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At Year's End, News of a Global Health Success

At Year's End, News of a Global Health Success | Bribie High Geography | Scoop.it
The stunning drop in global child mortality is proof that poor countries are not doomed to eternal misery. Here's how it happened.

Via Seth Dixon
Matt Evan Dobbie's insight:

Child mortality info

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Eliana Oliveira Burian's curator insight, December 26, 2012 3:42 AM

Hello, everyone

Thought this could be a good start...! Anything in mind?

 

 

diana buja's curator insight, December 27, 2012 12:44 AM
Seth Dixon, Ph.D.'s insight:

Global health has substantially improved in the last two decades.  This article explores the improvements in global health that have been made this year, and the attached interactive feature allows users to explore the changes in global health risks.  Click here for the Guardian's version of this same data and interactive.  

 

100 Pound Loans's comment, December 27, 2012 1:05 AM
Hi, Great to see a new list of top travel blogs. With over 8000 uniques per month, I feel mine should be in there somewhere. Could you take a look at http://www.honeymoonpackagesindia.org.in/ ? Thanks
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The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising

The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising | Bribie High Geography | Scoop.it
Scientists have issued a new warning to the world’s coastal megacities that the threat from subsiding land is a more immediate problem than rising sea levels caused by global warming.

 

A new paper from the Deltares Research Institute in the Netherlands published in April identified regions of the globe where the ground level is falling 10 times faster than water levels are rising - with human activity often to blame.

In Jakarta, Indonesia’s largest city, the population has grown from around half a million in the 1930s to just under 10 million today, with heavily populated areas dropping by as much as six and a half feet as groundwater is pumped up from the Earth to drink.

The same practice led to Tokyo’s ground level falling by two meters before new restrictions were introduced, and in Venice, this sort of extraction has only compounded the effects of natural subsidence caused by long-term geological processes.

 

Tags: coastal, climate change, urban, megacities, water, environment, urban ecology.


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Huge problem when combined with sea level rise

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Dave Cottrell's curator insight, July 31, 11:35 AM

If people paid more attention to the way they are treating their immediate area, it would go a very long way to creating better conditions world wide.  Instead, so many are fixated on the impending doom of "man-made global warming" that they don't keep their own back yard clean.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 1, 9:32 PM

Perception!

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 3:53 PM

APHG-U7

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Dimensions of need - Feeding the world: The search for food security

Dimensions of need - Feeding the world: The search for food security | Bribie High Geography | Scoop.it
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Article on how to feed our growing population.

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Why the agriculture industry hates Chipotle - Tarini Parti and Helena Bottemiller Evich

Why the agriculture industry hates Chipotle - Tarini Parti and Helena Bottemiller Evich | Bribie High Geography | Scoop.it
People love Chipotle’s “The Scarecrow” — a touching animated short film that’s basically a polemic on industrial food. The agriculture industry hates it. But the fast-growing burrito chain doesn’t care.
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Interesting look at agricultutre and fast food.

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At Year's End, News of a Global Health Success

At Year's End, News of a Global Health Success | Bribie High Geography | Scoop.it
The stunning drop in global child mortality is proof that poor countries are not doomed to eternal misery. Here's how it happened.

Via Seth Dixon
Matt Evan Dobbie's insight:

Child mortality info

more...
Eliana Oliveira Burian's curator insight, December 26, 2012 3:42 AM

Hello, everyone

Thought this could be a good start...! Anything in mind?

 

 

diana buja's curator insight, December 27, 2012 12:44 AM
Seth Dixon, Ph.D.'s insight:

Global health has substantially improved in the last two decades.  This article explores the improvements in global health that have been made this year, and the attached interactive feature allows users to explore the changes in global health risks.  Click here for the Guardian's version of this same data and interactive.  

 

100 Pound Loans's comment, December 27, 2012 1:05 AM
Hi, Great to see a new list of top travel blogs. With over 8000 uniques per month, I feel mine should be in there somewhere. Could you take a look at http://www.honeymoonpackagesindia.org.in/ ? Thanks
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Geography game: how well do you know the world?

Geography game: how well do you know the world? | Bribie High Geography | Scoop.it
Play the Global development game: identify the world's countries and territories, rank them according to GDP then fingers at the ready for the picture round

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Geography game

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 21, 2012 5:50 AM

This game is not as simple as it may appear.  The first round challenges you to be able to recall basic facts, the second has you comparing countries while the third asks you about global current events.  Hopefully geography education around the world can get past that '1st round' and into deeper content.  Good luck (Hint: use a computer with a mouse since locating the countries on the map is a timed activity).  


Tags: games, K12.

Eliana Oliveira Burian's curator insight, December 26, 2012 3:46 AM

Are you ready?

 

Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 11, 2013 9:07 PM

Ughhhhhh, this is addicting. Must stop playing. Must keep playing so I can beat JC.

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All Over the Map: 10 Ways to Teach About Geography

All Over the Map: 10 Ways to Teach About Geography | Bribie High Geography | Scoop.it
We have created 10 activities for teaching about geography using Times content, all related to the National Geography Standards.
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Matt Evan Dobbie's comment, December 6, 2012 6:51 PM
Ideas for teaching Geography in the classroom.
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2013 World Hunger and Poverty Facts and Statistics by World Hunger Education Service

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Population and Feeding the World — Global Issues

Population and Feeding the World — Global Issues | Bribie High Geography | Scoop.it
This part of the globalissues.org web site looks into the relationship between growing populations, hunger and feeding the world.
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Comprehensive coverage of the issue of feeding the world.

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Ultra-Dense Housing

Ultra-Dense Housing | Bribie High Geography | Scoop.it
Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated areas in the world. Seven million people living in 423 square miles (1,096 sq km).

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 2:55 PM

With Hong Kong being one of the most densely populated areas in the world, it is no surprise that living quarters are tight with not much space to move. In the photos shown, apartments were so small that they could only be photographed from the ceiling. There is no place to relax and residents are lucky to have whatever they can fit besides their beds. Families with children have to have bunk-beds in order to accommodate. 

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2:57 PM

Wow, I cannot imagine living in these conditions. It looks smaller than a prison cell; only people pay to live there. These extreme living conditions are a result of over population in an area. It seems the city of Hong Kong is running out of places to build and house the abundance of people living there. It appears the average person in Hong Kong lives in these conditions due to the high price tags on larger apartments. This is a sad reality.   

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 8:06 AM

Living in such close quarters must be incredibly hard to do for those people who are new to Hong Kong and know something different. For Chinese residents, this is normal. Living in such small areas is a part of the Chinese daily life and culture. China is so population dense that this is the result of living there, tiny living spaces.

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Top 10 “Nat Geo Talks” of 2012

Top 10 “Nat Geo Talks” of 2012 | Bribie High Geography | Scoop.it
Live presentations have been a part of National Geographic since the 1800s, and today more than 140 are viewable online. See this year's best.

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Videos on various geography topics

 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 27, 2012 8:13 AM

These talks are always quality presentations and this set of 10 videos is a part of the Explorers Journal sponsored by the National Geographic Society. 

Eliana Oliveira Burian's curator insight, December 28, 2012 3:27 AM

Top 10 National Geographic Talks!!!!

asnal abbas's comment, December 31, 2012 5:05 AM
http://www.fecebook.com
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Following 'Geography Education'

Following 'Geography Education' | Bribie High Geography | Scoop.it

Finding Materials: This site is designed for geography students and teachers to find interesting, current supplemental materials.  To search for place-specific posts, browse this interactive map.  To search for thematic posts, see http://geographyeducation.org/thematic/ (organized by the APHG curriculum).  Also you can search for a keyword by clicking on the filter tab above.

 

Staying Connected: You can receive post updates in the way that best fits how you use social media.

Update Notifications: Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest.

              Email: Click 'follow' button at top right of this page.

Sites with Content: Wordpress, Scoop.it.


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Interactive map

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Emma Lafleur's curator insight, January 24, 2013 2:34 PM

A great interactive map to learn about different regions of the world.

chris tobin's curator insight, January 24, 2013 2:35 PM

This is a really cool map from class

Marie Schoeman's curator insight, February 20, 2013 1:07 AM

This site collects interesting sites on Geography Teaching. It is anticipated that there will also be articles on differentiation which could assist teachers to present Geography in an inclusive way.