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Broad Canvas
Glocal Issues: problems and solutions
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The Really, Really Big Picture

The Really, Really Big Picture | Broad Canvas | Scoop.it

"Steadily rising energy costs and decreasing net energy yields will simply not be able to fund the future economic growth and consumptive lifestyles that developed nations are depending on (and that developing nations are aspiring to). In fact, the persistent global economic weakness we've been experiencing over the past years is an expected symptom of the throttling constraint decreasing net energy places on growth."


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Willy De Backer's curator insight, January 18, 2013 2:31 AM

Chris Martenson's excellent analysis of why there is not going to be enough net energy for the economic growth we want.

Stephane Bilodeau's curator insight, January 18, 2013 7:03 AM

"There has been a very strong and concerted public-relations effort to spin the recent shale energy plays of the U.S. as complete game-changers for the world energy outlook.  These efforts do not square up well with the data and are creating a vast misperception about the current risks and future opportunities among the general populace and energy organizations alike.  The world remains quite hopelessly addicted to petroleum, and the future will be shaped by scarcity – not abundance, as some have claimed.

 

If you care about the future of the economy, your standard of living (or that of your children), and/or your quality of life, you need to fully understand this relationship between growth and net energy. Your individual future (and our collective one) depends on it."

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"Neither a borrower nor a lender be"

"The EMU will eventually (that is, within the next few months) either have to endure a monumentally costly break-up, or forge a tighter fiscal union with “debt-pooling,” joint budgets and tax systems, and guarantees against default. The domestic political resistance to the latter would be prohibitive in several nations—and even a single country might be able to torpedo collective efforts to centralize and shore up the euro system. It’s just remotely possible that European political and financial leaders might be able to cobble together one short-term fix after another until some sort of workable long-term solution can be agreed upon—but that’s only possible if there is enough economic growth in the interim to keep all wheels on the tracks. Without growth, it’s difficult to see how a train wreck can be averted."

 

Richard Heinberg provides a different and much more convincing narrative of the European debt crisis from the perspective of Europe being the first continent to taste the bitter pil of a post-growth society.


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Royal Society Calls for Redistribution of Wealth and More Birth Control to Save Planet

Royal Society Calls for Redistribution of Wealth and More Birth Control to Save Planet | Broad Canvas | Scoop.it

"The Royal Society wants the world to do something about population growth in a bid to stave off environmental and economic calamity, according to a new report dubbed “People and the Planet” released on April 26. At the same time, the excessive consumption of the world’s richest billion people must be restrained so that pets in the U.S. don’t consume more resources than people in Bangladesh." (Source: Scientific American blog )

 

A new report by the UK's Royal Society states some inconvenient truths and gets storm of critique from growth fundamentalists.


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Helen Clark: Putting Resilience at the Heart of the Development Agenda | UNDP

Helen Clark: Putting Resilience at the Heart of the Development Agenda | UNDP | Broad Canvas | Scoop.it

"At UNDP, we see development challenges in the 21st Century as different in nature, scale, and scope from those of the past. If our world is to be one in which poverty is eradicated, and inequality reduced; and where growth is inclusive and production and consumption do not break planetary boundaries; and if we are to be effective in combating the effects of climate change; we need to look beyond our traditional interventionist logic to harness the agency of people, their communities, and institutions. It is this logic which has led UNDP to encapsulate its mission statement in the simple phrase: Empowered Lives, Resilient Nations. This speaks to both means and ends. Empowered people can build resilient nations."

 

Excellent speech by UNDP Administrator Helen Clark although she has yet to break free from the growth obsession.


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Rio+20: Tim Jackson on how fear led world leaders to betray green economy

Rio+20: Tim Jackson on how fear led world leaders to betray green economy | Broad Canvas | Scoop.it
The author of Prosperity Without Growth says that despite a staggering lack of responsibility from politicians, there is still a route to a better economic system...

 

Critical assessment in the Guardian by UK professor Tim Jackson.


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IMF Working Paper predicts doubling of oil prices in coming decade

A new internal working paper for the International Monetary Fund acknowledges physical constraints for oil production (peak oil) and foresees higher oil prices with negative impacts on economic growth.


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A Primer on Peak Oil

A Primer on Peak Oil | Broad Canvas | Scoop.it

Three top financial news sites this week report on the reality of peak oil: The Economist, the Financial Times and French Le Figaro. At Economonitor, Edward Harrison compares the three articles and explains the difference between hard peak and soft peak and the upcoming "chaotic energy transition".


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China's rapid economic growth means population is 'wealthier but unhappier’

China's rapid economic growth means population is 'wealthier but unhappier’ | Broad Canvas | Scoop.it
The average personal income in China has risen by five per cent a year since the mid 1990s. Yet according to experts, this recent wealth does not equate with personal happiness.

 

A new research project confirms that fast economic growth does not automatically translate into more life happiness as rising social inequality and environmental pressures create tensions in Chinese economy.


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