British Colonisation of Australia
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British Colonisation of Australia
NSW K-6 HSIE Syllabus
Stage 2 - Change and Continuity - CCS2.1
Subject Matter: The establishment of a British colony — aspects of life, significant people including Arthur Phillip, achievements, events and places.
Curated by Heather Munro
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Ancient Australian History

Ancient Australian History | British Colonisation of Australia | Scoop.it
Heather Munro's insight:

This website is a resource that could be used by students in the classroom independently or in pairs. This website covers the Colonisation of Australia to Federation (1788-1900) that this subject matter is purely interested in. It does also cover Australia before colonisation and post Federation. Colonisation has been split into seven different categories, which detail different events and consequences, such as the Australian Explorers; who moved away from the safety of the shoreline to map out Australia, the Goldrush and Bushrangers. This resource meets the required subject matter, better in some aspects than others, for example the category of Early Years, where significant people such as Governor Arthur Phillip, John Macarthur and Lachlan Macquarie can be found in detail. This website should be used in conjunction with an Indigenous source when teaching about the Colonisation because it lacks the Indigenous perspective which is an essential element to teaching this subject matter, as the Indigenous community were devastated by Colonisation. This website should also be used with another resource that provides an insight to the life of free settlers, as it only offers the perspective of convicts and doesn’t acknowledge other groups who moved over to Australia in the early years for other reasons.

 

The purpose of allowing students to work independently from the teacher on this website is to engage them in the development of their literacy and research skills whilst using ICT. To direct and maintain students’ engagement on task, meaningful and effective activities should be developed in order to prevent students from merely skimming the information to retrieve answers to the activities that the website has to offer. De Bono's Six Thinking Hats (The Opportunity Thinker, 2013) can be used by students to analyse the specific information provided by this website, such as the convicts section. The students will use all of the hats to comment on the treatment and wellbeing of the convicts, to sympathise and challenge the ideals held at the time; to have a better understanding of the tensions that came with Australia being settled by convicts forced into transportation.

 

If teachers use this website appropriately and in consultation with other resources, it can have great potential with students in broadening their knowledge on the Colonisation of Australia as well as build their self-confidence on researching and retrieving answers from the internet independently.

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Elizabeth Woodhouse's comment, April 1, 2013 9:48 PM
This is very interesting! :)
cy.osaki's curator insight, November 10, 2013 5:57 PM

this site tells you about the different times of australia

ZOE MILLER's curator insight, November 10, 2013 5:58 PM

this site is good for knowing about different times in autralian history

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Biography - Arthur Phillip - Australian Dictionary of Biography

Heather Munro's insight:

This website is a database which contains biographies of significant people throughout Australia’s history. This website is a great resource for teachers because it provides detailed biographies for many people who lived in early colonised Australia, which range from well-known individuals as Captain Arthur Phillip, to lowly convicts. These biographies provide an insight to what convicts had done to get transported, and the accomplishments some had made upon their pardon in Australia. The biographies of significant people can be used to help understand the reasons why certain events occurred in the colonies, by having knowledge of the reputation and backstory of relevant individuals.

 

A possible teaching strategy would be to implement the jigsaw approach, which involves cooperative peer teaching (Petty, 2009). This activity works by the teacher selecting highly significant and relevant individuals from early colonial Australia, such as Captain Arthur Phillip and Bennelong, and adapting the biography of each to the standard the students are at, regarding literacy levels and complexity. The students will receive a worksheet containing a table which requires them to fill in the relevant information on each personality, such as position and contribution to the colony. Each student will be allocated a group, where each group will receive one biography to become the ‘expert’ in, where they will read through the biography together and jointly pull out the required information and answer the table for their personality (Petty, 2009). The groups will then be split and the students will reform new groups, where there is an expert from each personality in the new group. All students will have the opportunity to share the information they collected on their individual with their new group, whilst learning about the different personalities studied by the rest of the class.

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BBC - Radio 4 Empire - Australia: Transportation

BBC - Radio 4 Empire - Australia: Transportation | British Colonisation of Australia | Scoop.it
BBC Radio 4 Series: This Sceptred Isle - Empire. A 90 part history of the British Empire. Episode 34: Australia - Transportation
Heather Munro's insight:

This resource has been developed by Great Britain and not only provides the reader with a perspective that isn’t Australian, but from the country who colonised and transported their own criminals to Australia. In episode 34, Australia – Transportation, the reasons why the British Empire wanted to establish a penal colony in Australia are detailed, and in episode 35, Australia – Sheep and Gold, they have mentioned that Australia wasn’t only a penal colony; it was a society that consisted of both convicts and freeholders.

 

This source provides an interactive timeline and map, which demonstrates to the viewer the vast size of the British Empire during the time of Australia’s colonisation. The students can rewind the timeline as far back as 1155 to understand the influence and power that the British Empire had in the world, and how in 1788, the Empire was still at its peak and expanding even more. This timeline demonstrates which areas of Australia were under British rule following the initial settlement in 1788, and helps students to understand the duration that had lapsed for each of the individual colonies to establish. It reinforces that in 1788, the whole landscape of Australia wasn’t under British ruling, but it was rather limited to isolated colonies lost amongst vast amounts of land, which we now identify as owned and habituated by Indigenous Australians. It also highlights the major achievement that early settlers accomplished which can’t be dismissed, that they did succeed in their mission of colonising Australia. We underestimate and take for granted, how hard it must have been to establish a settlement in an unknown land that was completely different from Britain, and episode 34 touches on how farmers had to adapt their livestock for them to live off the land and not depend on supplies being sent from their homeland.

 

This resource provides students with an insight to why Great Britain set out to establish a British colony in Australia, and with this understanding, students will be more capable in deducting the actions of the early settlers, appreciate the change of lifestyle that they had to face, and acknowledge the major achievement that they accomplished, of colonising Australia for the British Empire.

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education - Colonisation on ASO - Australia's audio and visual heritage online

education - Colonisation on ASO - Australia's audio and visual heritage online | British Colonisation of Australia | Scoop.it
Video clips related to Colonisation that have teachers notes on australianscreen.
Heather Munro's insight:

This website provides access to short videos collected by Australian Screen (2013), which is the source of Australia’s audio-visual heritage, and has a section dedicated to colonisation. The video extracts from The Colony (Australia Screen, 2013) would be particularly useful for students to use when looking at aspects of life associated with living on a newly established colony. These extracts are set in modern times, where three families are taking part in a living history experiment, where the participants have been placed into similar conditions as those arriving to Australia in 1788. While some may have reservations about using documented living history, it would be beneficial to students in small doses to make this part of history more realistic and imaginable for them. This resource demonstrates a key feature involved with history education, the role of ‘story’, which encourages the students to view this subject matter as a story, rather than historical facts that they must learn, as “stories have great potential to create interest in the past…They can spark initial curiosity” (Gilbert and Hoepper, p.200, 2011), and the students will meaningfully engage more easily.

 

An example of how a teacher could use this resource in the classroom would be to allow students to watch the video extracts and then begin a class discussion on what life would be like in early Australia on the colony, relating back to the video and suggesting what supplies the settlers had access to and where these materials came from. The teacher can easily build activities relating to the information discussed and use them as a cross-curriculum tool, such as using the rations that settlers were provided with as stimulus for mathematics. This activity could involve looking at how much money the British Government would need to supply the colonies with to fund these families, and also proceeding on to hypothetical bartering between students. Literacy links could also be made, where the student is taking on a persona who lived on the colonies and write a diary entry based on that fictitious person’s average day, which the teacher could use as an assessment tool to see if students understand different aspects of life that was present following the colonisation of Australia.

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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, May 12, 2013 9:39 PM

This site has a range of short videos that provide useful and interesting snapshots of what life was like in the colonies. 

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Aboriginal history timeline (1770 - 1899) - Creative Spirits

Aboriginal history timeline (1770 - 1899) - Creative Spirits | British Colonisation of Australia | Scoop.it
 
Heather Munro's insight:

This is an Indigenous Australian resource and provides a timeline of events that occurred throughout 1770-1899 from the Indigenous perspective. In the society we live in, we cannot deny the devastating effect that the arrival and establishment of a British colony, has been detrimental to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. This subject matter doesn’t explicitly mention the Aboriginal community, as it is accounted for in following subject matter (Board of Studies, 1998), however, many events that occurred following the establishment of a British colony are due to the inability for the settlers to live alongside and understand the Aboriginal community, and hostile interaction was often the end result. 

 

It is hard to understand what really unfolded between the Aboriginal community and the British settlers unless one seeks out Indigenous sources to view, in conjunction with the readily available British primary sources. It is easier to say there was conflict between these two groups and move on to the next part of the syllabus, but to understand the issues that currently affect Australia today and therefore have a better understanding, we have to seek out the past from which the present stems from, and learn from it.

When teaching about the establishment of a British colony, we should be using the “interpretation and evaluation of diverse forms of evidence and the appreciation of conflicting accounts of the past and differences in historical interpretation as key elements” (Cavanagh, p.55, 2011). There were two distinct cultural groups present at colonisation, both have their own perspective of events that unfolded and therefore this act of teaching shared history should be used to provide students with a significantly better education then if taught otherwise.

 

This resource serves the purpose of introducing the students to a different perspective on the establishment of a British colony, where they look at the events that were recorded by the Indigenous community, shedding light on the true extent of conflict that occurred between these two groups.

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cy.osaki's curator insight, November 10, 2013 5:55 PM

This site is useful because it gives you a timeline with the dates