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-stan by your land

Central Asia is full of lands whose names end in -stan. A certain powerful North American country has a related name. How? It's not your standard explanation...

Via Seth Dixon
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Tyler Anson's curator insight, February 23, 10:37 AM

This video is cool because it shows the diffusion of name from one of the original languages of the world. It goes to show how all these countries in Asia end in -stan just because of what it means (loosely translates to "land"). This video shows the diffusion of language over time.

Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 2, 11:37 PM

"Stan" is the persian term for "country." Also, it's a term for where people live as these countries are named after Kazaks, Uzbeks, Turkmens, Kyrgyz, Tajiks, Afghans and Pakis. Also, Iran has 5 different provinces that end in the term "stan" plus the many other regions around central. However, I don't understand why Iran wouldn't call itself "Iranistan." To sum it up, these 7 countries that end in the term "stan" are part of the persian empire and these countries' names were originated by persians.

Danielle Lip's curator insight, March 4, 10:31 PM

When I was watching this video I learned a lot about -stan, how central asia has many lands that end in -stan. The ending -stan can relate to many things such as a stallion, steed, stable , stay  and stay and other things that helps the viewer and audience relate to their world and things around them.  I found out that Pakistan is named " land of the pure."

The united States is also a -stan as told in this video, starting with the Great Plains area. The stans actually abounded under the rule of the Russians and the Soviets.

This is an interesting video that I believe people should watch because you learn a lot about Central Asia as well as how North America relates because of -stan.

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Geography Education
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The Geography of Language

"Over the course of human history, thousands of languages have developed from what was once a much smaller number. How did we end up with so many? And how do we keep track of them all? Alex Gendler explains how linguists group languages into language families, demonstrating how these linguistic trees give us crucial insights into the past."


Via Seth Dixon
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Woodstock School's curator insight, June 4, 2014 6:05 AM

A good teaching tool for explaining the diversity of languages.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 12, 2014 9:38 PM

Geografia Cultural

Chris Plummer's curator insight, January 11, 11:46 PM

Summary- This video explains how so many languages came to be and why. By the early existence of human there was a such smaller variety of languages. Tribes that spoke one language would often split in search of new recourses. Searching tribe would develop in many new different ways than the original tribe. new foods, land, and other elements created a radically different language than the original. 

 

Insight- In unit 3 we study language as a big element of out chapter. One key question in chapter 6 was why are languages distributed the way they are. It is obvious from the video that languages are distributed they way they are is because of the breaking up from people which forced people to develop differently thus creating a different language. As this process continues, there become more and more branches of a language family.  

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17th century London visualized

"Six students from De Montfort University have created a stellar 3D representation of 17th century London, as it existed before The Great Fire of 1666. The three-minute video provides a realistic animation of Tudor London, and particularly a section called Pudding Lane where the fire started. As Londonist notes, “Although most of the buildings are conjectural, the students used a realistic street pattern [taken from historical maps] and even included the hanging signs of genuine inns and businesses” mentioned in diaries from the period."


Via Seth Dixon
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's insight:

Awesome... great to use with literature, and the arrs and sciences.

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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 8, 2013 2:53 AM

London in the 1700's was a chacterised by buildings that were very tighly packed together with obviously little fire code. There buildings are similiar to other communities thrughout Europe and areas in Switzerland. This remake of the past gives the student an animated journey into an  England that once was before the fire. It appears preindustrial revolution and shows how the economy was run by individual businesses and markets, its always interesting to look into the past and see the way the same cities exist today. Most importantly we learn and have the best fire codes possible

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 11:24 AM

For someone who loves history as much as i do this was a real treat. It honest makes you feel as if you could hop on a plane and travel there right now. Also as someone who has walked the streets of london you can see glimpses of these times within the architechture and the city planning. Great video really makes me nostalgic for a time in which was way before myself.

Mrs. Karnowski-Simul's curator insight, August 27, 2014 6:41 AM

2G Contemporary Period

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The Map That Lincoln Used to See the Reach of Slavery

The Map That Lincoln Used to See the Reach of Slavery | Educational technology , Erate, Broadband and Connectivity | Scoop.it

"Historian Susan Schulten writes in her book Mapping the Nation: History and Cartography in Nineteenth-Century America that during the 1850s many abolitionists used maps to show slavery's historical development and to illustrate political divisions within the South. (You can see many of those maps on the book’s companion website.)  Schulten writes that President Lincoln referred to this particular map often, using it to understand how the progress of emancipation might affect Union troops on the ground. The map (hi-res) even appears in the familiar Francis Bicknell Carpenter portrait First Reading of the Emancipation Proclamation of President Lincoln, visible leaning against a wall in the lower right-hand corner of the room."

 

Tags: mapping, historical, cartography.


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Anna & Lexi 's curator insight, October 3, 2013 11:18 AM

I chose this scoop because it relates to slavery, and slavery has something to do with economics. It also has to do with social. This map was used by Lincoln to see the reach of slavery. TOPIC: social

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 4:13 AM

Great historical map of the population density of enslaved people during the 1850s. I would like to see this map with a side by side of the poulation density of modern day african americans. I think they would be very similar due to many people not wanting to leave their culture and tradtion behind. Another little thing i found interesting on this map is where the slaves were the most populated such as along the mississippi and coastal carolinas. This is from the farms having to use massive amounts of water to run and whats better than being right on the water.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:01 AM

This made, created in 1861, shows the relevant amounts of slavery occurring throughout that year. The map shades counties based on the percentage of total inhabitants who were enslaved. Though this map was simple, it showed the relationship between states commitments to slavery and their enthusiasm about secession, making a visual argument about Confederate motivations. President Lincoln referred to this particular map often, using it to understand how the progress of emancipation might affect Union troops on the ground. The map is a great representation of slavery that amounted during the 1860's.

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from U.S HISTORY SHACK : MIKE BUSARELLO
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The Silk Road: Connecting the ancient world through trade

"With modern technology, a global exchange of goods and ideas can happen at the click of a button. But what about 2,000 years ago? Shannon Harris Castelo unfolds the history of the 5,000-mile Silk Road, a network of multiple routes that used the common language of commerce to connect the world's major settlements, thread by thread."


Via Seth Dixon, Mary Rack, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 4, 2014 10:02 PM

This TED-ED lesson was produced in part by an AP Human Geography teacher and the strands of geographic thought in this video are evident.  More geographers should make their own TED ED lessons; thanks for blazing the trail Shannon! 


Tags: TED, worldwide, transportation, globalization, diffusion, historical, and video.

Amanda Morgan's comment, September 13, 2014 5:09 PM
Great video! Very cool to see how far the world has come in regards to globalization. Technology has allowed the people across the globe to immerse themselves in other cultures and good from other parts of the world.
Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 10:51 AM

Great video! Very cool to see how far the world has come in regards to globalization. Technology has allowed the people across the globe to immerse themselves in other cultures and good from other parts of the world.

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
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The Real Pirates of the Caribbean | ESRI.com

The Real Pirates of the Caribbean | ESRI.com | Educational technology , Erate, Broadband and Connectivity | Scoop.it
Explore the travels and exploits of five real pirates of the Caribbean. Click through the tabs to track the adventures of each pirate overlaid on Spanish ports and pirate strongholds in the area. Zoom into the map to see additional detail. Click headline to access the interactive maps--
Via Seth Dixon, Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Lena Minassian's curator insight, February 4, 7:04 PM

This map was fun to explore because if its interactive nature. It shows the travels of the five actual pirates of the Caribbean in the colonial-era. It describes each pirate and what they were known for. You were able to actually follow their routes and click on all the ports and learn about why they were important. Every pirate has a legend that you can click on to help guide you through the story map. This map even went further to show where there was a treasure fleet or a Spanish mine. Fun way to look at this!

Louis Mazza's curator insight, February 5, 1:37 PM

This is an interactive map that takes you along the routes of the real pirates of the Caribbean. These pirates sailed mainly along the Atlantic coast of the America's with some venturing further eastward. this maps shares the story of 5 famous pirates. Some pirates like William Parker, an Englishman made their living robbing Spanish treasure fleets.  other pirates like Blackbeard, known for his imposing size and black beard relied more on his reputation that continuous acts to strike fear into others. when Blackbeard pulled up, give up the treasure, HAHA. others like Henry Morgan went on to bigger things, Morgan became a lieutenant governor of Jamaica.

lieutenant governor of Jamaica.lieutenant governor of Jamaica.lieutenant governor of Jamaica.
Jared Medeiros's curator insight, February 11, 10:00 PM

This pirate excursion map is so cool and gives a great look at the travels of different pirates.  As we get farther away from these time periods, it seems like the idea of these Caribbean pirates are fictional.  To hear true historical events about these individual pirates is very interesting.  I would  love to take a time machine back to Port Royal during these times to experience that madness.

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Salem Witch Trials Podcast

Salem Witch Trials Podcast | Educational technology , Erate, Broadband and Connectivity | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 19, 2013 3:02 PM

With Halloween right around the corner, the Salem Witch trials loom large in the collective American psyche.  While many emphasize the supernatural and the scandalous, this Maps 101 podcast (based on the article written by Julie Dixon and yours truly) gives the geographic and historic context to understand the tragedy of the 1692 witch trials.


Tags: seasonal, historical, colonialism.

Mohamed Maktoub's curator insight, October 21, 2013 6:20 AM

لوحة  عظيمة  مثل صاحبها 

Justin McCullough's curator insight, October 21, 2013 1:37 PM

The outbreak of the Salem Witch Trials really are really something that produces many questions. Perhaps the most obvious question is why did these trials happen all of a sudden? A community largely based off of agriculture produces an atmosphere of superstition. This can be seen in the events that led up to the Salem witch trials. With the land barely producing enough to sustain the town, people look for a scapegoat to blame. Neighbors turned on neighbors in order to obtain more land claiming that each other were witches. It is interesting to see that in a time of crisis one can a helping hand is not always the popular choice; as seen in the Salem Witch Trials the opposite extreme is taken place.