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The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising

The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising | Bribie High Geography | Scoop.it
Scientists have issued a new warning to the world’s coastal megacities that the threat from subsiding land is a more immediate problem than rising sea levels caused by global warming.

 

A new paper from the Deltares Research Institute in the Netherlands published in April identified regions of the globe where the ground level is falling 10 times faster than water levels are rising - with human activity often to blame.

In Jakarta, Indonesia’s largest city, the population has grown from around half a million in the 1930s to just under 10 million today, with heavily populated areas dropping by as much as six and a half feet as groundwater is pumped up from the Earth to drink.

The same practice led to Tokyo’s ground level falling by two meters before new restrictions were introduced, and in Venice, this sort of extraction has only compounded the effects of natural subsidence caused by long-term geological processes.

 

Tags: coastal, climate change, urban, megacities, water, environment, urban ecology.


Via Seth Dixon
Matt Evan Dobbie's insight:

Huge problem when combined with sea level rise

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Dave Cottrell's curator insight, July 31, 2:35 PM

If people paid more attention to the way they are treating their immediate area, it would go a very long way to creating better conditions world wide.  Instead, so many are fixated on the impending doom of "man-made global warming" that they don't keep their own back yard clean.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 2, 12:32 AM

Perception!

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 6:53 PM

APHG-U7

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Ultra-Dense Housing

Ultra-Dense Housing | Bribie High Geography | Scoop.it
Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated areas in the world. Seven million people living in 423 square miles (1,096 sq km).

Via Seth Dixon
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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 11:06 AM

Living in such close quarters must be incredibly hard to do for those people who are new to Hong Kong and know something different. For Chinese residents, this is normal. Living in such small areas is a part of the Chinese daily life and culture. China is so population dense that this is the result of living there, tiny living spaces.

Jennifer Brown's curator insight, October 6, 3:34 PM

add your insight...

This article was making me have a panic attack just looking at the photos. Is space really that limited? How can people live like this and not long live like this also have so much stuff? This is a hoarders dream! Tight spaces and a lot of stuff! Is it really worth it to pay that much to live in Hong Kong? I think I would rather live outside the community and pay to commute rather than be cramped ALL the time. How can the quality of life be great for these people? Tight subways, tight apartments, tight government. Maybe I'm just thinking with my 5'10 mind frame and vase open acreage that is slowing shrinking with new communities being developed but still. Not only sleeping but paying for a 423 Sq. Ft apartment for my entire family would be insane. You could never get a minute to yourself, someone would always be there. I am wondering though if this is the new way of living. Hong Kong and the “new” Arcade apartments in Providence?

James Hobson's curator insight, October 6, 3:47 PM

(in-class 4: Hong Kong)

What I take away from this is the theme of supply and demand. Though these condiions seem stereotypically negative, it seems like those who live in the photographed homes are relatvely well off (food, TV, clothing, etc.). This supports the view that living in these tight conditions is less of a choice and more of something that has to be put up with. Now that Hong Kong has been developed 'across', it'd be a good guess to say that recently investments have been made to build 'up' with highrises and skyscrapers (unless like Dubai they sat to mak either own islands, whic geographically would be less likely here). The questionof sustainability is also an issue, i.e. at what point will it be impossible to cram in any more inhabitants? I wonder if a future migration / spreading-out into other areas has started to occur yet or will soon, like the suburbanization which occured in the U.S. after the advent of the automobile. If so, would it be mainland China, despite the political tensions?