's curator insight, April 1, 12:40 PM

iPad Apps for students with Dyslexia.

Heidi Hutchison's curator insight, April 27, 7:44 AM

Great resources!

Erin Schettler's curator insight, August 14, 6:47 AM

This is an AMAZING compilation of apps to aid struggling readers!

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How Students Can Create Animated Movies to Teach Each Other

How Students Can Create Animated Movies to Teach Each Other | Educational technology , Erate, Broadband and Connectivity | Scoop.it
In addition to learning our content and curriculum standards, today's students also need to be able to do the following effectively: collaborate with one another, synthesize ideas, create content, ...

Via Beth Dichter, Gianfranco D'Aversa
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, January 17, 5:35 AM

Have you seen an RSA Animate video? Are you interested in learning how to make one or better yet, have your students make one? This post provides an in-depth look at how to go about have your students create an animated video that provides them with the opportunity to  practice 21st century skills (quoted from post below):

* collaborate with one another

* synthesize ideas

* create content

* communicate ideas clearly

* use technology

This activity is designed to have your students create content, providing you with materials to use in future classes as well as helping your current students understand the materiial.

The author, Jordan Collier, provides a detailed five-day plan. Day 1 would have you dividing students into groups of three, assign them a section of a chapter in a textbook, and determine the key facts that need to be taught. To read about how to assist them with this and the tasks for Day 2 - 5 click through to the post.

María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, January 18, 7:46 AM

Great one

Eduardo Wegman's curator insight, January 19, 10:29 AM

Collaboration is the key for future society development

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Your Brain on Books: 10 Things That Happen to Our Minds When We Read - OEDB.org

Your Brain on Books: 10 Things That Happen to Our Minds When We Read - OEDB.org | Educational technology , Erate, Broadband and Connectivity | Scoop.it
Click above to view full image! Any book lover can tell you: diving into a great novel is an immersive experience that can make your brain come alive with imagery and emotions and even turn on your senses.

Via Anu Ojaranta, Pamela D Lloyd
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sarah's curator insight, October 27, 2013 7:08 AM

intéressant

Pamela D Lloyd's curator insight, October 27, 2013 4:07 PM

Educators have long told us that reading expands our minds. Here are some of the specific ways in which they do so.

Carol Rine's curator insight, October 29, 2013 7:54 AM

This is a GREAT article that has lots of embedded cross-linked articles within it.  :O)

 

Carol

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Are E-Books Killing Reading For Fun?

Are E-Books Killing Reading For Fun? | Educational technology , Erate, Broadband and Connectivity | Scoop.it
Americans are reading differently than they used to.

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, January 25, 9:57 AM

25 January 2014

 

Generally speaking NPR is one of my "GO TO" resources for reliable  information about "anything." So when I saw this headline in my daily search for scoopable online content, I was intrigued. 

 

Though the PEW Research Center report referenced is a pretty serious and deep and somewhat encouraging report  (see: http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2014/E-Reading-Update/Overview.aspx) this six-minute audio seemed to cover the surface, but "failed to support the headline." It did not focus upon the implication of the headline that E-Books ARE killing reading for fun.

 

Actually, I'm trying to be a bit snarky here. The audio is worth listening to. It's the headline that bothers me. We all know that we often scan headlines looking for intriguing articles to read. Some do not create enough traction for us to consider reading, others get us to start but not finish reading, and still others get us to the article that is so intriguing that we read with attentive interest to the end.

 

This morning in my scan for articles, my eye was caught by several headlines and I began to wonder about headlines themselves.

 

A few examples, you can Google them all if any of the tiltes intrigue you...

 

BUT BEFORE you start Googling the titles, Try this.

1. Read the entire list of titles FIRST

2. Being mindful of your own initial reaction to the titles, review the titles and decide which you believe

 - will be articles promoting reading and which will be critical of reading.

 - which will support opinions you already hold and which will challenge your existing opinions

- which you will actually consider Googling so you can read them and which don't even create sufficient curiousity to read

- and finally (rhetorically) which will implant some sense that there really is evidence to support your opinions that you won't read but sub-consciously incorporate as proof that your opinion is justified by some authoritative expertise.

 

THEN read as you wish and when finished, which headlines planted biased opinions that might be dangerous if the article is not read at all or not read attentively. (Was the article WHETHER YOU AGREED WITH IT OR NOT reliant upon cherry-picking the evidence it relied upon for its conclusions? Did the article adequately address any counter-evidence WHETHER YOU AGREED WITH IT OR NOT?)

 

Well, as are all of my "commentary assignments" you may consider them only rhetorical. But, here's the list...

 

 

"Most American adults read a print book in the past year, even as e-reading continues to grow"

"Kids Aren't reading On Tablets"

"The Top 10 Books on Apple's iBooks"

 

"Book-crazy boy, 5, a budding literary critic"

 

"A brief guide to faking your way through literary classics when you haven't actually read them"

"Getting Rid of Books, Making Space for Life"

"Reading Books Is Fundamental"

 

"9 Video Games Based On Classic Literature"

 

"BEHIND TWO GOOD MOVIES, TWO GREAT BOOKS"

 

"CODE IS NOT LITERATURE"

 

"Why It's Important to Keep Reading Books By People Even If They're Monsters"

 

"Is American literature 'massively overrated"?

 

"Fla. Board of Ed weighs changes to Common Core"

 

"5 Questions To Evaluate Curriculum For Rigor"

 

"Holding Teachers Accountable For Decisions They Aren't Allowed to Make"

 

"The Peculiar Underworld of Rare-Book Thieves"

 

 

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

by GLT GLobal ED (dba Google Lit Trips) a 501c3 tax-exempt educational non profit encouraging learners to "READ THE WOR(L)D"

 

 

 

 

 

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The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens: Scientific American

The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens: Scientific American | Educational technology , Erate, Broadband and Connectivity | Scoop.it
E-readers and tablets are becoming more popular as such technologies improve, but research suggests that reading on paper still boasts unique advantages

Via Pamela D Lloyd
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Pamela D Lloyd's curator insight, December 9, 2013 3:26 AM

It's still early days for digital reading, so it's unclear how many of the issues noted in this examination of the differences between reading physical books and ebooks will remain, and how many will seem hopelessly antiquated to our descendents. I found that most of the points noted reflect my own experience with our evolving media delivery systems, while also suggesting some thought-provoking possibilities for the future.