Brittany's A Midsummer Night's Dream
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(Lit Crit) Anamorphism and Theseus'Dream

(Lit Crit) Anamorphism and Theseus'Dream | Brittany's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Brittany Senecal's insight:

From exploring different articles on the Bloom's website I had found this one specfically about Anamorphism and Theseus' Dream. Anamorphism was used back in the Renaissance age to let people see the perspective of  technique designed to present one image if viewed from directly in front of the painting and another if viewed from an angle. Shakespeare does something similar to this by converting the painting into a play that the audience sees from three different perspectives. "We don't have to change seats during a performance to find the proper anamorphic angle; Shakespeare does our moving for us by making the "seen"—that is, the scene—change, in effect presenting us with a painting in three panels. First he gives us a straight-on look at Athens, then shifts our perspective by obliging us to consider the forest, then brings Athens back in the third panel and says, "Look again."


Text Citation (Chicago Manual of Style format): Calderwood, James L. "A Midsummer Night's Dream: Anamorphism and Theseus'Dream."Shakespeare Quarterly, Volume 42, Number 4 (Winter 1991): 409–30. Quoted as "A Midsummer Night's Dream: Anamorphism and Theseus'Dream" in Bloom, Harold, ed. A Midsummer Night's Dream, Bloom's Modern Critical Interpretations. New York: Chelsea House Publishing, 2010.Bloom's Literary Reference Online. Facts on File, Inc. http://www.fofweb.com/activelink2.asp?ItemID=WE54&SID=5&iPin= MCIMS005&SingleRecord=True (accessed April 2, 2013).

 

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Jessica Vandergriff's curator insight, April 21, 10:26 AM
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(Source) The truth behind Thisbe and Pyramus

(Source) The truth behind Thisbe and Pyramus | Brittany's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
EBSCOhost (ebscohost.com) serves thousands of libraries and other institutions with premium content in every subject area. Free LISTA: LibraryResearch.com
Brittany Senecal's insight:

SORCE

 

In A Midsummer Night's Dream, the character, Thisbe, a character from mythology is represented by Flute in the play within a play, Pyramus and Thisbe. The myth behind this story originated in the Asia Minor. The tale was known as the river god Pyramus for the fountain Thisbe. The background behind this myth was that Pyramus and Thisbe were in love but Thisbe's parents forbaded their love. The two lovers did not let that stop them, seeing how every night they would sneak out to see each other and talk through the walls just to hear the words the other would talk. They had a plan to later sneak into a tomb to meet each other. Thisbe was caught off guard when a lion came her way and ate her to shreds. Pyramus discovered the body and later commited suicide seeing how he would know longer be able to live without the love of his life. As you can see Shakespeare's story's all connect in someways. Plays such as Romeo and Juilet also relate to A Midsummer's Night seeing how two lovers are crossed together but their parents do not agree with the relationship. 

 

Findlay A. Thisbe. Women In Shakespeare [serial online]. March 2010;:393-395. Available from: Literary Reference Center, Ipswich, MA. Accessed March 26, 2013.

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(Historical) Daughters Rights in the Renaissance Age

(Historical) Daughters Rights in the Renaissance Age | Brittany's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it

Works Cited

"Daughters." Shakespeare's Theatre: A Dictionary Of His Stage Context (2004): 137-138. Literary Reference Center. Web. 24 Mar. 2013.

Brittany Senecal's insight:

HISTORICAL

 

Daughters Rights in the Renaissance Age were poor. During the Renaissance Age it was an extremely male-dominated society. The women basically lived with no rights at all but to follow instructions from a male figure. Back in this time, daughters had to obey all of their fathers rules. That included doing duties such as staying in to mantain a home, and watch the children (brothers, sisters). Generally daughters were considered to be under the authority of her father until she married, and then was under the authority of her husband. The father also had a say in who she would marry. This relates to A Midsummer Night's Dream seeing how Hermia is in love with Lysander and the two want to get married. The father does not approve of this and forces Hermia to forget about Lysander and marry Demetrius. 

 

daughters. Shakespeare's Theatre: A Dictionary Of His Stage Context [serial online]. January 2004;:137-138. Available from: Literary Reference Center, Ipswich, MA. Accessed March 26, 2013

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(Image) An intriguing outlook through the arts of Shakespeare

(Image) An intriguing outlook through the arts of Shakespeare | Brittany's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Brittany Senecal's insight:

As you can see this image portrays the characters Bottom and Titainia engaging in an intimate dance. Shakespeare was known for writing "lovey dovey" romantic, and poetic storys. This image brings out his story of A Midsummer Night's Dream but in a different form of art. This dance tells a story about how Bottom and Titainia first fell in love. 

 

Popkin, Michael. "New Casting in a Midsummer Night's Dream." Danceviewtimes. DanceView, 27 Apr. 2006. Web. 02 Mar. 2013.

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(Video) A modern intake of " A Midsummer Night's Dream"

(Video) A modern intake of " A Midsummer Night's Dream" | Brittany's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
TubeChop allows you to easily chop a funny or interesting section from any YouTube video and share it.
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VIDEO

 

Design set's have a big intake in plays and movies. How might A Midsummer Night's Dream be if they modernized the sets? In this video clip it shows a different perspective on the sets. As you can see they have a modern twist on them. The sets are bigger, have fine detail and make things stand out more. With these sets standing out more the audience has the chance to connect with the scences and see what is really going on. Changing the set to be modern is a drastic change from back in the Elizabethan Age where everything was proper. 

 

""A Midsummer Night's Dream" Set Design Slideshow." YouTube. YouTube, 19 Jan. 2011. Web. 24 Mar. 2013.

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