British Landscapes Photography
5.2K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Derek Fogg
onto British Landscapes Photography
Scoop.it!

National Parks: Stunning view of Snowdonia takes top place in photo contest celebrating UK's best national park vistas

National Parks: Stunning view of Snowdonia takes top place in photo contest celebrating UK's best national park vistas | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
The winning photo, by amateur photographer Michal Tekel, shows Cwm Idwal in the Glyderau range of mountains in Wales and was snapped using a digital Nikon D700.
more...
No comment yet.
British Landscapes Photography
"celebrating the landscapes of the British Isles through photography"
Curated by Derek Fogg
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Derek Fogg
Scoop.it!

Print of the Month - January 2017

Print of the Month - January 2017 | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
This year is the fifth year that I have been offering "Print of the Month" and so to start off I have selected one from my "Intimate Landscapes" Collection.
The image was captured on my trip to the Scottish Borders last year and shows the blue sky and clouds reflecting in the desolate, tranquil and part reed covered Loch Skeen which I reached after the rather strenuous walk up to the loch. The loch is the largest in the Southern Uplands, sitting at over 1650 feet above sea level and is surrounded by mountains, White Coomb is a Corbett and Mid Craig and Lochcraig Head are all over 2000 ft.



Don’t forget that that each image chosen will only be placed as Print of the Month once so if you like this particular image, buy it with 20% off the standard prices before the end of January. Even better Like my British Landscapes Photography Facebook Page and you can obtain 30% discount. There is a choice of an 18" by 12" print which is a perfect fit when mounted for 24" by 18" frames which are readily available via the internet or high street stores OR a 12" by 8" mounted print in a 16" by 12" frame of your choice.
To start or add to your collection just click on the image above and then select your choice of the two products listed, add to cart and then apply the Coupon Code JAN17 to obtain your 20% off the shown price at the checkout OR 30% having first Liked my Facebook page and applying the Code FBJAN17 before completing the purchase. If "Floating Clouds" is not one of your preferred images then by all means please share with me your favourites and I will see if we can make them available in due course.
If you wish to be notified directly about new issues you can sign up for my free update on the Print of the Month Collection by clicking this link and entering your details.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Derek Fogg
Scoop.it!

Scotland's Route 66 - North Coast 500 - Cape Wrath to Inverness

Scotland's Route 66 - North Coast 500 - Cape Wrath to Inverness | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
The final and concluding part of my time on the iconic road trip along the North Coast 500 begins in Durness where I had spent time visiting, amongst other places Cape Wrath. Before reading this I would suggest you at least don't miss Part 2 Applecross to Cape Wrath and if you don't want to miss any part of the journey so far you, including the crossing of The Bealach na Ba (Pass of the Cattle) a historic and quite famous pass through the mountains of the Applecross peninsula you could even start with Part 1 Inverness to Applecross.
Within 3 miles of my morning start I am revisiting the beach at Ceannabeinne. Traditionally the beach was known as Traigh Allt Chailgeag – the beach of the burn of bereavement and death. This referred to a story of how an elderly woman fell into the burn, which flows onto the beach, and drowned. The burn Allt Chailgeag, was in spate at the time and her body was washed down to the shore.



At low tide the beach as amazing patterns created in the sand and also exposes the wonderful colours of the Lewisian gneiss. It brought back memories of the "Sand Waves" image I captured on my last visit in 2011. This time it was the turn of the Lewisian gneiss to join my Intimate Landscapes Collection.



Moving on I round Loch Eriboll. After the Kyle of Durness it is the second of three sea lochs and river estuaries to indent this north coast. It is the widest and at 10 miles the longest. Loch Eriboll's most attractive feature is towards the end of the loch at Ard Neakie which you can see in the photograph below. This is a mound of land prevented from becoming an island by an umbilical cord of sand and shingle linking it to the east shore of the loch.



Shortly after I would usually be crossing the Kyle of Tongue, the third sea loch but on this occasion I decided to try the old single track road that you had to use before the causeway was built
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Derek Fogg
Scoop.it!

National Trails Calendar 2017

National Trails Calendar 2017 | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
National Trails are long distance walking, cycling and horse riding routes through the best landscapes in England and Wales. There are 15 National Trails. Walkers can enjoy them all, cyclists and horse riders can enjoy the Pennine Bridleway and the South Downs Way, as well as sections of the other Trails. In total, England and Wales have around 2,500 miles of National Trail.
The England Coast Path will be the newest (and longest) National Trail when it is complete in 2020. The first few sections are now open and more will be opening over the next few months.
For the first time National Trails have produced a calendar and I am pleased to say that two of my photos have been included.
May is shown below and features Elegug Stacks on the Pembrokeshire Coast Path. They are two pillars of limestone, a geographical feature caused naturally by the sea eroding weaknesses in the rock. They stand in the sea and are inaccessible from land – not least when the Ministry of Defence has closed off the nearby area to test tanks!
The Pembrokeshire Coast Path twists and turns its way for 186 miles along the most breathtaking coastline in Britain. It covers almost every kind of maritime landscape from rugged cliff tops and sheltered coves to wide-open beaches and winding estuaries.



September features the cliffs at Hunstanton on the Norfolk Coast Path. They show an amazing slice of Britain's history and originate from just after the Jurassic period. This makes them 100 million years old and some of the oldest rocks visible in East Anglia.
The path takes you through fantastic scenery including a Roman Road, the unique Brecks, low cliffs and extensive sandy beaches and dunes and offers something for everyone from a gentle stroll to a 93 mile.



The calendar can be purchased for only £7.99 from the National Trails Shop along with many other items which will make ideal gifts at anytime of year as well as for Christmas
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Derek Fogg
Scoop.it!

Print of the Month - November 2016

Print of the Month - November 2016 | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
For November's "Print of the Month" I've selected one of my favourite images from the Broads National Park. It features Brograve Mill, a wind pump located on Brograve level in the parish of Sea Palling. The mill is a Grade II listed building now lying in an extremely dilapidated and unsafe state. Built in 1771 it is thought to have last worked around 1930. Its purpose was to drain the Brograve levels into the man-made Waxham New Cut.
The mill cannot be directly reached on foot. However, as I did you can follow the path next to the Waxham New Cut from Horsey Mere.
On my visit I was so fortunate with the weather. Blue skies with a couple of perfectly placed fluffy white clouds and just a wisp of other clouds in the distance. All coupled with a slight breeze which was just sufficient to move the reeds in the foreground in the same direction as what was apparently the largest sails on any Norfolk mill.



Don’t forget that that each image chosen will only be placed as Print of the Month once so if you like this particular image, buy it with 20% off the standard prices before the end of November. Even better Like my British Landscapes Photography Facebook Page and you can obtain 30% discount. There is a choice of an 18" by 12" print which is a perfect fit when mounted for 24" by 18" frames which are readily available via the internet or high street stores OR a 12" by 8" mounted print in a 16" by 12" frame of your choice.
To start or add to your collection just click on the image above and then select your choice from the Featured Products, add to cart and then apply the Coupon Code NOV16 to obtain your 20% off the shown price at the checkout OR 30% having first Liked my Facebook page and applying the Code FBNOV16 before completing the purchase. If "Brograve Mill" is not one of your preferred images then by all means please share with me your favourites and I will see if we can make them available in due course
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Derek Fogg
Scoop.it!

Print of the Month - October 2016

Print of the Month - October 2016 | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
October's Print of the Month is from near Malltraeth on the Isle of Anglesey in North Wales which lies in the south west corner of the island, at the head of the long inlet formed by the Cefni Estuary. Malltraeth means salt marsh in Welsh and the whole area is renowned for its birdlife and was once home to the talented wildlife artist Charles F. Tunnicliffe. The view is looking across the estuary towards Snowdonia and the Carneddau which includes the largest contiguous areas of high ground over 2,500 or 3,000 feet high in Wales and England.



Don’t forget that that each image chosen will only be placed as Print of the Month once so if you like this particular image, buy it with 20% off the standard prices before the end of October. Even better Like my British Landscapes Photography Facebook Page and you can obtain 30% discount.There is a choice of an A3 print which is a perfect fit when mounted for 20" by 16" frames which are readily available via the internet or high street stores OR a 12" by 8" mounted print in a 16" by 12" frame of your choice.

To start or add to your collection just click on the image above and then select your choice from the Featured Products, add to cart and then apply the Coupon Code OCT16 to obtain your 20% off the shown price at the checkout OR 30% having first Liked my Facebook page and applying the Code FBOCT16 before completing the purchase. If "Malltraeth Sands" is not one of your preferred images then by all means please share with me your favourites and I will see if we can make them available in due course.
If you wish to be notified directly about new issues you can sign up for my free update on the Print of the Month Collection by clicking this link and entering your details.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Derek Fogg
Scoop.it!

Scotland's Beautiful Borders

Scotland's Beautiful Borders | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
For those of you who may have read about my trip to the Northumberland National Park you will be aware that from there I travelled into the Scottish Borders for a few days. My original intention was to stay in the more central location of Melrose but due to the lack of availability of space on my favoured campsite I had to stay in Jedburgh - not that there is anything wrong with Jedburgh, it just meant I had slightly more travelling each day to my intended photo spots.
Lying just south of Melrose and found within the Tweed Valley are the triple peaks of the Eildon Hills, a prominent feature in the Scottish Borders and my first walk and photo location. Formed around 350 million years ago, the hills are made of volcanic rock and surrounded by softer sedimentary rocks that have eroded to leave the hills we see now.
One of the most photographed locations in the Scottish Borders is Scott's View of the Eildon Hills. Named after the poet, playwright and novelist Sir Walter Scott this was his favourite view when he lived at Abbotsford House.



Having taken in the famous view of the hills I wanted to get close up and hit the summits. During my research of the area I came across Bowdenmoor reservoir which lies a couple of miles south west of Melrose where access to the hills can be gained without following everyone else up the traditional walking routes from Melrose. On arrival I was greeted by a raft of water lilies covering the water, an attractive fringe of woodland and a lovely view of the Eildon Hills which all combine to great effect.



Although many of the lilies where still not open a combination of the open and partly open ones set against the smooth and sometimes breeze affected water gave me an opportunity to add to my Intimate Landscapes Collection.



All of the walking routes I had with me started from Melrose so starting at Bowdenmoor and not knowing the area I was immediately at a disadvantage as to the best route to take up to the hill summits
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Derek Fogg
Scoop.it!

Print of the Month - July 2016

Print of the Month - July 2016 | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
Looking back over the last few Prints of the Month I was surprised to find that it was the end of last year when Wales was last included so let's put that right by featuring for the first time one of my images from last years Summer trip to South and West Wales.
Think Laugharne, think Dylan Thomas. Even if the poet, writer and broadcaster Dylan Thomas lived at the Boathouse in Laugharne for the last four years of his tragically short life, it is a truly remarkable place to visit. The Boathouse offers wonderful views of the Taf estuary and the Gower; a haven for egrets, lapwings, herons, oystercatchers, seals and otters with fishermen and cocklers continuing the ancient traditions.



Don’t forget that that each image chosen will only be placed as Print of the Month once so if you like this particular image, buy it with 20% off the standard prices before the end of July. Even better Like my British Landscapes Photography Facebook Page and you can obtain 30% discount.There is a choice of an A3 print which is a perfect fit when mounted for 20" by 16" frames which are readily available via the internet or high street stores OR a 12" by 8" mounted print in a 16" by 12" frame of your choice.

To start or add to your collection just click on the image above and then select your choice from the Featured Products, add to cart and then apply the Coupon Code JUL16 to obtain your 20% off the shown price at the checkout OR 30% having first Liked my Facebook page and applying the Code FBJUL16 before completing the purchase. If "The Boathouse - Laugharne" is not one of your preferred images then by all means please share with me your favourites and I will see if we can make them available in due course.
If you wish to be notified directly about new issues you can sign up for my free update on the Print of the Month Collection by clicking this link and entering your details.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Derek Fogg
Scoop.it!

Northumberland National Park - England's Most Tranquil Location celebrates 60 years

Northumberland National Park - England's Most Tranquil Location celebrates 60 years | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
Earlier this year the Northumberland National Park celebrated 60 years since it's formation and as the only National Park I have not spent any time exploring I was determined to visit this year. Northumberland is known as England's Secret Kingdom and it's National Park is situated to the west of the county, sandwiched between Scotland to the North and West, the rest of Northumberland to the East and Hadrian's Wall to the South. There are around 405 square miles of superb wilderness within the National Park to explore and I had only a few days to make the most of it. The landscape is an outstanding mix of high hills, dales and crystal clear rivers and, not forgetting, the magnificent Kielder Water - Northern Europe's biggest man made lake. Within the Park the population is less than 2.5 people per square mile, but when you consider that most live in the small villages dotted around the Park, you really can get away from it all. Northumberland's National Park is officially England's most tranquil location.
Having visited the best of Hadrian's Wall before I decided on this occasion to go straight to my first stopover at Bellingham. Arriving late afternoon and a pleasant evening in prospect I decided to take the 3 mile round magical walk over six bridges to Hareshaw Linn, a 30 foot high waterfall set in fantastic ancient woodland at the head of Hareshaw Dene. Here the Hareshaw Burn plunges over a band of resistant sandstone overlying softer shales. The waterfall erodes the shales and undercuts the harder rocks which collapse in blocks allowing the flowing water to display creative cascades.



The following day I made my way to Kielder with the largest working forest in England at over 250 square miles. Parking at Leaplish Waterside Park my plan was to walk round the Bull Crag Peninsula hoping to find good photo opportunities of the Water
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Derek Fogg
Scoop.it!

Print of the Month - June 2016

Print of the Month - June 2016 | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
June's Print of the Month features an image from my trip to Dumfries and Galloway in the Summer of 2014.
Dumfries and Galloway – one of Scotland’s best kept secrets is also known as the "Scottish Riviera" and contains a wide range of different landscapes. The coastline stretches from the tidal flats of the Solway Firth in the east, flats on a scale not found elsewhere in Scotland, to the sea cliffs of the Mull of Galloway, Scotland’s most southerly point, from where you can look across to Ireland and the Isle of Man.
Inland however is Britain's largest forest park, the 300 square miles of the Galloway Forest Park, known affectionately as the "highlands of the lowlands" and boasts tranquil valleys encompassed by heather-clad hills, rugged rock faces, burns cascading down majestic slopes and the forest, moorland and lochs rising up to the grandeur of the mountains.
Although most of my trip was spent along the coast I did manage just one day to walk around Loch Trool, a body of water lying in Glen Trool. It is the source of the Water of Trool which flows to the Water of Minnoch and the Cree. It was the location, in 1307, of the Battle of Glen Trool. Bruce's Stone stands in monument to the battle. Loch Trool is also reported to be the darkest place in the UK at night.



Don’t forget that that each image chosen will only be placed as Print of the Month once so if you like this particular image, buy it with 20% off the standard prices before the end of June. Even better Like my British Landscapes Photography Facebook Page and you can obtain 30% discount.
There is a choice of an A3 print which is a perfect fit when mounted for 20" by 16" frames which are readily available via the internet or high street stores OR a 12" by 8" mounted print in a 16" by 12" frame of your choice
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Derek Fogg
Scoop.it!

Print of the Month - May 2016

Print of the Month - May 2016 | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
I've gone way back in the archives for May's Print of The Month, in fact to Autumn 2007 with this image which is one of my all time favourites and also one of the best sellers on the website. The weather throughout the day had been "dreich". For those of you who are not familiar with this Scottish term it means a combination of dull, overcast, drizzly, cold, misty and miserable weather. I believe that at least 4 of those adjectives must apply before the weather is truly dreich.
I had spent the day driving around Loch Leven looking for suitable opportunities without any success but before giving up for the day I went back to one of my earlier locations. Fortunately my patience and perseverance paid off when for a brief moment the sun managed to break through the clouds and with almost perfectly still waters in the foreground I managed to capture this image against the stunning backdrop of The Pap of Glencoe which lies at the western end of the Aonach Eagach ridge. The Pap has a distinctive conical shape particularly when viewed from the west, and forms part of the "classic" view of the entrance to Glencoe.



Don’t forget that that each image chosen will only be placed as Print of the Month once so if you like this particular image, buy it with 20% off the standard prices before the end of May. Even better Like my British Landscapes Photography Facebook Page and you can obtain 30% discount.
There is a choice of an A3 print which is a perfect fit when mounted for 20" by 16" frames which are readily available via the internet or high street stores OR a 12" by 8" mounted print in a 16" by 12" frame of your choice.
To start or add to your collection just click on the image above and then select your choice from the Featured Products, add to cart and then apply the Coupon Code MAY16 to obtain your 20% off the shown price at the checkout OR 30% having first Liked my Facebook page and applying the Code FBMAY16 before completing the purchase
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Derek Fogg
Scoop.it!

Print of the Month - April 2016

Print of the Month - April 2016 | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
For this month's print I'm recalling a photo trip from 2010 when I caught the ferry to the "Queen of the Hebrides" the Isle of Islay where I spent a few days overlooking Loch Indaal at Port Charlotte.
Loch Gruinart is perhaps one of the most beautiful parts of Islay offering stunning views combined with unique wildlife and rare birds. Here I was as close to the Antrim coast of Ireland as I was to the mainland of Scotland.
The coastal scenery around the Rinns is very impressive, particularly at Killinallan Point where this view was photographed. A beautiful and lonely headland at the far northeast of Loch Gruinart, Killinallan Point consists of a dune system with very interesting wind shaped sand figures and beautiful beaches surrounding the point. It's typically the place where the tides from the Atlantic Ocean meet the water in Loch Gruinart and from where the many Barnacle Geese can be seen first when they return to Islay for the winter.



Don’t forget that that each image chosen will only be placed as Print of the Month once so if you like this particular image, buy it with 20% off the standard prices before the end of April. Even better Like my British Landscapes Photography Facebook Page and you can obtain 30% discount.
There is a choice of an A3 print which is a perfect fit when mounted for 20" by 16" frames which are readily available via the internet or high street stores OR a 12" by 8" mounted print in a 16" by 12" frame of your choice.
To start or add to your collection just click on the image above and then select your choice from the Featured Products, add to cart and then apply the Coupon Code APR16 to obtain your 20% off the shown price at the checkout OR 30% having first Liked my Facebook page and applying the Code FBAPR16 before completing the purchase. If "Killinallan Point" is not one of your preferred images then by all means please share with me your favourites and I will see if we can make them available in due course
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Derek Fogg
Scoop.it!

Print of the Month - March 2016

Print of the Month - March 2016 | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
Something a little different this month - I am featuring for only the third time an image from my "Intimate Landscapes" Collection.
Not arranged by myself for the purposes of this image I came across the formation during a trip to North Devon when I walked down to Heddon's Mouth. It was the heart shaped rock that caught my attention without which I would not have made the shot.
At the start of the descent to the location you can enjoy the amazing drama of Exmoor's deepest V- shaped valley. It's called Heddon's Mouth Cleave and it must be one of the steepest, deepest valleys to be found anywhere in the region. The remoteness of the beach made it a favourite haunt for smugglers.



Don’t forget that that each image chosen will only be placed as Print of the Month once so if you like this particular image, buy it with 20% off the standard prices before the end of March.
There is a choice of an A3 print which is a perfect fit when mounted for 20" by 16" frames which are readily available via the internet or high street stores OR a 12" by 8" mounted print in a 16" by 12" frame of your choice.
To start or add to your collection just click on the image above and then select your choice from the Featured Products, add to cart and then apply the Coupon Code MAR16 to obtain your 20% off the shown price at the checkout before completing the purchase. If "Rock Heart" is not one of your preferred images then by all means please share with me your favourites and I will see if we can make them available in due course.
If you wish to be notified directly about new issues you can sign up for my free update on the Print of the Month Collection by clicking this link and entering your details.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Derek Fogg
Scoop.it!

Print of the Month - February 2016

Print of the Month - February 2016 | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
This months print is from the south coast of England and shows The Seven Sisters which are a series of chalk cliffs by the English Channel. They form part of the South Downs National Park in East Sussex, between the towns of Seaford and Eastbourne. They are the remnants of dry valleys in the chalk South Downs, which are gradually being eroded by the sea.
Captured near Birling Gap whilst the tide was out and before a bracing walk along the length of the cliffs to Cuckmere Haven. Part of the South Downs Way, the route either climbs steeply or descends steeply which tests both lungs and legs, however it is worth every bit of effort. The landscape is breath taking as you walk on top of the shear white cliffs. The cliffs are unprotected and in some area are undercut so please do not get too close to the edge!



Don’t forget that that each image chosen will only be placed as Print of the Month once so if you like this particular image, buy it with 20% off the standard prices before the end of February.
There is a choice of an A3 print which is a perfect fit when mounted for 20" by 16" frames which are readily available via the internet or high street stores OR a 12" by 8" mounted print in a 16" by 12" frame of your choice.
To start or add to your collection just click on the image above and then select your choice from the Featured Products, add to cart and then apply the Coupon Code FEB16 to obtain your 20% off the shown price at the checkout before completing the purchase. If "Seven Sisters" is not one of your preferred images then by all means please share with me your favourites and I will see if we can make them available in due course.
If you wish to be notified directly about new issues you can sign up for my free update on the Print of the Month Collection by clicking this link and entering your details.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Derek Fogg
Scoop.it!

Year in Review - 2016 - Scotland Bottom to Top

Year in Review - 2016 - Scotland Bottom to Top | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
Although my photo trips in 2016 were limited there is one stand out feature and that is they started in the Scottish Borders and finished by visiting the most northerly points on the British mainland including Cape Wrath on my North Coast 500 trip.
It is not my intention to repeat those trip reviews but to share a number of my favourite photos of the year. For those who have not already read those reviews you can catch up on them by following the highlighted links above.
My visit to the Scottish Borders started by passing through the Northumberland National Park which was celebrating it's 60th year since formation in 1956 so although I have other favourites from there I have only included the one below so I stick to the theme for this post. This is Hareshaw Linn or has I have renamed it - "Creative Cascades". Here the Hareshaw Burn plunges over a band of resistant sandstone overlying softer shales. The waterfall erodes the shales and undercuts the harder rocks which collapse in blocks allowing the flowing water to display creative cascades.
Follow the link to see and read more about my Northumberland - England's Most Tranquil Location trip.




Now into the Borders and two photos from the Eildon Hills and it's surroundings. First up is where I started my walk to the top of the hills. Originally a reservoir for a local hospital now privately owned it is known as Bowden Loch or by some as the Swan Pond. Eildon Mid Hill is prominent in the background centre left, with Eildon Little Hill to the right. Unfortunately my visit didn't coincide with when the water lilies were in full bloom.



Not the highest of the hills that form the Eildons but the summit of Eildon North Hill is crowned by the largest hill fort in Scotland. St. Cuthbert's Way crosses the Eildon Hills on its way from Melrose to Lindisfarne
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Derek Fogg
Scoop.it!

Print of the Month - December 2016

Print of the Month - December 2016 | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
For December's Print of the Month we are back in Scotland on the Isle of Islay in the Inner Hebrides and one from my visit in 2010.
Saligo Bay sits in the north west corner of Islay. Atlantic waves break on the shore and westerly winds drive straight up the beach. Islay's most beautiful bay, according to many. From this point 3000 miles due west is the coast line of North America and only water in between. Saligo Bay offers one of the most beautiful light conditions according to some photographers and is a favourite spot for people to watch and photograph an Atlantic Sunset.



Don’t forget that that each image chosen will only be placed as Print of the Month once so if you like this particular image, buy it with 20% off the standard prices before the end of December. Even better Like my British Landscapes Photography Facebook Page and you can obtain 30% discount. There is a choice of an 18" by 12" print which is a perfect fit when mounted for 24" by 18" frames which are readily available via the internet or high street stores OR a 12" by 8" mounted print in a 16" by 12" frame of your choice.
To start or add to your collection just click on the image above and then select your choice of the two products listed, add to cart and then apply the Coupon Code DEC16 to obtain your 20% off the shown price at the checkout OR 30% having first Liked my Facebook page and applying the Code FBDEC16 before completing the purchase. If "Saligo Bay" is not one of your preferred images then by all means please share with me your favourites and I will see if we can make them available in due course.
If you wish to be notified directly about new issues you can sign up for my free update on the Print of the Month Collection by clicking this link and entering your details.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Derek Fogg
Scoop.it!

Scotland's Route 66 - North Coast 500 - Applecross to Cape Wrath

Scotland's Route 66 - North Coast 500 - Applecross to Cape Wrath | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
Welcome to the second part of my North Coast 500 photo trip starting this time from my overnight stop at Applecross. If you missed the start of this journey then I suggest you read Part One from Inverness to Applecross before returning to read about this stage.
Starting off from Applecross on a beautiful morning following the road around the peninsula I was treated to magnificent views across the Inner Sound to the Isles of Raasay, Rona and beyond the sunlit hills of the Isle of Skye before eventually arriving at Shieldaig.



After a short stop in Shieldaig the road started to climb out of the village and I was almost immediately presented with the view across the inlet of Ob Mheallaidh (Deceitful Bay), a bay on the southern shore of Upper Loch Torridon towards Beinn Alligin (Jewelled Mountain), Beinn Dearg (Red Mountain) and Liathach (The Grey One) all of which are over 3000 feet.
The Torridon Hills exhibit some of the most dramatic mountain scenery in the British Isles, perhaps only surpassed in grandeur by The Cuillins on Skye. The rocks are made of Torridonian sandstone, some of which are crowned by white Cambrian quartzite. They are amongst the oldest rocks in Britain, and sit on yet older rocks, Lewisian gneiss.



Continuing on along the road above Loch Torridon the day started to fall apart. Shortly after the stop to take in the view above I stopped again pulling on to some gravel to take more photos. Immediately I got out of the camper I heard the noise of air coming out of one of the tyres and within two minutes it was completely flat. My heart sank and I wondered how I was going to sort this out in such a remote location. Whilst I had a spare wheel/tyre trying to change it on the sloping gravel would be too dangerous. I thought my best option was to drive up the hill to try to find some level ground where it could be changed. Fortunately I had better luck when I found a large lay by only a few yards further on at the top of the hill
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Derek Fogg
Scoop.it!

Scotland's Route 66 - North Coast 500 - Inverness to Applecross

Scotland's Route 66 - North Coast 500 - Inverness to Applecross | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
The North Coast 500 which launched in the Spring of 2015 is a 516 mile scenic route around the north coast of Scotland, starting and ending at Inverness. The North Coast 500 (Also known as NC500) was created by the North Highland Initiative and was designed to bring together the best of the north Highlands of Scotland in one iconic touring route.



The route was named fifth in Now Travel Magazine's "Top 6 Coastal Routes in the World" It has been described as "Scotland's Route 66". Whilst I have only driven a very small part of the "Route 66" over the years I have driven most of the roads now comprising the NC500. In fact the only part I have not driven before is some of the East coast return leg to Inverness and I am certain that at least on scenery alone the NC500 can more than match "Route 66"
Whilst I had already visited Scotland once this year on my trip to the Scottish Borders I never get tired of returning there especially when there is a reason to visit the West coast and the remote North Highlands. My journey started with a 500 mile day drive to Inverness and a rest before starting the route the following day.
Leaving my overnight stop on a beautiful morning and entering Inverness the first thing I noticed was that there are no signs directing you to the route. Having negotiated my way through the rush hour traffic I very quickly found myself driving along side the beautiful Beauly Firth eventually passing through Beauly and Muir of Ord. Twenty miles in the village of Contin and I came across the first and only signs of marketing for the NC500 and that was for a teeshirt and no I didn't buy one.



My first photo stop was at Rogie Falls which are accessible by a short walk from a road side car park. You can get up close to these impressive water falls on a new suspension bridge across the beautiful Black Water river
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Derek Fogg
Scoop.it!

Britain's Historic Harbours

Britain's Historic Harbours | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
Being an island the British people and its history have a strong connection to the sea and on my trips around the country I often come across some wonderful opportunities to capture images of the many small harbours dotted around the coast. I am going to take you to four such harbours none of which are located in the most highly inhabited areas and two are only accessible on foot. We going to start on the Isle of Mull with two harbours which in the past were part of the old drovers route used in the transporting of livestock from the various islands and less accessible areas of the Highlands. In the north west of the island is Croig, a natural harbour which was the first stop after crossing from the Isles of Rum and Eigg and today is used as a base for whale-watching trips with fishing boats also operating from its small jetty.



Having guided the livestock across Mull right down to the south west corner the drovers would have arrived at the Old Ferry House. An atmospheric building with a colourful history, having played a prominent role on Mull over the years. Beautifully situated overlooking the Firth of Lorne at Grass Point, meaning 'the field of the rock' in Gaelic, it began life as the Ferry Inn and was an important stop-off point for drovers travelling to market in Oban from Croig, Coll, Tiree and Ardnamurchan. Later, the building fell into a state of disrepair before being renovated by an army captain and his wife after the Second World War. It even featured in the 1971 film "When Eight Bells Toll" whose star, Anthony Hopkins, stayed in the house during filming. Until 1881 a regular packet boat operated between Oban and Grass Point. This was replaced that year by a daily steamer service from Oban to Tobermory.



Still in Scotland we visit the first of the two harbours which are now only accessible on foot. In fact Laggan Harbour on the north east coast as always only been accessible by foot or of course by boat
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Derek Fogg
Scoop.it!

Print of the Month - September 2016

Print of the Month - September 2016 | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
This month I am recalling my trip through the Outer Hebrides in 2008 when the majority of the time I was favoured with glorious weather. In fact I could have been mistaken that I was in the Caribbean. The view shows the channel, about one mile across, between Eriksay and South Uist, once crossed by ferry which was replaced by a causeway in 2002.



Don’t forget that that each image chosen will only be placed as Print of the Month once so if you like this particular image, buy it with 20% off the standard prices before the end of September. Even better Like my British Landscapes Photography Facebook Page and you can obtain 30% discount.There is a choice of an A3 print which is a perfect fit when mounted for 20" by 16" frames which are readily available via the internet or high street stores OR a 12" by 8" mounted print in a 16" by 12" frame of your choice.
To start or add to your collection just click on the image above and then select your choice from the Featured Products, add to cart and then apply the Coupon Code SEPT16 to obtain your 20% off the shown price at the checkout OR 30% having first Liked my Facebook page and applying the Code FBSEPT16 before completing the purchase. If "Sound of Eriksay" is not one of your preferred images then by all means please share with me your favourites and I will see if we can make them available in due course.
If you wish to be notified directly about new issues you can sign up for my free update on the Print of the Month Collection by clicking this link and entering your details.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Derek Fogg
Scoop.it!

Print of the Month - August 2016

Print of the Month - August 2016 | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
It is almost six months since I featured a location from England so this time I have selected one from the North York Moors National Park. Robin Hood’s Bay is a small fishing village and a bay located five miles south of Whitby and 15 miles north of Scarborough. Bay Town, its local name, is in the ancient chapelry of Fylingdales.
The origin of the name is uncertain, and it is doubtful if Robin Hood was ever in the vicinity. An English ballad and legend tell a story of Robin Hood encountering French pirates who came to pillage the fisherman's boats and the northeast coast. The pirates surrendered and Robin Hood returned the loot to the poor people in the village that is now called Robin Hood's Bay.



Don’t forget that that each image chosen will only be placed as Print of the Month once so if you like this particular image, buy it with 20% off the standard prices before the end of August. Even better Like my British Landscapes Photography Facebook Page and you can obtain 30% discount.There is a choice of an A3 print which is a perfect fit when mounted for 20" by 16" frames which are readily available via the internet or high street stores OR a 12" by 8" mounted print in a 16" by 12" frame of your choice.
To start or add to your collection just click on the image above and then select your choice from the Featured Products, add to cart and then apply the Coupon Code AUG16 to obtain your 20% off the shown price at the checkout OR 30% having first Liked my Facebook page and applying the Code FBAUG16 before completing the purchase. If "Robin Hood's Bay" is not one of your preferred images then by all means please share with me your favourites and I will see if we can make them available in due course.
If you wish to be notified directly about new issues you can sign up for my free update on the Print of the Month Collection by clicking this link and entering your details.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Derek Fogg
Scoop.it!

Standing with Stones

Standing with Stones | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
Britain is littered with the remains of past lives, civilisations and cultures, including standing stones many of which remain a source of mystery and conjecture with over 1000 examples still surviving to this day, including famous examples like Avebury, the Rollright Stones and Stonehenge. When trying to decide on a subject for this article I was surprised to find that I had not previously covered these wonderful megalithic objects that bring a mysterious dimension to the landscape. On this journey round a few of these stones we will visit both England and Scotland including the Outer Hebrides where we make our first stop at one of the more well known locations.



Situated near the village of Calanais, Isle of Lewis on a ridge of land above Loch Roag, Calanais is one of the more remote stone circles in the British Isles. The circle consists of a central stone just under five metres in height, surrounded by a circle of thirteen stones. Whilst on the Isle of Lewis we pop over the bridge to Great Bernera and the Cleitir standing stones. Great Bernera is an island set between the sea lochs of East and West Loch Roag on the north west coast of Lewis. Until the 1950s, when Bernera was linked to the main island of Lewis by a bridge, which was the first pre-stressed concrete bridge in Europe, there was a small ferry boat. Cattle were regularly swum across, the narrows. The "Cleitir" (Gaelic for cliffs) standing stones now overlook the bridge.



Over on the Scottish mainland we head South and take another ferry to the Isle of Arran. On the west coast of the island lies a windswept and mystical peat bog called Machrie Moor. Bronze Age stone circles and standing stones are strewn across its barren, undulating terrain. One of the stone circles is known as Fingal's Cauldron Seat, where sits a stone with a carved hole. The legendary warrior giant Fingal is said to have tethered his favourite dog Bran to this stone
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Derek Fogg
Scoop.it!

Lighthouses around the British Coast

Lighthouses around the British Coast | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
It's time to take another whistle stop tour of the many varying aspects of the British landscape.
During my travels around the British Isles coast I am nearly always guaranteed I will find a lighthouse often sighted in spectacular locations. With over a hundred working lighthouses around the mainland including some that are not very accessible there are many I have not yet even seen, never mind photographed, but I am certain there will be plenty more opportunities on my travels.
This time I share just five with you including three in Scotland and two in England. We'll start off on the west coast of Scotland and one of my favourite locations of Wester Ross.



Rubha Reidh meaning Smooth Point in Gaelic is a prominent headland jutting into The Minch about halfway between Stoer Head and the Isle of Skye. It was opened in 1912 and cost almost £15000 to build and until a road was built in 1962 was only accessible by sea. In 1944, an American Liberty Ship the "William H Welch" missed the entrance to Loch Ewe and went ashore at Black Bay during a severe storm. Two light keepers were actively involved in the rescue of 15 survivors out of a complement of 74. Automated in 1986, the station is now operated as a vacation inn.
Our next lighthouse is in England, in fact Norfolk and is positioned on one of our most threaten coastlines at Happisburgh. The oldest working light in East Anglia, built in 1790, originally one of a pair - the tower is 85ft tall and the lantern is 134ft above sea level. Saved as a working light by the local community, it is maintained and operated entirely by voluntary contributions and is the only independently operated lighthouse in the UK.



Back to Scotland now and a visit to the "Queen of the Hebrides" - the Isle of Islay
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Derek Fogg
Scoop.it!

England's Longest Coastal Path - A Roller Coaster - Concluding Part

England's Longest Coastal Path - A Roller Coaster - Concluding Part | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
For those of you who read Part 1 of my photo trip along the South West Coast Path through Somerset and North Devon then welcome to Part 2 and in case you are only just joining me then may I suggest a look at Part 1 before continuing. Part 2 which will take us along the North Cornwall coast from it's boundary with North Devon all the way to Land's End turning east through South Cornwall and Devon and finally into Dorset and the end of England's Longest Coastal Path.
Crossing into Cornwall the coast along Bude Bay is a series of sandy beaches backed by lofty, crumbling cliffs. At low tide many of the beaches merge into one another to create continuous stretches of sand, providing enjoyable beach walking. Bude and it's surrounding areas is one of the most fascinating geological areas of Cornwall. The geology along this section of the Path is called the "Bude Formation" comprising of sand and mud layers deposited in a giant tropical "Lake Bude" 300 million years ago which were folded due to Britain and France colliding, forming a Cornish mountain range, before dinosaurs existed.



Wave eroded chevron folds - part of the Bude Formation showing at Wrangle Point. The beach here is characterised by dramatic sandstone formations, eroded from vertical strata and below the sandstone and shale beds folded into a syncline.



Passing through Crackington Haven I eventually reach Boscastle and just beyond is Willapark, a headland with a coastguard lookout on top. The name Willapark is made from two ancient Celtic words meaning 'Lookout' and 'Enclosed', and is therefore still highly apt. The modern lookout sits within the site of an Iron Age promontory fort, parts of which are still visible on the headland as a bank and ditch. The bay is known as Western Blackapit
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Derek Fogg
Scoop.it!

England's Longest Coastal Path - A Roller Coaster - Part I

England's Longest Coastal Path - A Roller Coaster - Part I | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
The South West Coast Path is one of the top walks to be found anywhere in the world with 630 miles of stunning scenery running from Minehead in Somerset, along the coasts of Devon and Cornwall, to Poole Harbour in Dorset. Since it rises and falls with every river mouth, it is also one of the more challenging trails. The total height climbed has been calculated to be just short of 115,000 ft, almost four times the height of Mount Everest. Although I have not completed the whole 630 miles, during my trips I have walked many sections of the path to gain access to locations I wanted to photograph so I thought I would share with you some of those images I have captured during those walks. The first part of this article will cover the trail to the North Cornwall boundary and I will follow up in due course with the remaining sections through Cornwall, South Devon and Dorset.
I'll start off at Minehead and almost immediately you are in the Exmoor National Park with it's coastal boundary stretching for 34 miles through Porlock and Lynmouth to Combe Martin. It's England's highest coastline and the path provides spectacular walking. An area I found particularly photogenic was Porlock Marsh and one of the few flat areas on the whole route. Severe storms at the end of 1996 breached the shingle barrier between Porlock Bay and the floodplain behind it, changing the nature of the marshes and creating a whole new ecosystem. On the saltmarsh itself, there is a plantation of stunted trees, long dead, raising their bare branches heavenwards like some primitive tribe turned to wood in retribution for some awful wrongdoing.



Crossing into North Devon eventually I reach Lynmouth on the northern edge of Exmoor. The village straddles the confluence of the West Lyn and East Lyn rivers, in a gorge 700 feet below Lynton, to which it is connected by the Lynton and Lynmouth Cliff Railway
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Derek Fogg
Scoop.it!

The Marvel of Mull

The Marvel of Mull | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
Back in 2010 I made my first visit to the Isle of Mull and unfortunately since then I have not had the opportunity to return.
The Isle of Mull is the second largest island of the Inner Hebrides and has an incredible coastline of 300 miles and from Mull you can visit other islands including Iona which was a centre of Irish monasticism for four centuries and is today renowned for its tranquility and natural beauty.



I arrived on Mull the long way round. Rather than following the easier route by ferry from Oban I went via the Ardnamurchan Peninsula and caught the small ferry from Kilchoan to Tobermory. A journey well worth following if only to allow you to see the stunning peninsula which is the most westerly part of the British mainland and is quite literally the end of the road. But more of that another time and lets concentrate on Mull. Our first stop is at Calgary Bay, located in the north west of Mull about 12 miles from the island's capital Tobermory, and is framed by low hills, partly wooded. A broad area of machair (a grassy meadow growing on calcareous sand) lies between the land and the beach. The name comes from the Gaelic, Cala ghearraidh, meaning Beach of the meadow (pasture). "Cala" is the word specifically used for a hard, sandy beach suitable for landing a boat, which relates plausibly to the location. A small stone pier, originally built to allow "puffers" (small steam driven cargo boats) to deliver coal to the Mornish Estate, was also used to take sheep to and from grazing on the Treshnish Isles and gives a further possible reason for the name of the bay.



Having mentioned the Treshnish Isles I thought it only fair that I give you a glimpse of them. The Treshnish Isles are today uninhabited but archaeological history reveals that they were settled as far back as Viking times with the last inhabitants leaving in the 1850's
more...
No comment yet.