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Educational technology , Erate, Broadband and Connectivity
As we progress toward a deeply digital world of connectivity the issue of broadband deployment and projects is very important
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10 Steps To CyberSecurity | Infographic [pdf]

 

Learn more:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2012/07/11/cyberhygiene-hygiene-for-ict-in-education-and-business/

 


Via Gust MEES, Suvi Salo
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Microsoft Security Intelligence Report-January to June 2013

Microsoft Security Intelligence Report-January to June 2013 | Educational technology , Erate, Broadband and Connectivity | Scoop.it

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Gust MEES's curator insight, December 26, 2013 12:18 PM

 

Check it to find out where your country is behaving on Cyber-Security in the world!!!

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Teach Kids To Be Their Own Internet Filters

Teach Kids To Be Their Own Internet Filters | Educational technology , Erate, Broadband and Connectivity | Scoop.it
Students live in an information saturated world. The most effective way to keep them safe and using the internet responsibly as a learning tool is to teach them how to be their own filters.

Via Gust MEES, Ellen Barnhizer, Agron S. Dida
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Say Keng Lee's curator insight, October 7, 2013 3:12 AM

Useful for the adult pros as well, especially the evaluation criteria suggested...

Philip Verghese 'Ariel's curator insight, October 7, 2013 9:45 AM

Yes, Gust, let them felter themselves, and ha, let us guide them. Thanks for the share Gust.

Eileen Forsyth's curator insight, January 17, 2014 12:28 PM

SAGE ADVICE on how to teach kids to filter themselves (digitally)

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Cyber-Security Practice: Learn it in one week

Cyber-Security Practice: Learn it in one week | Educational technology , Erate, Broadband and Connectivity | Scoop.it
. . Read, think, learn and share over Social Media… Security is everyone's responsibility! We are ALL responsible for the Internet's future! . ===> "Nothing in life is to be feared. It is only t...

 


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How Attackers Can Use Radio Signals and Mobile Phones to Steal Protected Data | Cyberespionage

How Attackers Can Use Radio Signals and Mobile Phones to Steal Protected Data | Cyberespionage | Educational technology , Erate, Broadband and Connectivity | Scoop.it
Dubbed “AirHopper” by the researchers at Cyber Security Labs at Ben Gurion University, the proof-of-concept technique allows hackers and spies to surreptitiously siphon passwords and other data from an infected computer using radio signals generated and transmitted by the computer and received by a mobile phone. The research was conducted by Mordechai Guri, Gabi Kedma, Assaf Kachlon, and overseen by their advisor Yuval Elovici.

The attack borrows in part from previous research showing how radio signals (.pdf) can be generated by a computer’s video card (.pdf). The researchers in Israel have developed malware that exploits this vulnerability by generating radio signals that can transmit modulated data that is then received and decoded by the FM radio receiver built into mobile phones. FM receivers come installed in many mobile phones as an emergency backup, in part, for receiving radio transmissions when the internet and cell networks are down. Using this function, however, attackers can turn a ubiquitous and seemingly innocuous device into an ingenious spy tool. Though a company or agency may think it has protected its air-gapped network by detaching it from the outside world, the mobile phones on employee desktops and in their pockets still provide attackers with a vector to reach classified and other sensitive data.

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Gust MEES's curator insight, November 9, 2014 8:53 AM

Dubbed “AirHopper” by the researchers at Cyber Security Labs at Ben Gurion University, the proof-of-concept technique allows hackers and spies to surreptitiously siphon passwords and other data from an infected computer using radio signals generated and transmitted by the computer and received by a mobile phone. The research was conducted by Mordechai Guri, Gabi Kedma, Assaf Kachlon, and overseen by their advisor Yuval Elovici.

The attack borrows in part from previous research showing how radio signals(.pdf) can be generated by a computer’s video card (.pdf). The researchers in Israel have developed malware that exploits this vulnerability by generating radio signals that can transmit modulated data that is then received and decoded by the FM radio receiver built into mobile phones. FM receivers come installed in many mobile phones as an emergency backup, in part, for receiving radio transmissions when the internet and cell networks are down. Using this function, however, attackers can turn a ubiquitous and seemingly innocuous device into an ingenious spy tool. Though a company or agency may think it has protected its air-gapped network by detaching it from the outside world, the mobile phones on employee desktops and in their pockets still provide attackers with a vector to reach classified and other sensitive data.

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What is Malware? -Part two

What is Malware? -Part two | Educational technology , Erate, Broadband and Connectivity | Scoop.it

You turn on your computer and a message appears to tell you to update your Adobe Reader or iTunes or any software you have installed on your computer. You can’t be bothered right now, so click the option to remind you later – it’s a habit with these irritating messages, right? Then you have just opened yourself up to cybercriminals the world over.

 

Congratulations!

 

No piece of software is perfect or can ever be perfect. These imperfections within the code can be exploited by hackers to gain access to your computer. Once an exploit is found, it is patched by the software company which then sends an update to its users. This is the update that you keep ignoring. Until you take the time to click ‘Update’, you are vulnerable to attack. Your apathy is what the hackers are counting on.

 


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WordPress › AntiVirus « WordPress Plugins

WordPress › AntiVirus « WordPress Plugins | Educational technology , Erate, Broadband and Connectivity | Scoop.it

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Gust MEES's curator insight, November 2, 2013 8:00 PM

 

WordPress › AntiVirus « WordPress Plugins

 

Learn more:

 

http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/06/23/ict-awareness-what-you-should-know/

 

Training in Business's curator insight, November 7, 2013 1:37 PM

WordPress › AntiVirus « WordPress Plugins

 

Techstore's curator insight, November 7, 2013 1:50 PM

WordPress › AntiVirus « WordPress Plugins