Brian Rose's A MidSummer Night's Dream
11 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Brian Rose
Scoop.it!

A Midsummer Nights Dream trailer Inception style - YouTube

A Midsummer Nights Dream parody trailer
Brian Rose's insight:

VIDEO:

This video successfully parodies many things from both pop culture and the geek/nerd world. Most blatantly it makes fun of A Midsummer Night's Dream, but it also makes fun of Inception and fighting games. It shows how different each interpretation of films and plays can be.

more...
Jason Carey's comment, March 10, 2014 9:12 PM
I enjoyed watching your video a lot in class. I like how it shows how Shakespeare's plays can be turned into any time period imaginable and still make some sense. Great choice on your video!
Morgan Brien's comment, March 11, 2014 10:38 AM
I really enjoyed your video. I thought it was very cool how the kids put there own spin on the play. Shaksperes plays can be changed at anytime, by changing costumes, the set, and the charcaters personality. It's cool how plays can be changed at anytime. I wish we had a project like this, in the future.
Scooped by Brian Rose
Scoop.it!

Was there a real Shakespeare?

Was there a real Shakespeare? | Brian Rose's A MidSummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Brian Rose's insight:

HISTORICAL:

René Weis explains how Shakespeare was most definitely a real person, in the sense that he was born like everyone else and performed bodily functions just like everyone else. And the true nature of Shakespeare is more unknown than we are led to believe. Shakespeare was influenced by many previous writers that influenced the culture of future societies, i.e. Shakespeare's favorite classical historian, Plutarch (c.46–120 CE). Weis goes on to convey that modern cultures are influenced by previous cultures instead of current cultures shaping former cultures. Shakespeare also signed all of his plays with very subtle homages to his personal life. For example, setting the Induction to The Taming of the Shrew in Wilmcote, which was his Mother's home village near Stratford in order to distinguish it from the earlier Shrew play. Even though barely anyone at the time knew any aspects of Shakespeare's personal life, he put little hints like that into his plays so that he could identify with them. Also, "He is traditionally cast in the role of chameleon poet, because he assimilated so many different characters all at once in his plays while himself remaining forever elusive." (Weis 225)

 

Weis, René. "Was There A Real Shakespeare?." Textual Practice 23.2 (2009): 215-228. Literary Reference Center. Web. 24 Feb. 2014.

 

http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=lfh&AN=37222920&site=ehost-live

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Brian Rose
Scoop.it!

The Book of Theseus

The Book of Theseus | Brian Rose's A MidSummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Brian Rose's insight:

SOURCE ARTICLE:

Theseus from Giovanni Boccaccio's The Book of Theseus  is Shakespeare's inspiration for the duke of Athens, Theseus, in his A Mid Summer Night's Dream. In Boccaccio's story, Theseus is the ruler of Athens and gets married to Hippolyta. Shakespeare's rendition of Theseus focuses on the days leading up to the wedding of theseus and Hippolyta.

 

Cottrell, Alan. "The Book Of Theseus." Masterplots, Fourth Edition (2010): 1-4. Literary Reference Center. Web. 12 Feb. 2014


http://web.b.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail?sid=0f62f3b7-db27-4b6a-b415-4aa4189a760c%40sessionmgr115&vid=1&hid=103&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#db=lfh&AN=103331MP412319560000887

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Brian Rose
Scoop.it!

Shakespearean Insults

Shakespearean Insults | Brian Rose's A MidSummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Brian Rose's insight:

IMAGE:

Insults have evolved through the years of Human existence. Nowadays we use swears and vulgarities to express feelings of frustration and dismay. Although these insults are very silly sounding, they were used in Shakespeare's plays and had the same meaning and hurtfulness at that time as calling someone out for having a different sexual orientation is today (calling someone "gay" or a "faggot"). Today, insults have been shortened to just calling someone an idiot but, back then someone who was dumb was described as having, "Not so much brain as earwax", and, "Light of Brain".

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mo3trXcyEm0

more...
david desautell's comment, March 10, 2014 8:11 PM
I really enjoyed this scoop because it brings up the point of how our language has evolved, from long, complex, multi-word insults into one single word. In retrospect, their insults seem silly to us, however I wonder how someone from the Elizabethan era would react to the ones we use today :3
Scooped by Brian Rose
Scoop.it!

Expounding the Dream

Brian Rose's insight:

LITERARY CRITICISM:

Frye's criticism of A Midsummer Night's Dream is that the play's meaning is confusing. Shakespeare wrote Midsummer in a way that anyone could interpret it in anyway that they please. Everyone's interpretation of it is different and this causes the play to be hard to understand. For example, Frye talks about how there are many different renditions of the play and it's use of the wall that separates Pyramus and Thisbe. The wall can be interpreted as a physical wall between the two, or could mean a figurative wall between the fairy world and the real world. Other interpretations could be that the wall is the difference of night and day, night being when the two lovers can meet in secret and day being when they cannot see each other for fear of being punished.

 

Frye, Northrop. "Expounding the Dream." Bloom's Literature. Facts On File, Inc. Web. 24 Feb. 2014

http://www.fofweb.com/activelink2.asp?ItemID=WE54&WID=103230&SID=5&iPin=BMDWSC39&SingleRecord=True.

more...
No comment yet.