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Deconstructing chemobrain: What's new in cancer and cognition

Deconstructing chemobrain: What's new in cancer and cognition | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it

"November was an exciting month for nurses conducting research in the area of cognitive changes related to cancer and cancer treatment.

Many of us were fortunate to attend the Oncology Nursing Society Connections conference in Dallas, where we had the opportunity to share research results and discuss future research projects dedicated to learning more about the cognitive changes that some cancer survivors experience. Additionally, the November issue of the Seminars in Oncology Nursing journal was devoted to "Cognitive Changes Associated with Cancer and Cancer Treatment."

"Chemobrain" and cognitive changes due to cancer and other related treatments pose a challenge to many survivors of cancer. Incidence estimates for cancer-related cognitive changes range from 75 to 90 percent of survivors at some point prior to, during or following treatment.

Around 25 percent of survivors struggle with long-term cognitive effects. Survivors describe the experience of these cognitive changes to include issues such as difficulty with word finding, misplacing things such as keys and cell phones, forgetting why they walked into a room, missing appointments and trouble multitasking. Results from neuro-psychologic tests have shown decreases in processing speed, memory and executive function (the ability to plan out and complete the steps necessary to accomplish a goal). All of these issues cause frustration and can decrease survivors' quality of life."

Susan Zager's insight:

To participate in the clinical study mentioned above, go to https://survey.kumc.edu/se.ashx?s=5A1E27D26B60E80F

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Maria Fowler's curator insight, December 5, 2013 8:21 PM

A chance to participate in a study of chemobrain. RT  @a4breastcancer

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For Survivors of Cancer, Finding Love Involves an Extra Hurdle | Cure Magazine

For Survivors of Cancer, Finding Love Involves an Extra Hurdle | Cure Magazine | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it
For survivors of cancer, finding love involves discussing the disease and the changes it has brought.
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For Survivors of Cancer Finding Love Involves an Extra Hurdle.?
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U.S. scientists successfully turn human cancer cells back to normal in process that could 'switch off' disease

U.S. scientists successfully turn human cancer cells back to normal in process that could 'switch off' disease | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it
For the first time, aggressive breast, lung and bladder cancer cells have been turned back into harmless benign cells
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To See the study go to: http://www.nature.com/ncb/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/ncb3227.html


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Fatigue as a result of radiation; can psychological therapy help? - Medivizor

Fatigue as a result of radiation; can psychological therapy help? - Medivizor | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it
Share In a nutshell The authors aimed to determine whether psychological therapy could relieve patients with fatigue (extreme tiredness) who are undergoing breast cancer radiation (uses high energy radiation to kill cancer cells by damaging their...
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Cancer-Detecting Dogs Sniff Out Samples

Cancer-Detecting Dogs Sniff Out Samples | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it
UC Davis researchers are harnessing the power of dogs’ innate sense of smell to detect cancer, especially at early stages of the disease. The team are training two puppies, each about 4 months old —Alfie, a Labradoodle and Charlie, a German Shepherd — who are undergoing a rigorous 12-month training program to develop their abilities to detect the scent of cancer in samples of saliva, breath and urine.
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Breast cancer vaccine is 'huge discovery' that brings hope to thousands of women

Breast cancer vaccine is 'huge discovery' that brings hope to thousands of women | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it
A breast cancer vaccine could be on the way to tackle a form of the illness that does not respond to common treatments
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Genetic Testing for Breast Cancer Risk

Genetic Testing for Breast Cancer Risk | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it
Genetic testing for breast cancer risk including BRCA1 and 2 as well as less common mutations such as PTEN, TP53, CHEK2 and ATM.
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NCCN Breast Cancer Guidelines Acknowledge MammaPrint’s Ability to Predict Prognosis | Agendia

NCCN Breast Cancer Guidelines Acknowledge MammaPrint’s Ability to Predict Prognosis | Agendia | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it
Respected Panel Cites RASTER, the Only Published Prospective Outcome Data of Its Kind, Which Demonstrates MammaPrint’s Ability to Identify Those Patients Who
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Study: Higher breast cancer risk for working women in certain occupations

Study: Higher breast cancer risk for working women in certain occupations | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it
More than 20 occupations are associated with a significantly increased risk of breast cancer for working women, according to a report from t…
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To see the full report go to: http://www.breastcancerfund.org/assets/pdfs/publications/working-women-and-breast-cancer.pdf


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Blood test can predict your breast cancer risk 'years into the future'

Blood test can predict your breast cancer risk 'years into the future' | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it
Scientists hailed the ‘truly amazing’ technique as better than a mammogram. They hope it will lead to earlier treatment of a disease which kills more than 11,000 women a year in the UK.
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Rebuilding the Breast

Rebuilding the Breast | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it

From stem cells to 3D-printed nipples, breast reconstruction is a highly technical and constantly evolving field.

In 1882 an American surgeon named William Steward Halsted popularized what’s now called the radical mastectomy. He didn’t think of the idea—one of the first written proposals for a mastectomy was published by a German surgeon in 1719. But it was Halsted who made invasive removal of breast tissue a mainstream part of cancer treatment, and his version of the surgery involved removing the entire breast, along with the nearby lymph nodes and both pectoral muscles. Removing that much tissue at that period of time, before many of the surgical techniques doctors are now familiar with were developed, often left women severely disfigured.

And with the removal of breasts, or pieces of them, came the demand for cosmetic replacements. In 1874 the U.S. Patent Office issued its first patent for a breast prosthetic, to a man named Frederick Cox. The prosthetic was made up of a cotton casing filled with an inflatable breast pad."

In the following years, women would come to dominate the world of breast replacement patents. In 1904, a woman named Laura Wolfe filed a patent for an “artificial breast pad.” Her version was solid, rather than inflatable, and in her patent she described the three things a woman wanted out of a replacement breast: comfort, appearance, and product quality."


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Could one-two punch of generics for breast cancer be more powerful than wonder drug tamoxifen?

Could one-two punch of generics for breast cancer be more powerful than wonder drug tamoxifen? | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it
A study in The Lancet found that an existing class of drug could not only reduce recurrence rates but risk of death.
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As death nears, chemotherapy may do more harm than good

As death nears, chemotherapy may do more harm than good | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it
It's been documented that many terminal cancer patients don't benefit from chemotherapy and other types of treatments toward the end of their lives. Nonetheless, many, with their doctors, opt to continue treatment -- faced with impossible choices, they hold on to hope that treatment might buy some time, or improve the quality of the days they have left.
Susan Zager's insight:

To see the Jama Study go to: http://oncology.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2398177

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Fake doctor charged woman with cancer $2,000 for a bag of dirt

Fake doctor charged woman with cancer $2,000 for a bag of dirt | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it
Vincent Gammill, a 69-year-old California man was arrested for prescribing phony pills, expired prescription drugs and bags of dirt to cancer patients, claiming he was a trained oncologist.
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Black Women at Raised Risk of Carrying Breast Cancer Genes

Black Women at Raised Risk of Carrying Breast Cancer Genes | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it
In study of those under 50 with invasive form of disease, 12 percent had BRCA1, BRCA2 mutations
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Demand the EPA Tell the Truth about Fracking and Drinking Water

Demand the EPA Tell the Truth about Fracking and Drinking Water | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it

Dear Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), 

Breast Cancer Action is a national grassroots organization whose mission is to achieve health justice for all women at risk of and living with breast cancer. Our members below signed the following statement for the EPA's consideration before releasing the official version of the EPA's Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing for Oil and Gas on Drinking Water Resources:


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It only takes a moment to fill this out and tell the EPA to stop protecting the fracking industry and start protecting our public health. 

(Courtesy of Breast Cancer Action.) 
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Acupuncture best for hot flashes in breast cancer survivors, study finds

Acupuncture best for hot flashes in breast cancer survivors, study finds | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it
(HealthDay News) —Needles beat pills for treating hot flashes in breast cancer survivors, according to a new trial that compared acupuncture, "sham" acupuncture, the medication gabapentin and a placebo pill.
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Doubt Is Raised Over Value of Surgery for Breast Lesion at Earliest Stage

Doubt Is Raised Over Value of Surgery for Breast Lesion at Earliest Stage | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it
Almost all women given a diagnosis of ductal carcinoma in situ, considered a possible precursor to breast cancer, have a lumpectomy or mastectomy, but data show they may not benefit.
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Great insight by 

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Tell-tale biomarker detects early breast cancer

Tell-tale biomarker detects early breast cancer | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it
Researchers have shown that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can detect the earliest signs of breast cancer recurrence and fast-growing tumors.
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Clinical Oncology News - Massimo Cristofanilli, MD: How I Manage My Luminal A and Luminal B Breast Cancers

Clinical Oncology News - Massimo Cristofanilli, MD: How I Manage My Luminal A and Luminal B Breast Cancers | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it

"Women with relatively low-risk breast cancer have more options today than in the past decade, due in large part to novel genomic and genetic tests. These tests have demonstrated the ability to predict cancers that are more aggressive and more likely to recur. Although genetic tests for heritable mutations to genes including BRCA1 and 2 have become more commonplace, genomic tests for identifying which cancer-related genes are over- or underproduced are still relatively rare in clinical practice.

Sometimes called genomic, mole- cular, or gene-expression analysis, these tests are most useful in stratifying patients with breast cancer into disease subtypes. This is particularly useful in cases of hormone receptor (HR)-positive or luminal-type disease, which can be further stratified into the cancer subtypes luminal A and luminal B. These 2 subtypes frequently are grouped because the cancers often can be treated successfully for many years with hormone-blocking therapies. Luminal A cancers generally are characterized as those that express high levels of the estrogen receptor (ER) and the progesterone receptor (PR), as well as low levels of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), which is involved in signaling cell proliferation (Figure). Luminal B cancers generally are more aggressive and more likely to recur than luminal A cancers. Luminal B cancers also are hormone-positive, but they are highly proliferative and may have high levels of HER2, making them candidates for trastuzumab (Herceptin, Genentech/Roche).

Is chemotherapy necessary for every patient?

Definitely not. Physicians are beginning to realize that some breast cancers have a very low likelihood of becoming life-threatening. Women today can make an educated decision about the right treatment course, considering how taxing chemotherapy can be and its short and long-term adverse events (AEs).

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Paradigm, TME Research Sign Deal to Build Breast Cancer Genomic Registry

Paradigm, TME Research Sign Deal to Build Breast Cancer Genomic Registry | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it
Paradigm will use its next-generation sequencing-based test and other technologies to genomically characterize invasive breast cancer patients.
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Anyone Else Surprised by These Symptoms?

Anyone Else Surprised by These Symptoms? | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it
Ok, I need your help. I've found that the most emotionally difficult time since my cancer diagnosis has been since my last day of treatment. There are all of these things that no one tells you about. For example, I'm thirsty ALL of the time - and I'm always freezing cold. But the most startling thing I've noticed is that I've lost that "outer coating" that allows me to deal with stressful situations. Does anyone else feel this way? Is it the chemo, or is it just age?
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Patient Support Not Just a Buzzword for New England Doc

Patient Support Not Just a Buzzword for New England Doc | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it

"As medical director of radiation oncology at Lowell General Hospital in Massachusetts, Matthew Katz, MD, is well attuned to trends in breast cancer treatment.


He and his colleagues have adopted the practice of using shorter radiation courses—for example, treating lumpectomy patients when appropriate with a slightly higher dose for 3 to 4 weeks rather than a standard dose for 5 to 6 weeks. They have patients with left-sided breast cancers use deep inspiration breath hold to inflate the lungs, moving the heart momentarily to reduce its radiation exposure. And they’re interested in identifying older women who can avoid post surgical radiation that is unlikely to lengthen their lives.

But the area that most distinguishes Katz may be his interest in understanding the subtle nuances of doctor-patient communication that contribute to patients’ decision making and their experiences of treatment. That has led him to focus on supportive conversations in his practice and to venture into the wilderness of online social media to learn more about how patients view their treatment."

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OnPage.com HIPAA Compliant Messaging's curator insight, August 3, 3:33 PM

He and his colleagues have adopted the practice of using shorter radiation courses—for example, treating lumpectomy patients when appropriate with a slightly higher dose for 3 to 4 weeks rather than a standard dose for 5 to 6 weeks.


Scoop Via:  OnPage.com

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Darlene Gant remembered as a 'fighter'

Darlene Gant remembered as a 'fighter' | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it
We have a sad update to a story we’ve been following for years. Darlene Gant, the breast cancer patient using an experimental drug to fight for life, has passed away.
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How a Bunch of Scrappy Marines Could Help Vanquish Breast Cancer

How a Bunch of Scrappy Marines Could Help Vanquish Breast Cancer | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it
Exposed to poisoned water at Camp Lejeune, these vets may hold the key to a scourge that kills some 40,000 American women—and a few hundred men—per year.
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Added Radiation May Help Some With Early Breast Cancer

Added Radiation May Help Some With Early Breast Cancer | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it
Studies found it lowered chances of recurrence, but did not boost overall survival
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