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British Genealogy
British Genealogy and History of The British Isles
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Re-united after SEVENTY years: Couple separated by WWII meet again after grandmother spots her first love's name on a CD during trip to the seaside

Re-united after SEVENTY years: Couple separated by WWII meet again after grandmother spots her first love's name on a CD during trip to the seaside | British Genealogy | Scoop.it
Beryl Martin nee Tubb, from Worcester, has been re-united with her childhood sweetheart, Les Hogan, after spotting his name on a CD - 70 years after they last saw each other.
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First permanent British settlers in America were CANNIBALS who even ate a 14 year old girl to survive deadly 1609 winter

First permanent British settlers in America were CANNIBALS who even ate a 14 year old girl to survive deadly 1609 winter | British Genealogy | Scoop.it
US experts have revealed the bones of a 14-year-old girl found in Jamestown show clear signs that she was cannibalized during a bitter winter in 1609.
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World's oldest railway tunnel hidden by a rockery for 36 years is discovered 10ft underground in a back garden

World's oldest railway tunnel hidden by a rockery for 36 years is discovered 10ft underground in a back garden | British Genealogy | Scoop.it
The historic Fritchley Tunnel, in Crich, Derbyshire, can be traced back to 1793, two years earlier than the previous record holder. The tunnel was nearly lost forever when a previous land owner sealed up the passage in 1977 to build a rockery.
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How can we improve our online First World War Centenary information and resources?FWWC Users 1914.org Survey FINAL

The First World War Centenary is drawing closer and we would like to know what your interests are in commemorating the First World War.
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Binge drink (16th century) Britain! How the Tudors were worried by alcohol-related violence because most people drank beer for breakfast

Binge drink (16th century) Britain! How the Tudors were worried by alcohol-related violence because most people drank beer for breakfast | British Genealogy | Scoop.it
A new book reveals the extraordinary drinking habits of the Tudor period, when people drank beer for breakfast because it was thought to be healthier than water.
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King Arthur tales 'penned in Oxford'

King Arthur tales 'penned in Oxford' | British Genealogy | Scoop.it
A medieval book which popularised the story of King Arthur was probably written in a lost Oxford church, researchers say.
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Final journey of a queen 50 years later: Yugoslav royal returned to her native country after being exhumed from Windsor's royal burial ground

Final journey of a queen 50 years later: Yugoslav royal returned to her native country after being exhumed from Windsor's royal burial ground | British Genealogy | Scoop.it
The body of Queen Maria of Yugoslavia will be returned to her home country after spending more than 50 years buried in the royal burial ground in Windsor.
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A Notting Hill slum. An ill-fated mother. A feckless cheating father... and the sister who saved me: Former Home Secretary Alan Johnson's account of a Dickensian childhood of poverty and hardship

A Notting Hill slum. An ill-fated mother. A feckless cheating father... and the sister who saved me: Former Home Secretary Alan Johnson's account of a Dickensian childhood of poverty and hardship | British Genealogy | Scoop.it
In a political memoir like no other, Alan Johnson, MP, tells the story of a little boy growing up in a houseshare on a poverty-stricken street in West London.
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Auschwitz death camp guard, 93, faces new trial as Germany makes desperate bid to jail 50 former S.S. men before they die peacefully of old age

Auschwitz death camp guard, 93, faces new trial as Germany makes desperate bid to jail 50 former S.S. men before they die peacefully of old age | British Genealogy | Scoop.it
Hans Lipschis, 93, will be the first person brought to court after investigations were launched into the Auschwitz guards who escaped scot free after WW2.
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George Mackenzie (lawyer) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Sir George Mackenzie of Rosehaugh, Knt. (1636/1638–1691), known as Bluidy Mackenzie, was a Scottish lawyer, Lord Advocate, and legal writer.[1]

Mackenzie, who was born in Dundee, was the son of Sir Simon Mackenzie of Lochslin (died about 1666) and Elizabeth, daughter of the Reverend Peter Bruce, minister of St. Leonard's, and Principal of St. Leonard's Hall in the University of St. Andrews. Simon was the son of Kenneth Mackenzie, 1st Lord Mackenzie of Kintail and so George Mackenzie was the nephew of George Mackenzie, 2nd Earl of Seaforth.[2]

He was educated at the King's College, University of Aberdeen (which he entered in 1650), the University of St Andrews, and the University of Bourges in France.[3]

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William Bruce (architect) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Sir William Bruce of Kinross, 1st Baronet (circa 1630 – 1 January 1710) was a Scottish gentleman-architect, "the effective founder of classical architecture in Scotland," as Howard Colvin observes.[1] As a key figure in introducing the Palladian style into Scotland, he has been compared to the pioneering English architects Inigo Jones and Christopher Wren,[2] and to the contemporaneous introducers of French style in English domestic architecture, Hugh May and Sir Roger Pratt.[1]

Bruce was a merchant in Rotterdam during the 1650s, and played a role in the Restoration of Charles II in 1659. He carried messages between the exiled king and General Monck, and his loyalty to the king was rewarded with lucrative official appointments, including that of Surveyor General of the King's Works in Scotland, effectively making Bruce the "king's architect". His patrons included John Maitland, 1st Duke of Lauderdale, the most powerful man in Scotland at the time, and Bruce rose to become a member of Parliament, and briefly sat on the Scottish Privy Council.

Despite his lack of technical expertise, Bruce became the most prominent architect of his time in Scotland. He worked with competent masons and professional builders, to whom he imparted a classical vocabulary; thus his influence was carried far beyond his own aristocratic circle. Beginning in the 1660s he built and remodelled a number of country houses, including Thirlestane Castle for the Duke of Lauderdale, and Prestonfield House. Among his most significant work was his own Palladian mansion at Kinross, built on the Loch Leven estate which he had purchased in 1675. As the king's architect he undertook the rebuilding of the Royal Palace of Holyroodhouse in the 1670s, which gave the palace its present appearance. After the death of Charles II Bruce lost political favour, and later, following the accession of William and Mary, he was imprisoned more than once as a suspected Jacobite. However, he managed to continue his architectural work, often providing his services to others with Jacobite sympathies.

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Broadside entitled 'Extraordinary Apprehension and Examination of the Edinburgh Gentleman Swindler'

Broadside entitled 'Extraordinary Apprehension and Examination of the Edinburgh Gentleman Swindler' | British Genealogy | Scoop.it
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'Hitler's holiday snaps' revealed as author publishes archive of aerial reconnaissance photographs of Britain taken by the Luftwaffe in World War Two

'Hitler's holiday snaps' revealed as author publishes archive of aerial reconnaissance photographs of Britain taken by the Luftwaffe in World War Two | British Genealogy | Scoop.it
The photos are the subject of a new book by historian and author Nigel Clarke of Lyme Regis, Dorset. They were discovered in a secret archive of wartime reconnaissance pictures.
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The submarine in a 'vegetable patch': Code in letters sent home by British PoW in WWII to help Allies is revealed after 70 years

The submarine in a 'vegetable patch': Code in letters sent home by British PoW in WWII to help Allies is revealed after 70 years | British Genealogy | Scoop.it
Sub Lt John Pryor was captured at Dunkirk in 1940 and sent to a German prisoner of war camp. As a reward for good behaviour he could send letters home to his parents in Saltash, Cornwall.
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Family life frozen in time: Eerie images of the abandoned farm houses where even the beds are still made

Family life frozen in time: Eerie images of the abandoned farm houses where even the beds are still made | British Genealogy | Scoop.it
A Dutch photographer has captured the decaying furniture and ornaments left behind in buildings where the owners have long since departed.
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Mystery of the missing Knight from the Middle Ages is solved as researchers find his family crypt under an Edinburgh car park

Mystery of the missing Knight from the Middle Ages is solved as researchers find his family crypt under an Edinburgh car park | British Genealogy | Scoop.it
Seven full and one partial skeleton have been found, including an adult female and infant skeleton (pictured), in what is believed to be the family crypt of a Knight from the Middle Ages.
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Were America's Pilgrim Fathers a bunch of Essex Boys? Harwich lays claim to the Mayflower as it takes on Plymouth ahead of 400th anniversary

Were America's Pilgrim Fathers a bunch of Essex Boys? Harwich lays claim to the Mayflower as it takes on Plymouth ahead of 400th anniversary | British Genealogy | Scoop.it
The ship which transported the enterprising Puritans across the Atlantic was apparently built in Essex, and may have made only a brief stop-over in Plymouth as it began its journey.
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Hear the voice of Alexander Graham Bell - Nova Scotia - CBC News

Hear the voice of Alexander Graham Bell - Nova Scotia - CBC News | British Genealogy | Scoop.it
A 128-year-old recording of the voice of Alexander Graham Bell, best known as the inventor of the telephone, was played back this week on CBC's As It Happens.
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Greyfriars Kirkyard - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Greyfriars Kirkyard is the graveyard surrounding Greyfriars Kirk in Edinburgh, Scotland. It is located at the southern edge of the Old Town, adjacent to George Heriot's School. Burials have been taking place since the late 16th century, and a number of notable Edinburgh residents are interred at Greyfriars. The Kirkyard is operated by City of Edinburgh Council in liaison with a charitable trust, which is linked to but separate from the church. The Kirkyard and its monuments are protected as a category A listed building.[1]

Greyfriars takes its name from the Franciscan friary on the site, which was dissolved in 1559. The churchyard was founded in 1561/2, to replace the churchyard at St Giles, which was considered full. A record from the Town Council records for 23 April 1561 reads:

The Kirkyard was involved in the history of the Covenanters. The Covenanting movement began with signing of the National Covenant in Greyfriars Kirk on 28 February 1638. Following the defeat of the militant Covenanters at Bothwell Brig in 1679, some 1200 Covenanters were imprisoned in a field to the south of the churchyard. When, in the 18th century, part of this field was amalgamated into the churchyard as vaulted tombs the area became known as the "Covenanters' Prison".

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John Maitland, 1st Duke of Lauderdale - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Sir John Maitland, 1st Duke and 2nd Earl of Lauderdale, 3rd Lord Thirlestane KG PC (24 May 1616, Lethington, East Lothian - 1682), was a Scottish politician, and leader within the Cabal Ministry.

Maitland was a member of an ancient family of both Berwickshire and East Lothian, the eldest surviving son of John Maitland, 2nd Lord Maitland of Thirlestane (d. 1645), (who had been created Viscount of Lauderdale in 1616, and Earl of Lauderdale etc., in 1624), and of Lady Isabel (1594–1638), daughter of Alexander Seton, 1st Earl of Dunfermline and great-grandson of Sir Richard Maitland of Lethington, the poet.[1]

Maitland began public life as a zealous adherent of the Presbyterian cause, took the Covenant, sat as an elder in the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland at St Andrews in July 1643, and was sent to the Kingdom of England as a Commissioner for the Covenant in August, and to attend the Westminster Assembly in November.[1]

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