Breast Cancer Support Today
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Rescooped by Micki Huston from Breast Cancer News
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» Telephone Counseling Can Aid Recovery After Breast Cancer - Psych Central News

» Telephone Counseling Can Aid Recovery After Breast Cancer - Psych Central News | Breast Cancer Support Today | Scoop.it
New research suggests telephone-based counseling, when combined with physician advice, can help breast cancer survivors with their recovery. Investigators

Via Susan Zager
Micki Huston's insight:

I would add that peer mentoring is most effective in most cases.

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Susan Zager's curator insight, June 12, 2013 12:33 PM

“Breast cancer patients are followed by their health care providers for a long time after treatment, which presents many opportunities for providers to share advice about physical activity and other healthy lifestyle changes,” said lead author Bernardine M. Pinto, Ph.D."

They say that this can help with breast cancer recovery as a follow up to treatment.


 For the abstract in relation to this study go to: http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/hea/32/6/616/


Rescooped by Micki Huston from Breast Cancer News
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Members with advanced breast cancer now have support in sharing perspective

Members with advanced breast cancer now have support in sharing perspective | Breast Cancer Support Today | Scoop.it
They are women who say they have been forgotten in the fight to beat breast cancer. And now they want others with advanced breast cancer to know they have support by sharing their perspective.

Via Susan Zager
Micki Huston's insight:

This movement is long overdue. Kudos!

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Susan Zager's curator insight, June 22, 2013 2:06 PM

There's a video in this article well worth watching.


Accoding to the article there's a new global survey of women with advanced breast cancer that found, "More than half say it's hurt their marriage, and that it's hard to find support groups. Nearly half say support from loved ones wanes over time, and it's hard to find helpful information. And more than three-quarters say they are actively looking for information on their own."


Corneliussen-James, an advanced breast cancer patient, advocate, and one of the founders of Metavivor says,"The breast cancer community likes to show a lot of survivors and happy, cheerful people who are doing very well, and we simply don't fit that profile. And I think in this country where everything is focused on the positive, we're just not the story they want to portray. It's important that they have a real voice with the public."


Elyse Spatz Caplan, director of programs and partnerships for Living Beyond Breast Cancer (LBBC), survivor, and advocate talks about how important it is for others to understand the needs of women with advanced breast cancer. She says, "They need to be present. They need to ask people living with advanced breast cancer, 'What would be helpful to you? What would be meaningful?' You know, one day it might be helping with errands, you know, buying groceries, providing a meal. Another day it could be something else."


For more on the global survey and resources go to: http://www.advancedbreastcancercommunity.com/