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Broad Canvas
Glocal Issues: problems and solutions
Curated by David Hulme
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Oldest and Youngest Populations

Oldest and Youngest Populations | Broad Canvas | Scoop.it

"There are 1.2 billion people between the ages of 15 and 24 in the world today — and that means that many countries have populations younger than ever before.  Some believe that this 'youth bulge' helps fuel social unrest — particularly when combined with high levels of youth unemployment.  Youth unemployment is a 'global time bomb,' as long as today’s millennials remain 'hampered by weak economies, discrimination, and inequality of opportunity.'  The world’s 15 youngest countries are all in Africa.  Of the continent’s 200 million young people, about 75 million are unemployed.

On the flip side, an aging population presents a different set of problems: Japan and Germany are tied for the world’s oldest countries, with median ages of 46.1. Germany’s declining birth rate might mean that its population will decrease by 19 percent, shrinking to 66 million by 2060. An aging population has a huge economic impact: in Germany, it has meant a labor shortage, leaving jobs unfilled."


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Max Minard's curator insight, March 22, 9:04 PM

This map shows the average age for every country based on its own individual population. It even provides the oldest and youngest countries with Niger being the youngest country on average and Germany and Japan tied for the oldest country on average. certain patterns can be seen on the map such as the green areas (teens as median age) being mainly centered is almost all of Africa. The other areas are in the twenties. Based on this information, one can safely assume that the average global ages correlates with the relative development of each country and it s success in domestic health care. Having this allows for their population to have a larger life expectancy and therefore a higher average age based on its overall population. 

Kristen Trammell's curator insight, March 23, 12:05 PM

I. Using the data from CIA Facebook, global post created a map illustrating the median ages of countries around the world. The world’s fifteen youngest countries are all located in Africa. The high number of teenagers in developed countries leads to youth unemployment which leads to the countries being “hampered by weak economies.” 

 

II. The distribution of ages effects countries by “weak economies, discrimination, and inequality of opportunity.” Although countries with a fixed population of a young age can be detrimental, a country with an aging population can lead to a declining birth rate. This leads to labor shortages in the future which additionally stifles the economy.  

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 23, 7:08 PM

Demographics seemingly started with age as a metric many years ago and have evolved into marketing tools, political footballs, and ways to combat everything from obesity to social security. Africa is clearly the youngest and probably for a very morbid reason; AIDS and Ebola among other diseases have taken their toll on the sexually active and thus have reduced the average age of their population.

Germany seems to be the place to go for a job as the labor shortage will mean higher wages for the folks who are left. Japan has another issue; a healthy aging population that will strain the government's ability to financially take care of them.

I wonder if the unevenness of Europe is an indication of the two World wars that were fought mostly on the turf. Did some countries lose more than others? If more soldiers, presumably of baby making age, perished did this affect the countries ability to keep pace with the Germany's and Spain's of Europe?

Diet seems to play a large part as well as the Mediterranean is well represented in terms of age. Does their healthy diet of fish, nuts, legumes and olive oil make a difference?

I could spend all day postulating, but I'll leave some of the findings for you to discover...

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Canada's population of seniors hits record high

OTTAWA, May 29 - Canada's population of senior citizens hit a record high in 2011 as the oldest of the baby boomer generation entered retirement.
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Royal Society Calls for Redistribution of Wealth and More Birth Control to Save Planet

Royal Society Calls for Redistribution of Wealth and More Birth Control to Save Planet | Broad Canvas | Scoop.it

"The Royal Society wants the world to do something about population growth in a bid to stave off environmental and economic calamity, according to a new report dubbed “People and the Planet” released on April 26. At the same time, the excessive consumption of the world’s richest billion people must be restrained so that pets in the U.S. don’t consume more resources than people in Bangladesh." (Source: Scientific American blog )

 

A new report by the UK's Royal Society states some inconvenient truths and gets storm of critique from growth fundamentalists.


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Book Review: Is the Planet Full? edited by Ian Goldin

Book Review: Is the Planet Full? edited by Ian Goldin | Broad Canvas | Scoop.it

"Ultimately, Is the Planet Full? argues that the world we live in may already be overpopulated due to our current institutional arrangements failing to adequately manage resources in an equitable and sustainable way. Goldin and colleagues highlight that counter to popular opinion “the planet may be far from full” (p.228), but only if we address key governance challenges in managing our societies, economies and environment."


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Willy De Backer's curator insight, August 11, 2014 3:25 AM

Good review on a new interesting book about population growth.

degrowth economy and ecology's comment, August 11, 2014 5:13 AM
Full of stupids and idiots
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Canada prepares for an Asian future

Canada prepares for an Asian future | Broad Canvas | Scoop.it
For generations, Asian immigrants to Canada suffered discrimination. Now, the country's Chinese population may bring the country new opportunities.
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